ROUND 8: NEWTOWN V BRONCOS

Discussion in 'Forum Sevens Matches' started by ozzie, Aug 2, 2003.

  1. ozzie

    ozzie Bench

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    Newtown Vs Bronco's

    Game Thread

    Please note - This is a game thread only, therefore only game posts can be made here (Teams, Articles). Any other posts will result in loss of points.

    **Referee Blows Game On!**

    Full Time: Wednesday 13 August, 2003. 9:00PM AEST

    Referree: Penelope Pittstop
     
  2. broncoman

    broncoman Juniors

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    broncos team

    1 broncoman (c)
    2 BroncoCloete (vc)
    3 Beaver_online
    4 Slats4ever
    5 Raidersman

    Reserves
    6 Wests is best
    7 Mad Tiger
     
  3. Moffo

    Moffo Referee

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    Bags back in black, large and in charge for round 8

    Moffo (c)
    Hass (vc)
    Willow
    Gorilla
    salivor

    Res:
    GBT
    Roopy

    Travelling reserves:
    Legend
    Ozbash
     
  4. Moffo

    Moffo Referee

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    Moffo - posting for the mighty bags

    The problem with footy grounds

    Greetings humanoids, I speak to you from a time far away. A time where the football experience has become a complete one. We all love our footy, that cannot be doubted, but the game is now viewed in luxury and the atmosphere is spot on. Long gone are the days of cheap seats, baseball stadiums, cold meat pies and hot beer

    Ah yes, I am dreaming. We all can dream though, can’t we? One can’t help but lament the fact that in 2003, we are still enduring all the aforementioned failings. When will they get it right?

    Much of my anger and lament stems from a visit to the baseball stadium (I refuse to call it a footy stadium) a few weeks back to see my beloved dogs take on the cowboys. We won, that was good. But the rest of my experience was an eye opener. As for the first time in my rather short existence, I had the pleasure of sitting in a corporate box. All the Crownies you could drink, all the caviar that you could digest and all the benefits that come from mingling with people in positions of power and influence. It was a great way to experience football

    However, I spared a quick 10 minutes to walk around downstairs. I felt out of place, for the first time in perhaps 100 matches that I had been to, I wasn’t out in a plastic seat, putting up with drunks and howling winds. It felt wrong in a way. I have always felt like a diehard fan, I’ve sat in the rain, I’ve watched footy behind barb wire, I’ve watched footy with brawls going on around me, I’ve travelled 100’s of kilometres to see my team play, hell, I even stood in mud once at North Sydney. So what was I doing in a corporate box? Surely they knew as I walked around the ground – you could tell through my eyes that I had sold out. Many a familiar fan can be seen Dogs games, week in and week out. Some are quite affluent; others are camped on struggle street. I had seen many of them before. Some were old, some had probably been there since 1935.

    And I hate the treatment they get

    For a life of support and loyalty, what do they get? A bloody terrible experience in terms of comfort and atmosphere most of the time. This compares to the corporate fan that would rarely go to a game, but gets the best seats in the house with servants waiting to respond to their every whim. Why oh why, in times of such progress and innovation, do we have to be subject to such a miserable experience in order to watch our footy team go around? I can’t speak for all grounds; I have not been to Townsville or Auckland. But what I have seen is spas at grounds in the US, hotels at grounds in Canada and luxurious seating at grounds throughout Europe

    So why should I be subject to a ‘baseball’ experience when I go to watch the dogs play? Why should Cronulla fans be subject to overhanging power lines when the Sharks play? Why should I be subject to howling winds if I wish to watch a game at the Olympic Stadium? There is only one answer. They/I shouldn’t.

    The footy experience is more than the game they are watching. It’s the atmosphere and the comfort. It’s the feeling of enjoyment. And when I walked around the Baseball stadium a couple of weeks back, I saw none of this. Most of these people were watching the game in sufferance; a bad seat, a 90% chance of cold food and a 100% likelihood of it being overpriced. Nothing in it inspires the fan to attend the game. Watch it on channel nine they think, and who would dare blame them?

    So in heading back to the corporate box that had become ours for four hours I thought, why can’t this ‘corporate’ experience be expanded in some form to incorporate all those who attend a game. Make them want to go a game and come out happy. Perhaps it would boost our crowds. Perhaps it would leave clubs with more money so that baseball stadiums can become a thing of the past

    But as I said before, perhaps I am dreaming

    Cheers,
    Moffo
     
  5. broncoman

    broncoman Juniors

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    broncoman (c)
    broncos #1

    Junior Rugby League in the Country

    Most city folk have heard about the “crisis” in country rugby league. But very few have witness the problems first hand. I myself have known of these problems for many years. I played junior footy in Wagga Wagga 8 or 9 years ago and even then I knew there was a problem. The then NSWRL didn’t care about the bush as far as we were concerned. In this article I will attempt to enlighten people in the big city how bad the situation has become here and maybe a few ways it could be fixed.

    As I have already said, I played junior rugby league in Wagga Wagga in the early to mid 1990’s. I have since moved to Canberra and like most people in the big smoke have neglected to think about the game in the country. I am back in Wagga this week and decided to see some local footy on the weekend. I witnessed both some junior and a senior match. The standard of play is as good, if not better than some of the players I’ve seen running around in the Canberra competition. Some of these junior players are very good, quick on their feet. Watching a lot of these kids reminds me of players like Preston Campbell or Matt Bowen.

    Unfortunately many of these players will end up like me, quit at the age of 11. I saw the same problems on the weekend as I did 9 years ago. Parents yelling abuse at officials, players swearing referees as well as at their own team mates and worst of all coaches not setting a good example for the players. Coaches who swear at their own players, abuse them for making a mistake, are just not a good part of the game. The confidence of many children who play under these coaches would be very low for the rest of their time as a junior league player. Everyone suffers as a result of a player will low self-esteem. He will play badly in the game, develop a bad attitude towards the coach and well as the possibility of developing a temper. To me the coach is the middle man in the problem here. He develops the kids, but in too many cases, he does a bad job.

    Thinking back to my junior days and why I quit playing, it’s not hard to work out why the game is struggling. It was on the field during a game I decided that I didn’t want to play anymore. In the under 10’s each player could only have 1 shot at goal in a match, and our five eighth already took one, we had just scored a try and he had the ball and one player in our side wanted to take the shot instead, but the referee said to the other kid “**** off, you just take it.” He did take it, we won the match, the other team protested and we ended up losing the 2 points because of this. It was just no fun anymore.

    Fun was the key word I used there. When you are that young you play for fun. From what I saw on the weekend there are still too many kids not having fun during the game. They look completely disinterested while the coach is talking to them, they don’t seem to want to get involved in the play on the field. It’s about time coaches started to say before each match “Just go out there and have fun” or something positive. Parents too need to play a role, instead of asking a child “Did you score any tries” they should ask “Did you have fun”. It’s all about being positive. The children need to be reminded that it’s not state of origin in the under 10’s, it’s a bunch of friends having a good game of footy on the weekend.

    Something very simple which will help junior footy in the country a lot is Ground maintenance. It isn’t hard for the council to have the grounds mowed every couple of weeks. They are in terrible condition for playing football. They always have been. Ever since I was playing as a kid it’s been like that.

    Overall I think you can see where the problems with country rugby league start. The very bottom. The juniors. We need to concentrate on fixing the game there before we think about anything else.

    word count 744
     
  6. salivor

    salivor First Grade

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    Salivor for the Newtown Bluebags

    ----------------------------------------------------

    Should Lockyer play at five-eighth?

    It’s a question that has sparked debate for many years now but one that came to the fore during this years origin series, should Lockyer play at five-eighth? It’s a question that splits many Rugby League fans and one that must be looked at from both sides. I personally don’t think a move to five-eight for Lockyer is either necessary or has much merit.

    Are there any advantages in Lockyer coming into the halves? Lockyer started out as a five-eight and in a lot of ways this is still very evident in the way he plays as a fullback. Lockyer already acts as a third playmaker for both Brisbane and Queensland spending vast amounts of time at first, second and third receiver. This is what the aguement for Lockyer moving to five-eighth centres around. Why not have him up in the front line permanently solving Brisbane and Queensland’s halves problems and freeing up room for a number of in form specialist fullbacks? Sadly this argument lacks thought.

    Cast your minds back to a bright Sunday afternoon on the 19th of August 2001. The place is Toyota Park where the Brisbane Broncos are playing the Cronulla Sharks in Round 24. Brisbane has lost four matches in a row and Coach Wayne Bennett is in a mood to gamble. He’s placed Darren Lockyer into five-eight. Paul Simpkins blows his whistle and the match is underway. Straight away Lockyer is struggling for breath; he can barely get back his ground on defence and is struggling to tackle. It doesn’t get much better for him in the next forty minutes and when Simpkins signals halftime, a worn out Darren Lockyer heads back to the sheds, when he gets there a wise Wayne Bennett informs him that he’ll be playing at fullback in the second half.

    Come back into the present and you’ll notice that Darren Lockyer has never played at five-eight since that fateful first half at Toyota Park. In the couple of years since that match I’ve always looked back at those forty minutes and been firm in my opinion that Lockyer belongs at fullback. It was then a shock when Wayne Bennett recently revealed that he also looks back to that match when the same old calls for Lockyer to switch positions come up. Its not that Lockyer isn’t capable of playing at five-eight, it’s that he’s not conditioned for the position. That takes time and its time that neither Brisbane nor Queensland has.

    Since the kid from Roma stepped into first grade he has been a star. In 1997 he made his debut for both the Queensland and Australian Super League teams. In 1998 he made his debut for the full Queensland and Australian sides and has been one of the first names picked for both ever since. Hes won Premierships, State of Origin series, Test Series and a World Cup. Hes currently rated by most as the best fullback and the second best player in the game. Not only that, he is rated as not just one of the best fullbacks of our generation but as one of the best fullbacks of all time. If it’s not broken then please don’t fix it.

    With Lockyer at fullback you get the best of both worlds. His one on one defence and positioning at the back is challenged by no one. He is as solid as a rock under the high ball and his kick returns have given coaches many sleepless nights. On the other hand Lockyer will spend most attacking sets up in the front line at first, second and third receiver. He’ll float out wide and a couple of plays later be punching holes down the centre. Then just when you think you’ve seen enough of him he’ll take charge of the tactical kicking game and even kick the occasional goal.

    Lockyer in a way already is playing at five-eight, it’s the way he plays the position of fullback and is the reason he’s one of the first names picked for any representative team. It would be a disaster to wear out a player of Lockyer’s ability in the front line of defence and risk his level of involvement on attack. His best football has all been played at fullback and he is already a star at just 26. We haven’t yet seen the best of Lockyer but when we do mark my words that it will be at fullback.

    ----------------------------------------------------

    745 words including title
    Reference: “Maroons were killed by failure to execute” by Wayne Bennett from The Courier Mail, 29.6.03, http://www.broncos.com.au/default.asp?pg=bennett&spg=default&articleid=19911
     
  7. gorilla

    gorilla Guest

    “Gorilla – strumming my heart with his fingers…”
    For the ‘blues’
    **************************
    The Musician’s Union Top 17 Australian Team

    There’s tribute teams for just about everything – Balmain’s team of the century, Hall of Fame teams, hell - the Immortals in their prime could probably handle most normal teams. I thought that one type of tribute team has been neglected and so we needed to comprise a team of Australian musicians (principally the lead artists and singers because they’re well known.

    Naturally these artists are chosen by a select panel and those selected are chosen because of their persona and represent their artistry whilst they were in their prime (not their current mortal coils).

    Props
    Jimmy Barnes and Tex Perkins – two rough and tough, no-nonsense big guys who will roll up the sleeves and not be afraid of the big hits.

    Hooker
    Angry Anderson – atom ant with attitude, with a close to the ground ruck-clearance pass and hitting power reminiscent of Geoff Toovey. Can fight.

    Second Rowers
    Peter Garrett and Nick Cave – strong, long and lanky with good turns of speed, able to slip the pass away (big hands).

    Lock
    Bon Scott – Mr Jailbreak, tough and fast. Bon only knows to go forward and takes no prisoners. Heart of my team.

    Halfback
    Stevie Wright – “Little Stevie” had the fastest feet and the flashest style in the sixties and seventies. Nimble and elusive but tough as nails. Turned into a good distributor in later years, but developed a tendency to hog.

    Five-eighth
    Glen Wheatley - as a bass player he directed his band around the paddock, as manager he kept the show together and, as entrepreneur, he knew when to pass wide or try the short ball back inside – who else ?

    Centres
    ‘Shirly’ Strauchan and Johnny O’Keefe – Shirl and ‘The Wild One’ both knew when to go for the lead, how to step and take advantage of a good (riff) break. O’Keefe has the advantage of class and Shirl always managed to make the opposition nervous.

    Wingers
    Lionel Rose and John Farnham – Lionel had pace to burn, could strum a guitar and could also fight. Farnham was a quick stepper with an intuitive eye for the two lines, the sideline and the tryline.

    Fullback
    Billy Thorpe – Thorpie directed many a gig from the back and the front, he also spent a long time looking into the sun, something he’ll do lot of with this go-forward team. Good under a high…….ball.

    Bench
    Ricky May – a big man patrolling the rucks.
    Brian Cadd – safe and secure, can play a number of positions.
    Doc Neeson – every team needs a maniac tackler to come on and scale the heights.
    Angus Young – back in black in the second half. Kills them running from dummy half and has a great try celebration.

    Runner
    Russell Crowe – for the fans.

    Coach
    Molly Meldrum – “um, er, do yourselves a favour and get out there and win it!”

    ***********************
    475 words inside the **
     
  8. Anonymous

    Anonymous Juniors

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    St George: 1967 and the different game

    In 1967, Rugby League was a different game.

    Unlimited tackles became a thing of the past with the introduction of the four tackle rule. Originally an English modification, the new rule allowed four attacking plays and at the completion of four tackles, a scrum was packed. The defending team was given the best chance of winning the ball by being allowed the loose head (prop, feed side) and they were also allowed to feed the scrum.

    Following the controversial rule change, coaches and players irreversibly changed their game plans. Kicks became commonplace as attacking teams desperately tried to find touch downfield rather than be trapped with the ball. There were more scrums and with that, scrum penalties became a monotonous blight on the game. The traditional 'softening up period' was gone and replaced with a game where possession changed often.

    Nevertheless, there were supporters of the limited tackle rule who pointed to the new game being faster and often swinging from one end of the field to the other.

    The four tackle rule led to a completely new game of Rugby League and one that was the cause of much debate in its first year. In particular, it has often been blamed for the demise of the St George powerhouse during this period and that the Dragons couldn’t adapt to the new game - a claim which isn’t backed by research and is probably a myth.

    In 1967, the St George Dragons were the defending premiers and had just won a world record 11 premierships in a row. But it was a vastly different world to the one that saw the Dragons beginning their dream run in 1956. Back then, Robert Menzies was Australian Prime Minister and the Melbourne Olympics was delivering stardom to Betty Cuthbert and Dawn Fraser. Ken Rosewall was winning Wimbledon and Rock-and-Roll was shocking parents in America. By 1967, there was Vietnam, protests and the Beatles released Sergeant Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band.

    It was during this that the radical limited tackle rule came into being. This coincided with an end to the Dragons’ reign and gave rise to claims that the new rule was designed to stop St George. While it’s true that their forwards dominated while retaining possession for long periods, the St George of 1967 also adapted to playing under the four tackle rule. They still finished as minor premiers and scored more tries than anyone else. The Dragons had every chance to make it 12 premierships in a row.

    But there were other factors going against them;

    Firstly, core players in the team were one year older and some were having trouble backing up from representative duties. Journalist Mike Gibson wrote, “… a lot of them were looking more than just year older when we saw them rampaging last year.”

    Secondly, the player depth was thinning. Lower grade players, tired of waiting for their chance, found better spots with other clubs. Additionally, there were two new teams in the competition, Penrith Panthers and Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks and this gave more opportunities to players coming onto the open market. In a nutshell, Saints had lost key players, mainly forwards, and left it too late to find replacements. The reality was that they were losing more players than they were gaining.

    Thirdly, Souths were on the rise and their young team of future greats were a year older.

    These factors plus a series of internal disputes were to weigh heavily on Saints in 1967. In particular, Saints were to rue their lost opportunity to keep Kevin Ryan who, as captain-coach of Canterbury-Bankstown would introduce many of the Dragon's training techniques. Ryan's Canterbury would be there in the semi-finals to narrowly defeat St George and finally end their premiership run.

    The four tackle rule, having completed its first season, was still being hotly debated in the boardrooms and public bars of Sydney. A number of players despised the rule. Reg Gasnier didn’t mince words when he simply said, “I hated it.”

    Test hooker, Ian Walsh wrote, “I didn’t like the four tackle rule. Under it, Rugby League became a game of chance and took much of the long-term strategy out of the game.”

    The argument continued until 1971 when the rule was changed again with an extension to six attacking plays. Although the critics continued to debate the issues, it seems that this final six tackle modification silenced the antagonists forever and gave us the game we have today.

    *750 words including title*
    *Ref: Never Before, Never Again by Larry Writer.*
     
  9. Beaver_Online

    Beaver_Online Juniors

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    Beaver_Online, Posting For The Broncos


    Hey John, That Crazy Plan Just Won’t Do



    So mobile phone reseller Crazy John’s wants to buy equity in the Manly Warringah Sea Eagles?

    What a brilliant idea.

    It has been widely reported that the Manly club has been financially struggling since its return to the NRL as a sole entity this year so why shouldn’t the Sea Eagles Football Club and Leagues Club embrace this proposal? It would bring much need funds to the club to ensure its survival and to deliver a team that is competitive…and perhaps return the club to its former hey-day.

    I am fully supportive of this proposal. In fact, I have a few ideas of my own in how to most successfully make this proposal work.

    Firstly, selling the naming rights to Brookvale Oval. We have heard that Crazy John’s Colloseum is the preferred option, but in keeping with the Crazy John’s theme, I think we should be more adventurous. How about Crazy John’s Asylum as an alternative?

    For the first game of 2004, I suggest we secure mecurial 80s pop outfit Madness to belt out Icehouse’s Crazy for the pre-kick off entertainment with Mental As Anything to follow up with post game entertainment and rework Paul Kelly’s Dumb Things.

    Secondly, I think we need to give the Sea Eagles Cheerleaders a complete makeover, and perhaps model the troupe on One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nests Nurse Ratchet, a bunch of nasty, ugly mothers that only a mother could love. We will deck them out in white nurses uniforms and white sand shoes and they can wave hands full of syringes in place of the traditional pom-pom.

    The players will run out on the field, or be chased onto the field by a bunch of burly security wardens. We should ditch the traditional Maroon and White and deck the players out in straightjackets with Crazy John’s logos emblazoned across the chest. All players will also be required to have their hair pulled out in chunks, a few teeth beaten out of their mouths and coke-bottle glasses issued as standard.

    We will also be getting rid of the Eagles Angels lounge and creating The Padded Cell, which is wall to wall white padding with one tiny window overlooking the playing field.

    Depending on how the boys are playing at half time, the half time break will consist of electro-shocks (if we are losing) or an abundance of medication (if we are winning). The half time entertainment will consist of dribbling and psycho-babble competitions, followed by best impersonations of a manic-depressive or someone with dementia.

    The dressing rooms will become The Quiet Room and the scoreboard will become a giant test pattern to entertain the crazy supporters on The Hill.

    The Hill will no longer serve beers, chips and meat pies but rather offer juices, uppers, and group counseling sessions and craft workshops.

    Sounds like a plan huh?

    The plan to sell the Manly Sea Eagles in whole or in part to Crazy John’s is truly one of rugby leagues great disgraces, however, as a beloved supporter, it may be our only option to survive.

    But it comes with great peril. Already Melbourne, Brisbane, North Queensland and the NZ Warriors are owned in whole or in part by private entities. Our game is close to being fully Americanised.

    The sale of the Sea Eagles will be one step further to the offloading of other struggling teams to private interests (Wests Tigers and Souths especially), heralding the birth of the sporting franchise.

    Our game will become like the American NFL franchise system that sees teams dumped in a city, then uprooted and dumped elsewhere at the discretion of the owner in a bid to suit a market.

    The Manly Warringah Sea Eagles will be the first of the privately owned rugby league clubs to be uprooted and relocated to another city. The Sea Eagle has synergy with the coast, the beach and the water…and if the sale of the Sea Eagles goes ahead - I am sad to say – the Sea Eagle will be heading to the coast…one that is bathed in Gold.

    Nurse please pass the morphine and make this pain go away…


    Words: About 700
     
  10. ozzie

    ozzie Bench

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    GAME OVER - TIME GIRLS AND BOYS

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Penelope Pittstop

    Penelope Pittstop Bench

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    Moffo, Fantastic topic and it would be great to see an improvement of facilities and a decrease in prices at grounds. Going corporate has it's advantages !! 8.3

    Broncoman, as a footy Mum on the Gold Coast in the 90's I was embarrassed on many occassions by the parents of players and amazed at how some kids were pretty much forced to play. Your article also bought back some fond memories as well. Top Stuff. 8.1

    Profession article Salivor, I always enjoy reading about one of the nice men of league. 8.6

    Gorilla, I think you may be showing your age and I wonder if some of the younger crew will struggle to recognise some of the artists you name. Luckily I'm an old chook and found your comparisions spot on. 8.9 Ricky May LOL.

    Willow, a look at an era, and the changes within the game. Interesting to hear how changes may affect a team. 9.2

    Am always impressed with a wicked sense of humour Beaver. Totally understand your concern and you make valid points. 8.7


    Bluebags 35

    Moffo 8.3

    Salivor 8.6

    Gorilla 8.9

    Willow 9.2



    Bronco's 16.8

    Broncoman 8.1

    Beaver On-Line 8.7

    Bluebags defeat Bronco's 35 - 16.8
     
  12. Anonymous

    Anonymous Juniors

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    Thank you Broncos, Thank you ref.
    Plus thank you to Gorilla and the Musicians Union. :lol:
     
  13. salivor

    salivor First Grade

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    Where was Hass? I know he loves his whole Brett Kenny last man thing but whos he imitating with the no show?
     
  14. gorilla

    gorilla Guest

    Heyah Willow - missed you at the last debacle - my bro-in-law puled family birthday rank and I couldn't make it.
    desperate to see us at KoJo 'gainst the Knights for a big win after the thrash of the Sharks. :twisted:
    I imagine you'd know some of those names in the muso's Union 17.
    Thought of a place for Rob Hirst (didn't have a drummer).
    Thanks, Ms Pittstop and ballgirls.
    I knew you were a chicken but I wasn't sure if you were a pullet or a chook ?
    I loved Little Stevie and Bon Scott - AC/DC were never the same after he left us.
    I'm learning the geetar right now after a 30 yr absence and Friday on my Mind is a current fav - I suppose I should put my $ were my :-O is and learn an unplugged version of Jailbreak.
    Maggie
     

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