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Melbourne Storm alleged incident

The NRL has been made aware of a video on social media that allegedly shows Melbourne Storm players in a room where there is a white substance on a table.

Nine journalist Danny Weidler tweeted, "(it's) too early to say investigation launched", but the integrity unit has been notified.

"Having seen the video it's not a great look," Weidler said.

"Another concern is they have been betrayed by people in the room with them."

News Corp reports the video shows two Storm players in a room which has at least six people in it, including the person filming.

The Storm were bundled out of the premiership race on Saturday in a 10-6 loss to Penrith.


MOD NOTE: Do not post the video, and do not name names.
 
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Canard

Referee
Messages
28,958
Not during off season they can’t - strict rules in place via RLPA agreement…. Players aren’t even supposed to be contacted by anyone in the game for a certain period of time during their 10 weeks off.
Any link to this claim? Sounds ridiculously unlikely.
 

Canard

Referee
Messages
28,958
For those who over indulge, don't do it responsibly, just like anything it can turn bad. Drinking, gambling, eating fast food can all get ya in trouble too if you go overboard.

These guys don't have drug problems if it is indeed drugs.

Their families aren't going hungry because of it, they're not stealing to facilitate their use, they were in a private hotel and made no trouble and they aren't "unproductive zombies who do fook all, all day but thieve money off of hard working people".

They just presumably/allegedly indulge in a different drug to you which isn't legal yet but a staple of most nights out. It's "illegal" but it's so easily attainable and accepted it hardly feels like it. Just don't let the cops see it you're all good.
Class As are drugs of dependencies however, and there are many examples of people going off the rails and getting addicted.

I think we need to be more open about this sort of thing as a society, and I don't think downplaying it's effects, or trying to moralise by saying "everyone does it" helps anyone.
 

myrrh ken

First Grade
Messages
9,091
I don't get how the league can suspend them. If everyone has to say white powder because they can't prove 100% it's cocaine how does the league have the authority to fine and suspend them???
Balance of probabilities vs beyond reasonable doubt is how
 
Messages
1,184
I think a lot of people are missing the point here.........trying to mount an argument that it should be okay to take drugs. The real point here is that these guys are meant to, and very well paid to be professional athletes and they are carrying on like amateurs. Then they trot out the old "but we are young and should be able to have fun" line. That one makes me laugh. Cant have the cake and eat it too boys. If you want to be a professional sportsman then behave like one....its that simple really! If you don't then the consequences must follow.
 

betcats

Referee
Messages
22,079
Storm should've kept Hynes and let merkinster go. He goes missing in big games more then he plays well and he is no leader that is for sure, not a good influence on young guys either. Done very little without a future immortal holding his hand.
 

_Johnsy

Referee
Messages
25,467
Not during off season they can’t - strict rules in place via RLPA agreement…. Players aren’t even supposed to be contacted by anyone in the game for a certain period of time during their 10 weeks off
Not entirely true.
ASADA are a different ball game alltogether. They have legislated federal government powers to test any professional athlete anywhere anytime.

Sport Integrity Australia Act 2020
NATIONAL ANTI-DOPING FRAMEWORK

The national anti doping framework sets out:
Testing of athletes Under its enabling legislation ASADA may collect samples in Australia from athletes who compete in a sport with an anti-doping policy. ASADA may also be contracted by third parties (including state and territory governments) to undertake testing on their behalf. Where a state or territory government agency becomes aware of a possible anti-doping rule violation, it should be promptly reported to ASADA, where appropriate and feasible.
 

Perth Red

Immortal
Messages
44,441
For those who over indulge, don't do it responsibly, just like anything it can turn bad. Drinking, gambling, eating fast food can all get ya in trouble too if you go overboard.

These guys don't have drug problems if it is indeed drugs.

Their families aren't going hungry because of it, they're not stealing to facilitate their use, they were in a private hotel and made no trouble and they aren't "unproductive zombies who do fook all, all day but thieve money off of hard working people".

They just presumably/allegedly indulge in a different drug to you which isn't legal yet but a staple of most nights out. It's "illegal" but it's so easily attainable and accepted it hardly feels like it. Just don't let the cops see it you're all good.
Cough ben cousins cough. Plenty of examples of where a little rec use can lead.
 

Walpole

Juniors
Messages
1,917
Cheese and his mates can take as many drugs as they want, they're hardly performance enhancing and the season's over, but you'd think Melbourne might want to know what their employees, who are highly paid to stay in good physical condition, are putting into their bodies.
 

Munky

Bench
Messages
4,724
Cheese and his mates can take as many drugs as they want, they're hardly performance enhancing and the season's over, but you'd think Melbourne might want to know what their employees, who are highly paid to stay in good physical condition, are putting into their bodies.

Don't both appear in commercials for TPAs?

You'd think protecting their personal brand would be a priority.
 

Penrose Warrior

First Grade
Messages
7,489
Everything is illegal in Australia. No one has the right to tell an adult what they can and can't put into their own bodies. If they are not cheating...who cares. The fact there is a time amount of white powder on a table and this makes national news is such a fkn joke....but that's Australia.

Who is so important to sit there is a suit and says yes you can put alcohol in your body or can smoke but you are a criminal if you smoke a plant or sniff a powder or swallow a pill into your own body?

Most countries are smartening up and getting with the times and legalizing for personal use because current legalisation makes no sense and is stuck in the dark ages.

The only people that are against it being legalised are criminal groups, politicians, customs and cops because it makes them all rich and/or provides them with high paying jobs which are a complete waste of time and funded by tax payers. Oh and Karens and sheep watching the news and believe and follow everything the government and media says.

The war on drugs is a complete farce that has failed but continues to make a lot of people rich so it will never stop.
Oh yep, which countries are legalising cocaine - may we ask? Actually, I did my own research...Colombia, Mexico and Peru. And a couple of others decriminalising it.

Look at the impact cocaine had on the NBA in the 1980s. It f**ked up so many players around that time. Len Bias died from an OD. These guys had disposable income and the contacts to get it, and were into it like a rat up a drain pipe. It f**ked their lives up.

So yeah, sometimes people need to be saved from themselves with laws that prevent them from becoming hopeless addicts and f**king up themselves, their families and their communities.
 

myrrh ken

First Grade
Messages
9,091
Oh yep, which countries are legalising cocaine - may we ask? Actually, I did my own research...Colombia, Mexico and Peru. And a couple of others decriminalising it.

Look at the impact cocaine had on the NBA in the 1980s. It f**ked up so many players around that time. Len Bias died from an OD. These guys had disposable income and the contacts to get it, and were into it like a rat up a drain pipe. It f**ked their lives up.

So yeah, sometimes people need to be saved from themselves with laws that prevent them from becoming hopeless addicts and f**king up themselves, their families and their communities.
Hmm. Do you reckon the issue was with cocaine or all the shit that's cut into it? Do you reckon regulating it might make the coke better
 

Penrose Warrior

First Grade
Messages
7,489
Hmm. Do you reckon the issue was with cocaine or all the shit that's cut into it? Do you reckon regulating it might make the coke better
With the NBA players? Dunno, I just figured it was the coke, the dopamine dependency it created and what it did to people's bloodstream that f**ked them up. You're never going to regulate it anyway, you have multi-billion dollar cartels running the show that have more power than any lettuce leaf government has.

Drugs ARE bad, mmkay.
 

Knight76

Juniors
Messages
1,853
For those who over indulge, don't do it responsibly, just like anything it can turn bad. Drinking, gambling, eating fast food can all get ya in trouble too if you go overboard.

These guys don't have drug problems if it is indeed drugs.

Their families aren't going hungry because of it, they're not stealing to facilitate their use, they were in a private hotel and made no trouble and they aren't "unproductive zombies who do fook all, all day but thieve money off of hard working people".

They just presumably/allegedly indulge in a different drug to you which isn't legal yet but a staple of most nights out. It's "illegal" but it's so easily attainable and accepted it hardly feels like it. Just don't let the cops see it you're all good.

Even if that were all true. They represent the Storm and the NRL and I am sure they have clauses in place to cover this stuff. Mitchell Pearce never actually rooted that dog but got done regardless.

Further to this, the drug (if it was a drug) is currently illegal whether you agree with that or not. If the NRL did nothing about it they would be seen to be accepting and even endorsing the use of illegal substances.

Sponsors have their say also and need to uphold clean family friendly images.

There is no point arguing the morality of drug use, legalising it etc etc with anyone either way. Because the other side will never agree.

The fact is, it is illegal currently, if they have snorted coke or not should be decided by a drug test regardless of it they say now it was icing sugar or coke. Then, whatever ramifications happen from there so be it.

And finally, these blokes don't have to play league and put their hand out for hundreds of thousands of dollars per year to do so. But they do, and that comes with responsibility. Otherwise, they can go and do whatever low profile career they want and nobody would give a crap if they snort talcum powder or not.
 

Generalzod

Referee
Messages
26,987
Drugs tear families apart, dissolves friendships, and turns ppl into unproductive zombies who do fook all, all day but thieve money off of hard working people.

Need I mention those who have been so screwed up to get money for crack, that even family members have been brutally murdered because of attempts to sponge money off them?

I see ppl affected by drugs every day to the point that I pity them, yet they make me sick to my stomach.

So yea footy75, there is more than enough blame to go around.
Not just illegal drugs, how many stories do you hear of families torn apart by alcohol..
 

Perth Red

Immortal
Messages
44,441
Not just illegal drugs, how many stories do you hear of families torn apart by alcohol..
true but that horse has bolted. If anything it proves the more accessible and socially acceptable something is the more people will consume it, another argument for not legalising narcotics.
Munster at 27, highest paid player at the club and expecting a baby must have rocks in his head. He never did come across as the brightest tool in the shed tbf.
 

Generalzod

Referee
Messages
26,987
true but that horse has bolted. If anything it proves the more accessible and socially acceptable something is the more people will consume it, another argument for not legalising narcotics.
Munster at 27, highest paid player at the club and expecting a baby must have rocks in his head. He never did come across as the brightest tool in the shed tbf.
it not abou5 being the brightest tool in the shed, it’s the enviroment that he is in, highly paid access to those kind of things.
 

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