Willow Cup 2012 :: Bluebags V Penrith :: Week 1

Discussion in 'Forum Sevens Matches' started by joshie, May 20, 2012.

  1. joshie

    joshie Live Update Team

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    [​IMG] -V- [​IMG]

    Match Preview: It is not often that you get to see these two traditional rivals come up against each other in a sudden death match, but when you do, you know all hell is about to break loose. The 'Bags have rebounded to form and will look to capture their second Willow Cup title in three years, while the Panthers are going to do everything in their power to win their first ever title in this format.

    Game Thread:
    * This is a game thread only. Only game posts can be made here - team lists, substitutions, and articles.
    * Any other posts may result in loss of points and is at the discretion of the referee.
    * Only original articles, not used in previous games, will be marked by referees.

    Naming Teams:
    * 3 -V- 3 (+ 4 reserves for both sides)
    * No 'TBA' or changing players named
    * Captains must stick with original teams named


    Rules: http://f7s.leagueunlimited.com/rules.php
    Official Word Counter: http://f7s.leagueunlimited.com/wordcount.php

    Kick Off: Sunday 20th May 2012 (6:00pm AEST)
    Full Time: Wednesday 30th May 2012 (Fulltime is at midnight)
    Referee: Non Terminator
    Venue: Henson Park
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 28, 2012
  2. Big Mick

    Big Mick Referee

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    Penrith team to take on the Bluebags:

    1. Madunit
    2. Leaguenut
    3. Big Mick

    RES:
    4. Abpanther
    5. Broncoman
    6. Maelgwnau
    7. [Furrycat]
     
  3. madunit

    madunit Super Moderator Staff Member

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    madunit for Panthers

    Sheensmentia
    In past weeks, the mental stability of Wests Tigers coach Tim Sheens has deteriorated at such a rapid rate that fans are actually quite concerned for his health, fearing that he is at the onset of dementia.

    I believe it is my duty to make the NRL and its fans fully aware of this illness, the severity of it, and just how advanced it already is for the National coach, so that hopefully procedures and funding can be put in place to help combat this debilitating disease.

    Below listed are the ten warning signs which are commonly found in dementia sufferers and the supporting evidence proving categorically that Sheens himself is at the onset and needs help.

    1. Recent memory loss that affects day to day functions

    Tasks which in the past had seemed second nature or obvious simply become forgotten. In Sheens case this is proven by his absent mindedness since 2007 to sign a halfback. Further supporting evidence is his lack to sign a functioning fullback since 2009 and forgetting to put the team list in on time every Tuesday afternoon. Even just a few weeks ago, he clean forgot Daly Cherry-Evans was sitting on the interchange bench for Australia.

    2. Difficulty performing familiar tasks

    In recent years that has been most noticeable since Sheens was unable to figure out how to walk down steps by himself, hence why he now sits on the sideline with the players as opposed to in the coaches box.

    3. Problems with language

    The last two years Sheens, usually one very precise with his use of English, has used explicit language in press conferences. This is a clear sign of the frustration he is suffering through a lack of mental clarity.

    4. Disorientation to time and place

    Previous years has revealed the disorientation Sheens suffers. This year he thought he was coaching Parramatta and had extended the contracts of Joel Reddy and Tom Humble. Even as far back as 2004, he thought he was still coach at Penrith, having signed up Shane Elford, Ben Reynolds, Scott Sattler, as well as Paul Whatuira in 2005 and Danny Galea in 2007.

    5. Poor or decreased judgement

    Sheens’ judgement has seen the most noticeable decrease. This year alone he has decided that Centre Chris Lawrence is a five-eighth, five-eighth Benji Marshall is a halfback, half Tom Humble is a hooker, half Tim Moltzen is a fullback, winger Lote Tuqiri has hands and even believes that Adam Blair does exist, so much so that he invests half a million dollars a year into this weird mythology.

    6. Problems with abstract thinking

    The inability to think on the run, or outside the box have been essentially null in 2012 from Sheens. Most notably, when he brings a replacement player on the field, he moves about 7 players from their current positions into new positions that they aren’t used to. Each subsequent interchange leads to more and more positional reshuffles.

    7. Misplacing things

    Many things have gone missing recently for Sheens. The Tuesday team lists (as mentioned earlier) is one that has happened on a consistent basis. Another has been Junior Moors, who clearly should be in the Tigers 17 every week, but Sheens just keeps forgetting to pick him.

    8. Changes in mood or behaviour

    Just recently Sheens has been happy with his team when they’ve lost, and irate at them when they have won. He’s contradicted himself in the space of just a few minutes in press conferences as well.

    9. Changes in personality

    Sheens had for long been his own man, unconcerned about the views and opinions of others. But over past years he’s been angered by comments made by the media and even by the fans, actually lashing out at them just two years ago, calling those Tigers supporters critical of Sheens "so-called fans". This year he let Ricky Stuart’s opinion also get him worked up.

    10. Loss of initiative

    This has been another area that has affected Sheens severely this year. He hasn’t even bothered this year to create any set plays in attack or bothered to create any structure for the defensive unit


    As you can see, Sheens is suffering from all of the classic early stages of Dementia. It is recommended that Sheens be stood down from all coaching duties and admitted to an aged care facility at the earliest convenience, so as to provide carers and specialists maximum time to assist Tim with his disease.

    Thank You.

    748 words, including title.

    Source:

    Website: - www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au
     
  4. Drew-Sta

    Drew-Sta Moderator Staff Member

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    [​IMG]
    NEWTOWN BLUEBAGS
    1. Drew-Sta
    2. Timmah
    3. rexxy

    Reserves:
    4. Cliffhanger
    5. muzby


    Best of luck Penny's! :)
     
  5. Drew-Sta

    Drew-Sta Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi guys!

    Rexxy is subbed out, Cliffhanger is subbed in.

    Any issues, PM me :)
     
  6. Cliffhanger

    Cliffhanger Coach

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    Choking
    Most of us- apart from maybe Saint George fans- can agree on a rough definition of what choking in sport is. It is more or less when a skilled athlete performs well below their ability at an important event. Not only do they fail to go as well as expected and their capabilities would allow, but they also struggle with the tasks that are generally so basic. When a Rugby League player chokes, not only does their performance progressively deteriorate but, they also become unable to regain control of their performance.

    I do not think anybody would disagree with the observation that Todd Carney choked last Wednesday night. His kicks were off, he went missing during several points of the match and whenever he did something even remotely useful for his side, he would negate it with an error. It was a big game, there was high expectation on Carney and he had the skills to deliver the type of performance expected from him, but it appeared the pressure got the better of him. However, it is not enough to say Carney choked because the pressure was too high, choking is much more complex than what we can discern by watching the game.

    Research into the process of choking and exactly what happens to the athlete when he or she experiences it, reveal that it is not all psychological. When a player chokes, not only does their attitude shift, but, they experience muscle tension, an elevated heart rate and increased respiration. These factors impact on everything, from their coordination, their speed, their strength, some athletes have even reported their vision becoming narrowed on these occasions. These physiological effects make it harder for a player to get back on track without some sort of intervention.

    What causes choking? While the process of choking has both psychological and physiological effects, the cause is psychological. There are two main theories that attempt to explain why athletes choke under pressure, the distraction theory and the skill focus theory. The distraction theory proposes that an athlete chokes because their mind becomes preoccupied with other thoughts not related to the job at hand. From a distractions theory perspective, Carney may have choked because he was thinking about how a good performance may secure him a spot as NSW five-eighth, instead of focusing on getting that goal kick over the crossbar. Situation-related thoughts will start to compete with the attention needed to execute a particular play and performance suffers. In contrast, the skill focus theory proposes that players choke because they become too focused on the task at hand, what this does is take the automatic element of completing a task. From a skill focus perspective, Todd Carney missed that kick because he did not allow the motions to just flow, by focusing on a step by step process, Carney was unable to execute the play the way he normally would and thus missed the goal, so when he became overly focused on what is usually a rather automatic process he was no longer able to land the conversion. There are merits to both these theories and I am sure most of us can see how it is possible Carney may have experienced either.

    So what can be done to alleviate choking? This is a question which sport psychologists and coaches are desperately trying to tackle. Some sport psychologists believe trying to wipe out choking entirely is unrealistic and rather, we should look at what type of interventions can be employed during a match to try and stop this downward spiral. For example, perhaps at half-time Carney should have monitored his tension levels and used some sort of relaxation procedure to alleviate that tension. Peak performance is all about establishing that optimal level of arousal. Being over or under aroused will always lead to a sub-par performance as this has the greatest impact on attention. Players become susceptible to choking when their attention is not at levels it should be during a match, and while these situations cannot be entirely avoided, it seems they can be successfully managed. Perhaps nobody put it better than firebrand tennis champion John McEnroe:“When it comes to choking, the bottom line is that everyone does it. The question isn’t whether you choke or not, but how- when you choke- are you going to handle it? Choking is a big part of sport and a part of being a champion is being able to handle it better than anyone else.”
     
  7. Big Mick

    Big Mick Referee

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    Big Mick hitting the ball up for the Panthers!


    How to build a Champion

    We have all heard the cliché about how a champion team will beat a team of champions, but have you ever wondered why? How does a team full of stars lose to a team of nobodies? For example, the 2003 Panthers side defeating the Roosters or the 2005 Tigers team defeating the highly fancied Cowboys or the 2006 Bronco’s defeating Melbourne.
    So what does it take to be a champion team?

    1. Passion – All truly successful teams have something that sets them apart from others. It is the desire and energy that fuels them to reach their playing potential. A team with passion does not build individual pride, it builds team spirit. Without it no team will succeed.

    2. Confidence – Rugby League is so often described as a game of confidence. Vince Lombardi once stated teams defeat defeatism with confidence. The man who is trained to peak capacity will gain confidence. Confidence is contagious, as is a lack of confidence, but a team cannot just expect confidence, it must be built through preparation.

    3. Mental Application – So much of being a champion team is mental toughness. A team who succeeds avoids the hot seat and established authority. If a team is surrounded by an environment encouraging this trait, it would understand toughness is about sacrifice and self denial, as well as the combined team state of mind to never back down and give an inch. This is what wins grand finals.

    4. Self Belief – If a team doesn’t believe they can win, then quite simply they won’t. Unless a team truly believes they are the best, they will never have the ambition and will to strive for that goal. The truth of life is that a team’s limits are only self imposed by what the mind is given to believe. If a man pushes beyond the limits of his capabilities and still succeeds, it is a true reflection of overcoming adversity.

    5. Responsibility and Loyalty –As Jack Gibson once said, “success begins in the front office”, responsibility should be imbedded in any club. A team that loses together should win together. To be a champion team, the team must accept the responsibility of losing, and share the glory of success. A team built on a sense of oneness, of dependence of one another with have the strength to win by being derived in unity. The aim is not to aim for it all, but rather be prepared to sacrifice.

    6. Effort and commitment- While a team may have the above traits, no team will generate success without the complete effort and commitment of the players both on and off the football field. It is an old saying that if you cheat at training, you cheat in the game, and if you cheat at the game, you cheat in life. The effort and commitment of a team starts with how hard you are willing to work to achieve your goal, without these traits, a team is doomed. A team shouldn’t approach training as working harder than the guy next to them, it should be a team mentality to work harder than everyone.

    7. Community – A team that bonds together wins together. In 2003, a young Penrith team won the title against the odds, attributing their win to a sense of community and a willingness to die for each other on the field of battle. This sense of community must be constant throughout a team for it to be a success.

    8. Leadership – A quality leader brings into alignment all their stated and practiced views in order to set an example for those around them. Petero Civoniceva is a leader whom would not demand integrity from his men, but would lead with integrity and his men would follow. A good leader will share their vision of success and generate commitment of his players. All great teams had great leaders and no team in the future will win without one.

    Vince Lombardi once stated that any team’s finest hour, their greatest fulfilment of all they hold dear, is the moment when they have worked their hearts out in a good cause and lie exhausted on the field of battle – victorious, as Penrith’s 2003 grand final team felt.

    After reflecting on these simple traits, ask yourself, does your team have them? Does your team have the will to excel and the will to win it all? I guess we’ll find out in October.

    744 Words (OWC)
     
  8. LeagueNut

    LeagueNut First Grade

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    LeagueNut - Panthers

    Playing God

    I know I shouldn’t have done it.

    You know that tiny little rush you get when you’ve gotten away with something ever so slightly evil? Well sometimes that rush sticks around and reminds you how good it felt – before you know it you’re pushing the boundaries of social normality once more for those few seconds of bliss.

    As usual, it started out innocently enough. Just a few “experiments” that weren’t supposed to go anywhere … until the results got out. I suppose I was a victim of my own success – if it hadn’t gone so damn well to start with I’d never have ended up in this cell.

    Splicing human DNA hasn’t really hit the mainstream just yet. That’s why it was surprising to be approached in the first place – it’s hardly a service you’d see advertised in the Yellow Pages. I had a reputation for knowing my way around a test tube and apparently for the desperate club CEOs looking for the “next big thing”, that was enough of an endorsement.

    Part of the attraction for the CEOs was that it became another way to keep ex-players on their books. It’s hard to pay a retired star a six-figure sum every year for doing sweet f**k-all, but by taking the term “a pound of flesh” a bit too literally they were able to concoct the most elaborately beautiful tax dodges in history.

    A lot of the time I wasn’t even told who or what I was dealing with. A young “star” would be wheeled in to the clubs medical rooms under the guise of needing some minor procedure completed, normally something bland like an ingrown toenail removed. All I had to do was swoop in, inject the DNA compound and get out again. I never even knew whose DNA it was – I was just doing what I was told, blinded somewhat by the giant green dollar signs in my eyes.

    It wasn’t until some clubs started calling me back to fix some “abnormalities” that I became aware of the full extent of my actions. Now you’ll have to excuse me – I’m not much of a Rugby League fan, so the players names are all foreign to me. You’ll just have to make do with my best descriptions.

    That Kiwi club over the ditch called me in one day. From what I can figure out they gave me one of their brightest young stars who had plenty of speed but not a lot of Rugby League nous. I gave him a decent “dose” from a former club captain, who I understand was an Australian rep player. But instead of boosting his playing abilities, he suddenly spent all his time dressed in floral shirts and hanging around the casino. Almost overnight he’d become a lost cause.

    There’s another club up around Hunter way. I don’t go up there any more – every time I tried to help one of their junior stars with a bit of splicing from a local legend, their eyes would almost instantly turn bright red and they’d make these horrible snorting sounds.

    There was an inner-city club that thought they’d “boost” a handful of their better players with the “help” of their retiring captain-cum-coach. I never tested it properly but I’m sure that DNA mixture was about 90% proof. That poor tattooed guy they had for a while didn’t stand a chance.

    So I’ll happily take my punishment but I can no longer do it quietly. It’s time this evil practice was stopped for good. I know I’m not the only one out there who clubs have called on for this service, and the others are a lot more reckless than I am.

    There’s a few cases I’ve heard about that should concern us all. That Sharks tough guy has got more needle holes in him now than any junkie you’ve ever seen, and if that giant Bulldogs prop doesn’t stop growing soon he’s going to do a great impersonation of Mr Creosote all over ANZ Stadium. I’ve also got a nagging feeling that Mr Dreadlocks from the Titans might have had the wrong “sample” injected into him, because somewhere along the way my ex-college roommate Eugene lost a jar of Dolly Parton from his private collection.

    Please – make it stop.

    714 words
     
  9. Drew-Sta

    Drew-Sta Moderator Staff Member

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    Drew-Sta for the Bags!

    [​IMG]

    Opportunity

    I've been honestly sitting here trying to write an article for the last three hours. No luck. There's a certain pressure to these things, but I'm at the stage where I think I need to write from my heart.

    I've been in Tonga for about 10 months. In my time here, I've played football twice a week with a bunch of 'palangi's*' and Tongans. The games are the highlight of my week. I love getting out there and mixing it up with the locals and some mates of mine.

    Tonga is a funny place. It's technically a third world nation, or 'developing country' as the politically correct call it. Living here has taught me a lot about myself, but also about what it is to be human. I feel more at ease here with a simpler lifestyle than I do in Sydney. Most importantly, I do without; I have no car, I have less gadgets, I have no gel - things like this I go without because I don't need them.

    Over time I've noticed something though. I've noticed the difference in the Tongan's mentality. Having lived on this tropical island for a while now, I really don't want to come home. But the Tongans - well, they can't wait to leave. Their attitude in this regard has been a little curious. But I think I've begun to work it out. It's a matter of opportunity.

    What do I mean by that?

    Frankly, I have what they want. I have the chance to go home when I want. I have the opportunity to earn bucket loads of cash they dream about. I have the luxury of good health care. I can drive down a road without there being a thousand potholes in it.

    I've got the opportunity. They, on the other hand, do not.

    And that's big here. It's big because Tongan culture places great emphasis on status. The higher you are in society, the more opportunity you get. As a palangi, though, I have opportunity without status, and that makes me special.

    It makes me special because I can do things with it. I can progress in my life, I have a certain control over my fate that the Tongan's don't. I have education, know-how, money, and a country that wants to see people succeed - I have everything Tonga doesn't.

    And this is the hardest part of living here. Each time I go to footy I catch up with a friend, Jo. Jo works for Coca-Cola 6 days a week. He's a guy who has to work 6 days a week to feed his family. He works quite hard too, for a Tongan. But when the guy comes to footy, he puts it all to bed and has fun. He laughs, he enjoys, he runs - he's a damn good player.

    I asked him 'Why don't you play on the weekend? Why don't you play in the competitions?'

    He smiles sadly and tells me 'I have to work.'

    A friend of his, Tavake, tells me Jo gave up a shot at the Tongan rugby league team because he's the only breadwinner in the family. His mother has to take care of the house and the rest of the kids. His father passed away, and nobody can till the land for their little farm. As a result, the chips have fallen to Jo. He works for the family and keeps them fed.

    Tavake tells me Jo would have played for Tonga if he made himself available for selection.

    'But he doesn't have the opportunity to play because he works so much.'

    That word, opportunity, keeps popping up all the time. The kids lack opportunity to progress their skills at school because they are dragged away by important life stuff. Talented twenty-something’s like Jo are forced to pass up the opportunity to trial with a national team because if he doesn't, his family won't eat.

    I genuinely wonder if Australian rugby league players realise the opportunity they hold in the palms of their hand as they run out onto the field each week. Because the reality of the matter is that it isn't so much the talent that has seen them succeed; it's the opportunity that allowed them to develop the talent in the first place. I hope more NRL players realise the privileged opportunity they have to feed their family whilst doing what they love, rather than having to choose between the two.
     
  10. joshie

    joshie Live Update Team

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    Game over.
     
  11. Non Terminator

    Non Terminator Coach

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    Penrith Panthers - 259

    Madunit - Sheensmentia (748 OWC)
    This article lightly (and without offense, yes, this is a touchy subject to many) combines the warning signs of dementia with fallen Wests coach Tim Sheens. As said, it is done with a light touch of humour, combined with the frustrations of a football club. It is an interesting read, and written very well. Strangest use of the Source Guide I've ever seen...
    86

    Big Mick - How To Build A Champion (744 OWC)
    What is it with Penrith and numbering this week? It's kinda cool. A good article spreading on what is required to build a solid team and take the grand prize. So many occasions where every single point would be valid, whether it be a decider or just any general game. A well written article.
    87

    LeagueNut - Playing God (715 OWC)
    Note: You gave me 714 for the word count.
    A wicked article, a bit humerous regarding the idea of splicing regulars into superstars. It flowed well and gave us something we could read over and find something different, if that makes sense. A nice, fun little read.
    86

    Newtown Bluebags - 176

    Cliffhanger - Choking (749 OWC)
    Note: You gave me 748 for the word count.
    This article gives us an indepth look at the psychological mentality combined with choking, with extremely good research and quotations involved. There were some errors "McEnroe:"When" being one, keep an eye out, I know you were close to the limit. Otherwise a very good read, and one outside the box a bit.
    87

    Drew-Sta - Opportunity (741 OWC)
    Note: You gave me nothing for the word count.
    I will say one thing and only one thing. Get this article printed somewhere. It's a shame to see so much greed in this competition, and every player has nearly been hit by it in one way or another. It is a lovely article.
    89
    Penrith d. Newtown 259-176 (POTM Drew-Sta)
     
  12. madunit

    madunit Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Cheers NT.
     
  13. Cliffhanger

    Cliffhanger Coach

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    Thanks NT. Congrats Panthers.

    Sorry we didn't get all three in.
     
  14. Drew-Sta

    Drew-Sta Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks NT, I'd love to get it printed if only someone would give it a chance! :) Sorry for the lack of a 3rd. Tim had some stuff crop up which prevented him from getting the third in.

    Thanks for article too Cliffy, really good read and I loved it.
     

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