Ridiculing the New Age and Conspiracies thread

Discussion in 'Four Corners' started by gUt, Jun 25, 2015.

  1. OVP

    OVP Coach

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    :lol:
    Very true. Fear not the vampire, werewolf or alien. Fear the human being.
     
  2. alien

    alien Referee

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    a remington fireball xp 100 might have been used. it came out around that time and it's small, so it would have been able to hide, and it would have been an easy shot with the scope, and it has the flash when fired

    [​IMG]

    [youtube]tBio6stIGe4[/youtube]

    there was a smell of gun powder behind the pergola and someone who was standing on the side of the road infront of the pergola said he heard a shot from directly behind him
     
  3. gUt

    gUt Coach

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    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-06-21/yoga-guru-courts-controversy-merging-spiritual-and-commercial/7528056

     
  4. alien

    alien Referee

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    riveting
     
  5. gUt

    gUt Coach

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    Ideas lead to beliefs lead to behaviours:

    https://leftbrainrightbrain.co.uk/2...tells-vaxxed-audience-nows-the-time-for-guns/

    Del Bigtree crosses the line: tells Vaxxed audience “Now’s the time” for guns.

    Del Bigtree helped Andrew Wakefield produce a faux documentary called Vaxxed. Vaxxed has been discussed here and elsewhere a great deal, but here is a review from Science Based Medicine if you are looking for more details (Andrew Wakefield’s VAXXED: Antivaccine propaganda at its most pernicious).

    The team that made Vaxxed has been using the screenings as a platform to give personal appearances. Below is a clip from one of those personal appearances. I would encourage you to watch for yourself:

    In case you couldn’t watch or skipped the video, here are the concluding statements of this particular speech by Mr. Bigtree:

    “Anyone who believes in the right to bear arms. To stand up against your government. I don’t know what you were saving that gun for then. I don’t know when you planned on using it if they were going to take control of your own body away.

    It’s now. Now’s the time.”

    We need to stop here and do what neither Polly Tommey nor anyone in that audience had the guts to do: stand up to Del Bigtree and say No! No, this is not the time to use guns.

    This is no joking matter. Bigtree’s comments are at best beyond irresponsible and at worst a call for armed violence.

    Whatever was in Bigtree’s mind, why didn’t anyone speak out against this? There was nervous laughter when Bigtree made his call to arms so people can’t claim they didn’t hear or didn’t understand what he was suggesting. Here’s the Facebook post with the full video. There are over 1500 comments. And I can’t find one that says, “No, Del, we reject a call to violence.”

    I want to keep this short, but I will repeat myself for emphasis: Del Bigtree crossed the line in a big way with his comments. His comments are reprehensible.

    But standing by silent while he makes these reprehensible statements is also wrong.

    Ironically Del Bigtree’s facebook page has this as the top saved image:

    You fans of Del Bigtree, you need to walk the walk. Stop patting yourselves on the back for being “brave” and show that you are indeed brave individuals. Disavow these statements.

    Del Bigtree, you need to dial this back. You need to apologize and take back these statements.

     
  6. gUt

    gUt Coach

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    Scumbag conwoman fails to take her medicine

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-...-disgraced-wellness-blogger-a-no-show/7837894

    Belle Gibson: The Whole Pantry author fails to appear in court for Consumer Affairs action

    A case brought against Belle Gibson by Consumers Affairs Victoria will proceed without her, after the disgraced so-called wellness blogger failed to appear in the Federal Court.

    Ms Gibson built a social media empire around the claim she had survived terminal brain cancer with nutrition and holistic medicine, before admitting she never had the disease.

    Victoria's consumer watchdog launched court action against Ms Gibson last year, saying she falsely claimed she had healed herself naturally when promoting her Whole Pantry app and book.

    In outlining its case, Consumer Affairs Victoria told the court she profited from the false claims and failed to donate money to charity as promised.

    The court had heard Ms Gibson's interview with Channel 9's 60 Minutes program would be used as evidence against her.

    The hearing was told medical documents revealed Ms Gibson had no reasonable basis for believing she had cancer.

    The Whole Pantry app was available for purchase between August 2013 and May 2016, and had been downloaded more than 115,00 times from iTunes.

    The hearing continues.
     
  7. OVP

    OVP Coach

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    A conspiracy theory that someone posted on 4chan. Anyone with enough knowledge of the world care to critique/debunk this one ?

    [​IMG]
     
  8. veggiepatch1959

    veggiepatch1959 First Grade

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    I'm surprised there's been no mention of Martin Bryant yet.

    I'm bitterly disappointed.
     
  9. Shorty

    Shorty Moderator Staff Member

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  10. Collateral

    Collateral Coach

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    Meditation is proven to be a very effective health practice.
     
  11. alien

    alien Referee

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    this is true
     
  12. Bandwagon

    Bandwagon Moderator Staff Member

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    Maybe. how's it on splinters though?
     
    sensesmaybenumbed likes this.
  13. veggiepatch1959

    veggiepatch1959 First Grade

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    So is masturbation....
     
  14. sensesmaybenumbed

    sensesmaybenumbed Moderator Staff Member

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    Everything is a bit of a wank, tbh.
     
  15. sensesmaybenumbed

    sensesmaybenumbed Moderator Staff Member

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    Socialised medicine to the rescue!
     
  16. Shorty

    Shorty Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes MEDITATION, but stretching your sciatic and peroneal nerves is not!
     
  17. alien

    alien Referee

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    [​IMG]
     
  18. sensesmaybenumbed

    sensesmaybenumbed Moderator Staff Member

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    Gosh. That was quick...
     
  19. The Charlatan

    The Charlatan Coach

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    [​IMG]
     
  20. gUt

    gUt Coach

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    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-...ned-for-selling-toxic-apricot-kernels/7965788

    Organic online business the second NSW supplier fined for selling toxic apricot kernels as food
    A Hunter Valley online organic shop has become the second New South Wales business to be fined hundreds of dollars for selling a food once touted as a cyanide-based cancer treatment.

    The sale of apricot kernels as food was banned in December by Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ), killing the $600,000 a year industry.

    Before the ban, FSANZ said about 20,000 kilograms of apricot kernels were sold for human consumption in Australia each year.

    Since the ban, inspectors from the New South Wales Food Safety Authority have been keeping an eye out for illegal sales.

    The authority has revealed a Singleton-based online company, Fourbody, has been fined nearly $900 for selling the kernels illegally.

    The company's online website said it sourced the kernels from Turkey.

    Fourbody did not respond to the ABC's requests for comment.

    Another supplier, Heal Yourself Australia, operating from Greenacre in Sydney, was fined the same amount for selling the kernels illegally earlier this year.

    It too was found to have sold food that did not comply with the requirements of the Food Standards Code.

    Consumer group Choice has previously said the apricot kernels, which are found inside the fruit's stone and look similar to almonds, can be toxic.

    Choice said the kernels contained unsafe levels of hydrocyanic acid and were poisonous if consumed in large quantities.

    Choice reported the apricot kernels had been sold as a miracle cancer cure since the 1950s, under the misguided premise that the cyanide targeted only cancerous cells, leaving healthy cells alone.

    Consumer warning issued about kernels ahead of sale ban
    A previously-released consumer warning by FSANZ highlighted the risks posed by the kernels

    FSANZ chief executive Steve McCutcheon said the kernels were banned for good reason.

    "I think consuming a very small amount of raw apricot kernels can cause potentially life-threatening cyanide poisoning," he said.

    "Apricot kernels contain high levels of a toxin, cynaogenic glycoside, which can release cyanide into the body when eaten."

    Mr McCutcheon said claims about its cancer-curing abilities were unfounded.

    "There certainly has been claims over the years that apricot kernels can be used as an alternative cancer treatment," he said.

    "However, bodies such as Cancer Council Australia have concluded that there is no actual evidence to suggest that statement is true."

    Poisoning incidents reported across the world
    FSANZ previously said there had been reports of poisoning incidents in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the United Kingdom and Europe from eating raw apricot kernels.

    In 2011, a person in Queensland was hospitalised after consuming raw apricot kernels with high levels of cyanide.

    Another person was hospitalised after eating raw apricot kernels in Western Australia in 2014.

    Symptoms of cyanide poisoning include abdominal pain, headache, dizziness, short-term memory loss, confusion, flushing, palpitations and general illness.

    Mr McCutcheon said he was pleased food inspectors had taken action against two businesses for ignoring the ban.

    "Quite often we'll have complaints about particular foods and them being withdrawn from the market," he said.

    "Often we can deal with that through labelling or other information,.

    "But given the acute nature of the risk with apricot kernels, we were very clear about recommending, and ministers agreed with banning from sale in raw [kernels], and with and without skin."

    Cancer Council says eating kernels can be deadly
    At the time of the ban, the Cancer Council applauded the prohibition of apricot kernel sales.

    It said the continuing sale of the kernels as a health food was a major concern, noting the kernels were not only ineffective at treating cancer, but could cause fatal cyanide poisoning.

    Cancer Council Hunter regional manager Shayne Connell said it was not the first time a so-called 'miracle cure' had been marketed to cancer patients.

    "Obviously people promote a whole range of different natural therapies and natural treatments," he said.

    "Certainly the risk, and the health risks and dangers of cyanide poisoning, far outweigh any perceived benefit."

    Mr Connell said it was disappointing to learn about the illegal sales.

    "It's really, really important that people who are either trying to get treatment for their cancer, or to be proactive in their health and reduce their risk of cancer, are given good advice and follow good evidence," he said.

    "So it's really disappointing people are still selling these apricot kernels."

    Some Australian companies still selling kernels
    While Fourbody and Heal Yourself Australia no longer market the sale of apricot kernels, other businesses still offer them online.

    One company sells 500 gram bags of the kernels in Australia for nearly $40 each, compared to as low as $1 a kilogram for kernels imported from Turkey.

    But the product comes with a warning, saying the kernels are sold for cosmetic applications only, and can be toxic if consumed.

    FSANZ does not regulate the use of kernels in cosmetic products, which are unaffected by the ban on selling kernels as a food.
     

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