Automation and stuff

Discussion in 'Four Corners' started by Pete Cash, Jun 1, 2016.

  1. Firey_Dragon

    Firey_Dragon Coach

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    Companies save money by hiring good corporate lawyers, not accountants. It's business structure and diversion of tax liability that makes the most savings for a business. If you're relying on an accountant to cook the books to save money, you've already left it too late.

    Most accounting in business is largely automated now already, between expense tracking and asset depreciation and whatnot. It's not like businesses are going through paper books or filing cabinets to generate their taxes anymore.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2017
  2. Danish

    Danish Referee

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    come on guys I was trying to be funny.... although in your defence it really wasn't a great joke.

    either way the "accountants" automation will do away with are largely the jokers that sit and just fill out e-tax applications for people too stupid to realise you can now do it yourself in about 3 minutes using the ATO's online tools. People handling corporations will still be required as I can't imagine computers are or ever will be great at identifying and exploiting loopholes.

    A robot accountant probably wouldn't recommend shifting corporate head quarters offshore and then shifting profits around to evade.... I mean, avoid paying taxes.
     
  3. Firey_Dragon

    Firey_Dragon Coach

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    99.9% of accountants aren't informed about international tax law either, that's the realm of lawyers. Just about one of the only truly safe professions from automation IMO.
     
  4. Surely

    Surely Moderator Staff Member

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    DoNotPay, a free-to-use artificially intelligent lawyer chatbot, is meant to do exactly that. According to a report from The Guardian, the bot has successfully contested 160,000 parking tickets in New York and London in 21 months.

    The service works like this: It walks you through a series of questions — such as whether signs were clearly visible — to find out whether an appeal is possible. Once it's determined whether or not you can appeal, it walks you through the process of actually challenging the fine. Then you sit back and wait for the legal system to make a judgement on your claim.

    [​IMG]
    DoNotPay walks users through the process of challenging parking tickets using multiple choice questions.

    The service was created by 19-year-old Stanford student Joshua Browder, who became frustrated with the appeals process after racking up 30 parking tickets in and around London. The self-taught coder realised how formulaic the appeals process is and decided to create a simple bot to help people through the entire ordeal. After letting friends and family use it, he decided to open it up to the public — for free.

    DoNotPay currently has a 64 per cent success rate, which is incredibly high. "I created it for a few family and friends and could never have imagined that in a few short months it would have appealed over $4 million [$AU5.4 million]," Browder said in a recent blog post. "The government doesn't like me very much, but people with parking tickets do!"

    Although the service is being marketed as "the world's first robot lawyer", this isn't the first time someone has tried to fight legal battles with technology. An app called Fixed launched in 2014 with a similar promise, only to be blocked by city governments one year later. In San Francisco, the city's transportation agency was so frustrated with the influx of appeals, employees went as far as shutting off the fax machine to disrupt the number of tickets being challenged.


    https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2016/06/...pealed-160000-parking-tickets-is-a-damn-hero/
     
  5. Firey_Dragon

    Firey_Dragon Coach

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    Obviously you can automate small claims or contesting parking fines, corporate law and felony cases is vastly more complex. There are certainly more "grey area" discussions that take place there that make it extremely difficult to automate.

    Paralegal work is potentially where jobs could be lost.
     
  6. Generalzod

    Generalzod Coach

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    Rise of the machines: robots are coming for middle-class jobs next

    From the factory floor to the supermarket, the call centre to the video store, it has happened to the working class already: waves of technological change that have rendered many of their jobs obsolete.

    But the next advances in automation won't just affect the low-skilled and low-paid. In the years ahead many middle-class professionals - engineers, accountants, journalists and insurance workers to name just a few - will find themselves replaced by computers, robots and artificial intelligence.

    http://www.smh.com.au/federal-polit...or-middleclass-jobs-next-20170413-gvkj3j.html
     
  7. Parra

    Parra Coach

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    The jobs our kids will perform do not exist yet.

    This is both exciting and progressive.
     
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  8. Surely

    Surely Moderator Staff Member

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    THE crowd may have cheered in stunned disbelief but the reaction to Google’s latest capability has prompted a backlash from those concerned about the ethics of intelligent robots taking over.

    In one of the most chilling technological demonstrations to date, the internet giant showed its digital assistant could mimic a human over the phone so convincingly the person on the other end of the line had no idea they were talking to a machine.

    In one demonstration, the artificially intelligent bot called a hairdresser and booked a haircut for its client. In another, the bot made a restaurant reservation after inquiring about wait times to a worker oblivious she was speaking to a computer


    http://www.news.com.au/technology/i...y/news-story/ba38ea9c75e01a30e04ff3aaa86a1291


    Looking forward to this
     
  9. Danish

    Danish Referee

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    The job they showed this AI not doing is probably the most unlikely real world use for the tech.

    Much more likely it will be restaurants and other service companies paying a tiny monthly fee to handle their phone bookings, but the big use will be call centre functionality - both inbound and outbound. Much easier to keep your sales agents on script when they are actually scripted robots, and imagine how much more reliable customer support would be when the person you are talking to has every piece of info on a product available in its memory, as opposed to some underpaid goofball
     
  10. Surely

    Surely Moderator Staff Member

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    I'll get my assistant to talk to theirs

    The only drawback is no blowies but with #metoo these days that's out anyway
     
  11. Parra

    Parra Coach

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    The big use will be some form of sexy talk.
     
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  12. Bandwagon

    Bandwagon Moderator Staff Member

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    With all the information, it will be forced to lie.
     
  13. Mr Spock!

    Mr Spock! Coach

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    I question if my profession and schools as we know it will even last a generation...
     
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  14. Danish

    Danish Referee

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    Most likely.

    However I would imagine companies would be much more liable for what their programmed AI response is on any particular issue, so they couldn’t hide behind blaming a low level support person giving “wrong” info if taken to court for example.

    If they know a product is faulty but instruct their AI to not admit to it, that’s some pretty easily traceable malfeasance
     
  15. Bandwagon

    Bandwagon Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeah, that's part of where I was going. It could go further, as in AI has only the information it is given, so if important information isn't given, then it's quite provable that is the case. There's likely some responsibility there.

    There's a shit ton of ethical / moral / legal stuff to contend with in that space.
     
  16. Danish

    Danish Referee

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    What will be funny IMO is some company will inevitably turn on machine learning with their AI so that their customer service bots can identify trends, common fixes, etc as it goes... leading to their robot customer service happily admitting to product faults that a human operator might have naturally tried to play down without any sort of instruction from management.
     
  17. Bandwagon

    Bandwagon Moderator Staff Member

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    Adding commercial considerations to the three laws of robotics will likely result in a gibbering idiot on constant loop,
     
  18. Danish

    Danish Referee

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    Maybe they’ll add in real-time analysis of you specific device.

    “my phone battery doesn’t last as long as your claim”

    “After reviewing your data logs, I can see that you appear to do a lot of video streaming from a website called ‘red tube’. Be advised that video steaming can negatively affect battery life”

    “.... let me take you off speaker.”
     
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  19. Tommy Smith

    Tommy Smith Coach

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    Don't worry because we'll all get abundantly more lesiure time to pursue our hobbies... whatever that means.

    As a human being I've always felt my best mentally when I was contributing to society, no matter how insignificant the job might be perceived.

    We humans need to carry a load. It's what we've done for thousands of years. Farm. Build. Create. Hunt. Teach. Heel. And so on.

    And now within a single generation we threaten to tear it all up and automate half of human endeavour.

    What could go wrong?!
     
  20. Pantherjim.

    Pantherjim. Coach

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    Look on the bright side; if mindless automatons ever replace Teachers, at least Miranda Devine won’t have any ammunition when it comes to her tiresome argument that “Teachers are brainwashing our kids with leftist political ideals”
     

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