Boxing - The BEST bouts youve ever seen.

Discussion in 'LWOS' started by Infuzer, Mar 24, 2003.

  1. El Duque

    El Duque Bench

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    All time fave Chavez is V Taylor in '90. This is a boxers fight. Power, speed, finesse. I could watch this every day for a year & still be impressed each time.


    That was a good fight. No matter what some say I think Steele had no choice but to stop the fight. Meldrick was holding on to the ropes and never responded to Steele's questions, so he left him with no otheroption.

     
  2. Selway

    Selway Juniors

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    do u knwo chavez taylor round was the best?
     
  3. imported_Reservoir Dog

    imported_Reservoir Dog Juniors

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    Selway, where do you get all this clips from mate?
     
  4. imported_Trojan Horse

    imported_Trojan Horse Juniors

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    No matter what some say I think Steele had no choice but to stop the fight. Meldrick was holding on to the ropes and never responded to Steele's questions, so he left him with no otheroption.
    - I couldn't disagree any more with you. Many fighter hold onto the ropes while waiting for theref's count. It doesn't mean a thing and the referee's don't take any action against it. It happens all the time. Taylor wasn't responding to Steele's questioning because he was looking over to his right sidewhere his trainer Lou Duva had {foolishly} jumped up to the ring. He may have been hurt, but no way should Steele had stopped this fight with <u>two </u>seconds from the end of the fight {12th round} remaining.Meldrick Taylor {who, IMO,had the fastest hands of any fighter I've ever seen, even RJJnr} was ripped off in this fight. He was 8-3 ahead on one ofthe judges scorecardsgoing into the 12th and final round. Taylor had blinding speed who hit hard. Chavez was a devastating hardbody puncher.
    Chavez was the harder puncher but Taylor would land maybe four or fivefor every one punch that Chavez threw. He was that quick. Meldrick Taylor totaly dominated this fight in the early 6 or so rounds. Chaves didn't know where the hits were coming from for the majority of this fight. Close to the 9th or 10th round, Taylor was a little worn out and Chavez was catching him with some good hard body and head punches. Going into their corners at the conclusion of the 11th, Lou Duva screwed up. He advised Taylor that he needed to win the 12th and final round to win the match. He said it was that close.This was bad advice from Duva, which {partly and indirectly} cost Taylor the fight. Taylor was well ahead on all three judge's score cards and only needed to see this round out to win the fight and World Championship title belt.
    Meldrick Taylor came out in the 12th roundand fought the way he only knows how. Throwing many combination punches at lightning speeds. This wore him out, as if he wasn't already by this stage. With 15seconds left in the 12th round, Chavez landed a short right-hand that dropped Taylor to the canvas. Taylor rose to his feet well before the mandatory count and turned to his right side at trainer Lou Duva who, by this stage,had climbed onto the ring {outside the ropes}. Referee Richard Steele asked Taylor <u>twice</u>if he was allright in quick concession. Taylor did not respond because he was looking at Duva trying to listen to what he was shouting out {a furious Duva, at Steele's premature stoppage, was shouting at Steele that there were 5 seconds left in the round and counting down}. Steele, obviously, not getting a response from Taylor, and ignoring Duva cries from 8 feet away, stopped the fight with two seconds remaining on the fight clock.Two seconds!Absolutelyabsurd! Chavez was awarded the winner {and appeared somewhat surprised and releaved}and regained his unbeaten record. The "Don" was hugging and kissing everyone in his sight. Lou Duva was running wild in the ring looking for Steele's blood. Steele was running scared looking for law enforcement protection. Meldrick Taylor {completely concious at the time} was simply screwed and devestated. As he should of bee.
    This is my personalopinion of one of the very best fights I've ever seen. Do yourself a favour, fight fans, and get your hands on this fight. You'll be glad you did.
    Referee Richard Steele was simply a crook working for the "Don". It's my opinion, but I'm not alone in this line of thinking as many boxing fans and experts think the same way.
    Howard Sirota from BoxingRanks wrote it well here -
    It was Richard Steele who fixed the Julio Cesar Chavez v. Meldrick Taylor fight, stealing Meldrick's victory from him and ruining his career. Taylor was beating Don King's golden goose going into the last round, when, with two seconds left and Taylor on his feet, Steele stopped the fight, giving Chavez the victory in the only possible way open to him, since the bell for the final round would have saved Taylor even if Chavez had knocked Taylor down again. In my personal opinion, the stoppage of the Chavez v. Taylor fight was such a blatantly wrong call that I don't believe that it's a coincidence that Steele's startling call put a large sum of money in the hands of Don King and kept Chavez's unbeaten streak alive. I would love to see an investigation into Richard Steele's finances and his ties to promoters. Whether it's cash in a bag, consulting deals, or just free trips, fees and exposure, I'd like to know if Don King or Bob Arum have ever had or do have any direct or indirect financial relationship with Richard Steele or any member of his family. Don King has admitted giving cash "gifts" to a variety of boxing officials; why think King would draw the line at the referee? It is of course possible that all this is simply a matter of Richard Steele rising to his level of incompetence, but I just can't believe that we'd still be seeing his shaved head if he had made controversial calls that led to the first-ever defeats of the biggest marquee names of their times. I say follow the money and you'll always know what Richard Steele will do in the ring. - Howard Sirota

     
  5. imported_Aaron C

    imported_Aaron C Juniors

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    Good to have another boxing fan in the forum.
    Sounds like a good fight to watch this Taylor-Chavez match after three of you have spoken of it.
    Where can one get some tapes or DVD's on past fights? I'd like to see this one and some others.Always wondered that....
    Cheers/ Aaron C
     
  6. El Duque

    El Duque Bench

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    When Steele waved off the fight there was actually more than 2 seconds left on the clock. If he'd let him continue Chavez had time to hit him again easily. Just watch it again and look at the on screen clock

    Harold Lederman backed Steele's decision when he was calling the fight for HBO at ringside.

    I couldn't disagree any more with you. Many fighter hold onto the ropes while waiting for theref's count. It doesn't mean a thing and the referee's don't take any action against it. It happens all the time. Taylor wasn't responding to Steele's questioning because he was looking over to his right sidewhere his trainer Lou Duva had {foolishly} jumped up to the ring.

    Steele asked Taylor TWICE and he did not respond ONCE so he had no choice but to stop it.

    It is not Steele's fault Taylor looked at Lou Duva and Steele also doesn't know how much time was left in the round and.

    If the fighter does not respond to questions then he HAS to stop it. No other possible choice.It's that simple.
     
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  8. imported_Trojan Horse

    imported_Trojan Horse Juniors

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    When Steele waved off the fight there was actually more than 2 seconds left on the clock. If he'd let him continue Chavez had time to hit him again easily. Just watch it again and look at the on screen clock - The official time was 2:58 into round 12 that Steele called a halt to the fight. It's in the history and record books as that. Taking that into consideration, Chavez may have had one more chance at Taylor {at best} but there is no gaurantee that Taylor would have dropped to thecanvas again, if he had been hit. Taylor was not dazzed from the initial hit/drop. He got straight to his feet well before Steele's mandatory count. Chavez may have hit him again, but the same goes for Taylor hitting Chavez.
    Harold Lederman backed Steele's decision when he was calling the fight for HBO at ringside. - Harold Ledderman's a fool. He screams his useless comments as if they were important. An attention drawer if I've ever seen one. This is the same guy who was laughed at and ridiculedas a commentator from HBO viewers, and due to pressure from audiences, HBO made him the unofficial scorer. They couldn't fire him due to a contract clause so they gave him a job behind the scenes. Have a look at his record over the years as a scorer. He has been way off the ball on many fights.Nobody {or very few people} take this fool as a genuine boxing expert or commentator. That's why he holds the position at HBO he currently does. It's a "no role" position. He may be boxing's most famous judge, but that's the highest fame he'll ever hold.Jim Lampley on the other hand, whowon the Sam Taub Award for "Excellence in Broadcast Journalism" presented by the Boxing Writers Association in 1992 andwon the prestigious1995 Sports Emmy for "Outstanding Sports Journalism" award, among other award and recognitions,saw it completely differently. He wrote and said shortly after the fight {1990}that it was "the most absurd and harsh decision in boxing he has seen in his 16 years associated with the sport." And he still claims that today.Not to mention the remarks he made directly follwing the decision.He isn't alone in his line of thinking. Many respected and admired boxing writers, commentators and general identities agree with Lampley. I, as a boxing fan, do also.
    Steele asked Taylor TWICE and he did not respond ONCE so he had no choice but to stop it. - I agree to a point. But Taylor never looked dazzed or unaware of his surroundings. A good referee {ala Ruby Goldstein, Arthur Mercante, Mills Lane}will always take this into account. Steele never did.He acted abdruptywithout analyzing the situation further. If he had of, he would have seen that Taylor was fullyconscious and aware of his surroundings.Readmore below.
    It is not Steele's fault Taylor looked at Lou Duva and Steele also doesn't know how much time was left in the round and. - Not correct. The ten second clock had gone off, and the ten second light {directly behind the cornerwhere Taylor was standing while Steele was counting him}was glowing its bright red self. Let's assume for one second that Steele didn't hear the clock {though you can clearly hear it on the telecast over all the backround noises}; what is his excuse for not seeing the bright red light directly in his plane of sight without an obstruction,while standing looking at Taylor while counting him out? He had a clear vision of this as it was barely three feet away from him without obstruction, yet in his post fight interview he claimed he not only heard the ten second warning bell, but didn't see the ten second warning light. Or maybe it was the "Don's" hair covering the light?
    If the fighter does not respond to questions then he HAS to stop it. No other possible choice.It's that simple. - I agree to a point. But fighters do not respond to questioning for many different reason. The reason in this fight that Taylor did not respond, simply did not warrant referee Richard Steele calling a halt to the bout.
    Just my opinions and I enjoyed reading yours.


     
  9. El Duque

    El Duque Bench

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    You don't think Taylor looked Dazed. Chavez hit him with a right hand with about 25 seconds left in the round and his knees buckled and he unsteadily went to the corner when he was hit with a crushing right that dropped him.

    Heclambers to his feet when Steele reaches 5 and Steele continues counting till 9 then he asks Taylor twice if he's OK and gets no response.

    Taylor puts up no protest as he's out on his feet and is using the ropes to hold himself up.

    It's Steele's job to protect the fighter and one more hit could've killed Taylor who had taken a massive beating. Chavez ruined Taylor with that beating, not Steele.
     
  10. imported_Trojan Horse

    imported_Trojan Horse Juniors

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    I'll agree that we'll disagree on this. We seem to be going around in circles.
    You have your outake on this fight and I have mine. Richard Steele coupled with Don King ruined Meldrick Taylor's career. Lou Duva didn't help. Not Chavez.
    :)
     
  11. Vertigo

    Vertigo Guest

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    This is a fight I have to see. Good discussion guys.
    Aaron,
    Check out the below link for purchasing fights over the internet. A friend here purchased maybe 40 tapes off him and was very pleased with what he got. I'm not sure he sends overseas, but I beleive he does have the fights on Australia's PAL playback system. It may be worth sending him an email.
    http://championboxing.expage.com/id2.html
    V.
     
  12. ozbash

    ozbash Guest

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    R. Duran VS S.R. Leonard,any of their fights and a good few of clay/ali,s fights before his title was stripped over the vietnam thing.
     
  13. CanadianSteve

    CanadianSteve Guest

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    Leonard-Duran 1 was a great fight. Leonard decided to go toe to toe with the brawler Duran, and he fought a very tough fight. In the re-match, Ray decided to use his speed and skill, and embarassed Duran into the "no mas" ending.

    Ali-Frazier 3, the Thrilla in Manila, was the most destructive fight I've seen. Both fighters were a bit past their prime, but the toughness they showed was unbelievable.
     
  14. El Duque

    El Duque Bench

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    They may not be the best ever but these are a few faves

    Harding-Andries I
    Hagler-Hearns
    Frazier-Ali I

    plus many many more that I couldn't be bothered to think of right now.
     
  15. imported_eels fan...

    imported_eels fan... Juniors

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    Any of Hagler or Chavezs fights. Easily my all time faves &amp; for mine deservedly so.

    Hagler Fights:

    V Mugabi: What Mugabi lacked in class he tripled in power. The guy hit like a semi, this was a good show of "boxing" by Hagler.

    V Leonard: Not one of Haglers better bouts but the whole build up/interviews/fight night is worth it. It was there for the taking but Hagler got sucked in to Leonards game. This is the best show of beating an opponent before you even get in the ring I've ever seen.

    V Hearns: I see this got a couple of mentions already but aside from a brute force POV, it didnt do much for me.

    Julio Cesar Chavez:
    Obviously a statement like this will cause arguments from every corner but for mine he is/was P4P the greatest ever.
    Bias would make me choose all Chavez fights I've seen but as his career comes out of Mexico it's hard to find alot of his earlier bouts. But from what I have seen, in no particular order...

    Mayweather, Comacho, Angel Gonzalez (12rd draw), Whitaker (12rd D).
    The 2 against De La Hoya were worth a watch but it was obvious after 16 &amp; 18 years respectivly Chavezs hands were getting quite heavy. Tszyu was just a way to cash in his chips.

    All time fave Chavez is V Taylor in '90. This is a boxers fight. Power, speed, finesse. I could watch this every day for a year &amp; still be impressed each time.

    Worst fight was watching Randall ruin Chavezs 90W streak.
     
  16. Broncos-fan-baller

    Broncos-fan-baller Juniors

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  17. Atilla'

    Atilla' Juniors

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    Loved it! :)
     
  18. imported_pastor-borderline

    imported_pastor-borderline Juniors

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    LOL

    When Lewis got us, he was reported to have asked "Who won"

    On a side note, the Fan man who interupted Bowe vs Holyfield has committed suicide. I don't think it's an exclusive to the site, but my computer is playing up so I can't be bothered checking the other threads
     

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