1/3Term Wonder? Malcolm Turnbull

Discussion in 'Four Corners' started by whall15, Sep 14, 2015.

  1. Surely

    Surely Moderator Staff Member

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    Smells Like Peter beattie
     
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  2. Hello, I'm The Doctor

    Hello, I'm The Doctor First Grade

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    Which is why Abbott was so well placed to go for a long time.

    His failure was in not preparing for government while in opposition. He waited until he won before he started trying to figure out what to do.

    It the only reason the Libs keep getting elected...
     
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  3. Desert Qlder

    Desert Qlder First Grade

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    The sleepy John Alexander has already been completely forgotten in the Bennelong campaign.

    Kenneally v Turnbull.
     
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  4. Hello, I'm The Doctor

    Hello, I'm The Doctor First Grade

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    One of the Turnbull ministers was having a go at KK as said something like "she represented Obeid, JA represented Australia at Tennis".

    If the best thing they can say about him after 7 years in office was that he used to be good at tennis, they might have a bit of a dud candidate.
     
  5. Parra

    Parra Coach

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    What alp are you talking about. This is nsw, those merkins know best. Keneally would have to work out where Ryde and Eastwood are before she could run a survey.

    This is not as bad as parachuting Bob Carr into the senate, but it is in the same vein.
     
  6. butchmcdick

    butchmcdick Guest

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    That said Parra it will be fascinating to see how she goes
     
  7. Bandwagon

    Bandwagon Coach

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    Not quite mate, she works in the electorate and lives next door.

    I think they are banking on the fact that whilst the electorate unceremoniously booted out her government, her personal polling was ok.

    Of course it'll depend on how much the shit being thrown still sticks.
     
  8. Parra

    Parra Coach

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    As a premier she was pointless. And this shines through in her work as a commentator.

    She is a very good replacement for Maxine Mckew. They know the job is important, they know they want it, they have no idea why. Style over substance. Is Alexander any different? No idea. Maybe it is the style we deserve in current politicians - Rudd, Gillard, Turnbull, Shorten are all the same as well. No purpose, no vision. Just want.
     
  9. madunit

    madunit Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Hard to see Labor losing that seat for one reason.

    The LNP aligned sky news crew are good mates with her. Especially Jayes and Van Onselen. They'll give her a rails run for sure.
     
  10. I Bleed Maroon

    I Bleed Maroon Coach

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    Turnbull's sphincter loosened just a tiny bit today
     
  11. Surely

    Surely Moderator Staff Member

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    Elected in 2003, Keneally sat out the term on the backbench, winning promotion to the minister under Morris Iemma after the 2007 election, as Minister for Aging and Disability Services. In 2008, she inherited the controversial planning portfolio from the then out of favour Frank Sartor, who had been accused of favouring party donors in crucial planning decisions.

    Keneally was by no means immune from criticism in the job, the Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) criticising her for watering down independent planning controls introduced by Sartor in limiting the range of compulsory referrals to the Planning Assessment Commission. In doing so, Keneally totally misread the political sensitivities of the issue – or at least that’s the most charitable interpretation given her closeness to Labor Party figures like Joe Tripodi who took a close interest in development issues.

    Tripodi, at various times, was implicated in the Orange Grove and Wollongong City Council land development and zoning scandals but on each occasion was cleared by ICAC, despite his having appointed a close friend and former Wollongong Council official, against whom corruption allegations had been made, to a senior post in his department.

    If it was a lapse of judgment on Keneally’s part, it was not her last. When corruption allegations were made against Penrith MP Karyn Paluzzano, Keneally rushed to her defence, even publicly ridiculing the whistleblower who had reported the MP over her use of funds and labelling his claims vexatious. ICAC subsequently found her conduct corrupt, she resigned and the resulting by-election for the formerly safe seat of Penrith saw Labor humiliated.

    The circumstances under which Keneally came to office are also worth analysing.

    Was she the most outstanding talent in a dull bunch who simply rose to the top on her merit? She might have continued as a middle-range minister but for NSW Labor’s obsession with self-immolation when Morris Iemma, urged on by Tripodi and then Treasurer Michael Costa, decided to take on the party and the unions and privatise the NSW electricity industry, a step from which a wiser leader in Bob Carr resiled a decade earlier when he saw the size of the opposition.

    Iemma set in train a series of events that put him on collision course with the party and cost him his job. He was succeeded, almost improbably, by a first-term MP, Nathan Rees, from the party’s left. Rees, the brightest of the 2007 intake, had made his mark as Water Minister, and had shown some deft political skills in his handling of two contentious issues, implementing the $1.9 billion desalination plan at Kurnell and the proposed Tillegra Dam in the Hunter Valley.

    By this time, it was clear that Labor’s days were limited as a series of by-elections saw the latent hostility materialise. Rees saw the need for key reforms but he faced significant opposition from within, especially in regard to his efforts to dispel the lingering odour of corruption about the government.

    Rees effectively signed his own political death warrant when he sought and won from the party the right to choose his own ministers, promptly sacking Tripodi, Primary Industries Minister Ian Macdonald and parliamentary secretaries Henry Tsang and Sandra Hornery, all identified as his key opponents. Retribution was swift, with Tripodi first rounding up the numbers to force a leadership spill and then garnering support for Kristina Keneally, who had earlier pledged her support for Rees, over the only other contender, Sartor.

    The memorable words of Rees about his successor being a puppet of Tripodi and others have largely been born out. For all the talk of a new look and a fresh start from this pious Catholic mother of two with the beguilingly soothing Australianised vowels from the US mid-west, the developers and other business interests, who had caused Labor so much grief, were never really disappointed.

    Only hours before the doomed government entered caretaker mode, it resorted to the controversial ‘Part 3A’ state significant planning laws to discard the winning design for the Sydney Harbour Barangaroo development and allow giant developer Lend Lease to effectively draw up plans to sub-divide the prime site, avoiding laws to properly deal with contamination and evading judicial review. In just the same fashion, the government in its dying weeks, sold off the state’s electricity retailing arms, in just the way Tripodi had championed back in the Iemma days.

    Of course, by then parliament had been prorogued so there was no effective parliamentary scrutiny of all this. However, as regards the electricity issue, an Opposition-inspired Legislative Council inquiry proceeded, despite the earnest attempts of Keneally to shut it down, and it produced a damning indictment not only of the processes but of the premier herself. The report took issue with the premier’s premature proroguing of Parliament, finding that contrary to her own evidence to the committee “the NSW Government prorogued the parliament for the specific purpose of frustrating the Inquiry…”It was a grubby end to a grubby government.

    Was Kristina Keneally so squeaky clean as to be beyond reproach, even though she took responsibility for the defeat in her concession speech?

    It was to many a gracious departure. It was also, despite some clever phrasing and her wistful demeanour, an exercise in self-delusion and utter hypocrisy.

    When she thanked the people of NSW “who took me on my merits” she was stretching belief in suggesting they had any say in it, imposed as she was by grubby operators in whom the public had already lost all confidence. And when she said it was not the people who had left Labor, but Labor had left them, she neatly elided over the fact that she was part and parcel of the leavers, not the left.

    In the end, really, just another grubby politician, albeit with a stylish hairdo and a soft voice; the latest window display in a store full of shonky goods.

    We deserve better.

    Norman Abjorensen is a lecturer in political science at the Australian National University.


    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-04-01/politicsabjorensen/45846


    And this is the nicest thing a lecturer from anu can say about kk
     
  12. bazza

    bazza Coach

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    From what I have seen/read Alexander is pretty good but doesn't seem to align with any of the big business/big religion factions in the liberal party and so hasn't had much traction
     
  13. Desert Qlder

    Desert Qlder First Grade

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    Bennelong poll: John Alexander in fight of his life with former premier Kristina Keneally

    THE battle between former NSW Premier Kristina Keneally and tennis great John Alexander is neck and neck, putting Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull’s one-seat majority at grave risk, the first poll into the seat shows.

    An exclusive Saturday Telegraph/Galaxy Research poll has revealed just how tight the race for the seat of Bennelong is between star Labor candidate Ms Keneally and Liberal MP Mr Alexander, with the former tennis champ’s primary vote only three percentage points ahead of his television host rival while the two-party preferred vote is on a 50-50 knife-edge.

    Dissatisfaction with the Turnbull government, along with Ms Keneally’s personal appeal, has delivered Labor a massive 10 per cent swing in Bennelong since the 2016 federal election, lifting the party’s primary vote from 28.5 per cent to 39 per cent — in arm’s reach of victory.

    The vote at the December 16 by-election is of crucial importance for the Prime Minister’s grip on power. A defeat in the northern Sydney seat would mean a loss of Mr Turnbull’s one-seat majority, reducing it to 75 seats.

    He would be left with no option but to move Speaker Tony Smith back on to the floor in order to maintain control of Parliament and pass laws.

    Support for Mr Alexander has plummeted by more than 8 percentage points since the July 2016 federal election, when his primary number was a sizeable 50.4 per cent.

    The Davis Cup winner’s primary vote is still ahead of Ms Keneally’s by three percentage points — 42 to 39 per cent, the poll of 579 voters in the seat on Wednesday night found.

    But his lead is wiped out on a two-party-preferred basis, following preference flows from the last election.

    [​IMG]
    What the Saturday Telegraph/Galaxy Research poll uncovered.
    Galaxy Research managing director David Briggs, who also conducts the fortnightly Newspoll, said the result was “very much on a knife-edge” and reflected the Turnbull government’s woes.

    “What we’re seeing is that Kristina Keneally, combined with the performance of the federal government, has lifted the Labor Party vote from 28.5 per cent at the last election to 39 per cent,” he said.

    “Much of the future of the Turnbull government is resting on the results in this seat and that’s why it’s such a fascinating contest.”

    As NSW Premier, Ms Keneally led Labor to a crushing defeat at the 2011 election.

    However, the poll this week found only 42 per cent believed she did a bad job for the people of NSW and that 37 per cent were still happy with her performance as Premier.

    Mr Briggs described Ms Keneally’s time as Premier as “polarising”.
    “Keneally brings to the election something quite different — and many of the voters of Bennelong would have formed their opinion already.”

    The first poll to be conducted in former prime minister John Howard’s old electorate will be alarming for Liberal strategists, already concerned about how Opposition Leader Bill Shorten’s high-profile Labor recruit would play out.

    The federal Liberal Party director Andrew Hirst has relocated to Sydney for the duration of the campaign to help get Mr Alexander over the line, and the party is throwing every resource it has available into the campaign.

    Ms Keneally made the shock announcement she would run in Bennelong on Monday and, to combat Mr Alexander’s personal popularity as a local member, she has tried to turn the by-election into a vote on Mr Turnbull’s government.

    However, this poll will put paid to her claim that she is the underdog.

    “Mr Alexander is ahead in the polls,” she said yesterday.

    “What I’m trying to do is a huge ask, to be only the second Labor member for Bennelong in the seat’s history.”

    The contest could get even more heated with GetUp! considering throwing resources into the race and Liberal defector Senator Cory Bernardi looking at running a candidate for his Australian Conservatives party on the topic of gay marriage, with Bennelong one of the nation’s 17 seats voting no to marriage equality.

    http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/ne...y/news-story/23fbb213daef2c71697b4ea9f3d0fa69
     
  14. butchmcdick

    butchmcdick Guest

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    Just a steel town girl on a Saturday night
    Looking for the fight of life
    In the real time world they don't see her at all
    They all say she's crazy
     
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  15. Surely

    Surely Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks Bill

    Just out of interest you aren't some bot spawned out of the alp it department are you?
     
  16. Pete Cash

    Pete Cash Immortal

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    50/50 is interesting polling but its early days
     
  17. 2_Smoking_Guns

    2_Smoking_Guns First Grade

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    lol... 90% of your posts are "but Labor"... this one included...
     
  18. Surely

    Surely Moderator Staff Member

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    You don't have to jump to the bill bots defence with false statistics
     
  19. Bandwagon

    Bandwagon Coach

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    Bernardi's party entering the contest might make it more interesting, certainly would affect the Libs primary vote but should also increase their preferences I'd reckon.

    Would at the least make picking a winner a little more difficult.
     
  20. Hello, I'm The Doctor

    Hello, I'm The Doctor First Grade

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    It depends on his preference cards....

    It could go like this:
    - Break away candidate tries to steal some of original parties votes,
    - Original party dont want to give him legitimacy with preferences and refuse to do a deal,
    - BA candidate gets pissy and puts former party last, giving other major party a small boost.

    Its not certain to happen, but its fairly common. It generally works well for the major party in the long term (allowing BA candidate to fade into obscurity) but there is always short term pain.
     

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