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Parramatta Eels Juniors

Gronk

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Player Points Index System to go statewide in 2022​

AuthorNSWRLTimestampWed 20 Oct 2021, 04:32 PM

The NSWRL will next season introduce a state-wide Player Points Index System (PPIS) for the first time across Regional and Metropolitan Open Age competitions which will encourage former NRL stars to give back to the communities that kickstarted their careers.​

The PPIS, which has been a work in progress for the past 12 months and forms part of the NSWRL One State Strategic Plan, will also reward junior development and player loyalty as well as improve talent equalisation across NSW-based competitions.

NSWRL Head of Football Robert Lowrie said the PPIS, which will apply to Open Age competitions including the Ron Massey Cup and Sydney Shield in metropolitan Sydney as well as all Group competitions across Regional NSW, would have a positive impact on the game.
“The PPIS is a grassroots system that ensures the sustainability of clubs in competitions across the state while encouraging the promotion of their players along pathways at all levels,” Lowrie said.
“It’s important to have a system across NSW that encourages all players to stay loyal to their local community, and to reward those clubs which are building a strong nucleus within their roster based on junior and local development.”
The PPIS includes a Notional Principal Contracts Allowance for former NRL stars to have their points recalculated to a notional value as their return has a positive impact on the club, competition and community.
“A prominent example of a local junior incentive would be former Parramatta Eels five-eighth Daniel Mortimer, who played almost 150 NRL games including the 2009 Grand Final and is now captain-coach of Orange CYMS,” Lowrie said.
“As Daniel came through the junior ranks at CYMS club, he would be considered a zero-point player in recognition of his development.”
Other aspects of the PPIS framework of rules and principles include:
- a player will have their playing history for their past five seasons (2017-21) considered for categorisation purposes;
- a player will be categorised at the highest level they have played in the past five seasons;
- a player must not play any less than five competition matches (in any one season) to be correspondingly categorised at that level;

- categories for developing, graded, representative, Major Competition and Elite Competition players;
- participating clubs shall attribute a point value to each player;
- a sliding scale points system based on ladder position, with teams finishing higher having reduced points and teams in the bottom half having full points.
The system also has allowances for clubs in smaller populated towns, like Jamberoo Super Roos in Group 7 or a Nyngan Tigers in Group 11.
“Each club across Community Football is unique in their makeup, they all have different strengths that help build their culture and drive their community support and competitive spirit,” Lowrie said.
“Our smaller clubs are often the clubs with the strongest community.”
For more than two decades various Leagues across NSW have been utilising the player points system model specific to the needs of their local competitions, but the new system will provide a consistent document gazetted for application across the state.
“I would like to thank Greater Western and South Western Zone Manager David Skinner and the working group who put in many hours developing the PPIS,” Lowrie said.
“They had to combine the strengths of systems from various Groups and Leagues across the state to bring them all on to the same page.
“I am confident it will play a significant role as part of the NSWRL One State Strategic Plan in helping administer Rugby League across NSW more efficiently, provide more opportunities to assist clubs with recruitment and retention, and set the game up for success for generations to come.”

Click here for the PPIS document .

 

Gronk

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The Telecrap NRL podcast released today had me fuming as they talked about a rookie draft and how the poor clubs who are shit need all the good juniors.

Rothfield & Co were suggesting that every good kid should go to the shit clubs first etc. Good luck if Penrith Brisbane and Parra stop tipping in the cash and expertise into pathways.
 

Poupou Escobar

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The Roosters, Storm and Souths spend plenty on pathways as well. The local junior comp or high school footy isn't pathways.
 

Gronk

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The Roosters, Storm and Souths spend plenty on pathways as well. The local junior comp or high school footy isn't pathways.
Yes they do. My point is the spending will cease if players from Ball up automatically go into a draft.
 

T-Boon

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The Telecrap NRL podcast released today had me fuming as they talked about a rookie draft and how the poor clubs who are shit need all the good juniors.

Rothfield & Co were suggesting that every good kid should go to the shit clubs first etc. Good luck if Penrith Brisbane and Parra stop tipping in the cash and expertise into pathways.
Isnt it the leagues clubs that spend the money on juniors rather than the football clubs? They have to support local league it is in their constitution.
 

Joshuatheeel

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Isnt it the leagues clubs that spend the money on juniors rather than the football clubs? They have to support local league it is in their constitution.
From experience the NRL clubs don’t do much in running the local area junior comps (or contribute much of the running costs), it’s mainly run by volunteers. Along with maybe a permanent employee and the NRL development officers occasionally helping out.

One example the home team pays the refs for the day not the NRL club. Junior clubs backed by a leagues can however reduce rego fees as they have greater financial backing.

Panthers, Eels and co help out with the development of players not by running the local comps but having development squads (see how much the eels named this year). And giving these players some help in developing thus hopefully developing more NRL players. This wouId be paid for by the NRL clubs (with the leagues club contributing to the NRL club as required).
 

T-Boon

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From experience the NRL clubs don’t do much in running the local area junior comps (or contribute much of the running costs), it’s mainly run by volunteers. Along with maybe a permanent employee and the NRL development officers occasionally helping out.

One example the home team pays the refs for the day not the NRL club. Junior clubs backed by a leagues can however reduce rego fees as they have greater financial backing.

Panthers, Eels and co help out with the development of players not by running the local comps but having development squads (see how much the eels named this year). And giving these players some help in developing thus hopefully developing more NRL players. This wouId be paid for by the NRL clubs (with the leagues club contributing to the NRL club as required).

Thanks. It doesn't sound like their contributions would be missed very much.
 

Delboy

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Thanks. It doesn't sound like their contributions would be missed very much.
Not sure of the exact distribution but the Leagues club provide funding close to $150 k each year direct to the junior league. Some of the referees costs is covered and they have assisted in some ground assistance and council requests.

The gear for all development players is provided as is the tshirt, ball and water bottles to all participants at the junior league gala day .

Understand those expenses which are allocated to junior development etc within the Parramata district is close or above $1.5 million per annum, certainly was prior to COVID.

Souths Juniors lead the way as they cover all registration and insurance costs for every team in their junior competition and shirts, socks and shorts. Then again that was their charter when set up, not the senior club.
 

Joshuatheeel

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Thanks. It doesn't sound like their contributions would be missed very much.
I reckon it wouId be, who is going to identify the juniors and develop them ?

For example the Steelers have named a 40 men matt’s and SG ball squads. Some of these players will be a year young for the age group.

Additionally they also support an Andrew Johns and Laurie Daley cup sides (16’s and 18’s). They use this squads for players missing out of the matt’s / ball squads, as well as a pathway for under age players (eg 16 year olds for Matt’s which is under 17).

So you are probably looking at 60 or so players in the 17’s and another 60 or so in the under 19’s, all getting exposure to NRL supported training / facilities.

BTW - the dragons also have their own Matt’s / Ball side, so the NRL dragons have probably 90-100 kids in each age group.

So if the Dragons weren’t involved in junior development, who wouId look after these kids development ? Who wouId pay for it? Where does the resources and facilities come from? Who identifies the kids?
 

Poupou Escobar

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From experience the NRL clubs don’t do much in running the local area junior comps (or contribute much of the running costs), it’s mainly run by volunteers. Along with maybe a permanent employee and the NRL development officers occasionally helping out.

One example the home team pays the refs for the day not the NRL club. Junior clubs backed by a leagues can however reduce rego fees as they have greater financial backing.

Panthers, Eels and co help out with the development of players not by running the local comps but having development squads (see how much the eels named this year). And giving these players some help in developing thus hopefully developing more NRL players. This wouId be paid for by the NRL clubs (with the leagues club contributing to the NRL club as required).
Yeah as I understood it, the affiliation between the NRL club and the local competition is notional. The NRL club allows the local comp and its clubs to use its branding. That's why we can't complain when rival NRL clubs sign players from the local area or Mounties whores itself out as the NSW Cup affiliate to other NRL clubs. The Eels don't own any of them and nor should we. We need all that money for boosting the NRL team, not underwriting kids sport so that the likes of the Roosters and Souths can cherry pick them for their development systems. They already do enough of that from the Eels' development system.
 

Obscene Assassin

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I reckon it wouId be, who is going to identify the juniors and develop them ?

For example the Steelers have named a 40 men matt’s and SG ball squads. Some of these players will be a year young for the age group.

Additionally they also support an Andrew Johns and Laurie Daley cup sides (16’s and 18’s). They use this squads for players missing out of the matt’s / ball squads, as well as a pathway for under age players (eg 16 year olds for Matt’s which is under 17).

So you are probably looking at 60 or so players in the 17’s and another 60 or so in the under 19’s, all getting exposure to NRL supported training / facilities.

BTW - the dragons also have their own Matt’s / Ball side, so the NRL dragons have probably 90-100 kids in each age group.

So if the Dragons weren’t involved in junior development, who wouId look after these kids development ? Who wouId pay for it? Where does the resources and facilities come from? Who identifies the kids?

Yeah the NRL (or more likely the NSWRL and QRL) would have to run these elite competitions, which they already do. And they'd have to pick the players based on their locality, which already happens.

But a draft doesn't stop dumb clubs making dumb decisions. Just because they'd have a higher pick doesn't mean they'd choose the right player or develop them properly once they've gotten over Jersey Flegg age.
 

Poupou Escobar

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I reckon it wouId be, who is going to identify the juniors and develop them ?

For example the Steelers have named a 40 men matt’s and SG ball squads. Some of these players will be a year young for the age group.

Additionally they also support an Andrew Johns and Laurie Daley cup sides (16’s and 18’s). They use this squads for players missing out of the matt’s / ball squads, as well as a pathway for under age players (eg 16 year olds for Matt’s which is under 17).

So you are probably looking at 60 or so players in the 17’s and another 60 or so in the under 19’s, all getting exposure to NRL supported training / facilities.

BTW - the dragons also have their own Matt’s / Ball side, so the NRL dragons have probably 90-100 kids in each age group.

So if the Dragons weren’t involved in junior development, who wouId look after these kids development ? Who wouId pay for it? Where does the resources and facilities come from? Who identifies the kids?
When you talk about junior development do you mean all the players in the local competition or a cherry-picked elite of a few dozen at each age group? Because they are two different things, and some merkins appear to be using them interchangeably.
 

Joshuatheeel

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When you talk about junior development do you mean all the players in the local competition or a cherry-picked elite of a few dozen at each age group? Because they are two different things, and some merkins appear to be using them interchangeably.
I refer to junior development as the elite chosen by the NRL clubs in whatever pathway system/structure they use.
 

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