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Rumours and Stuff

Messages
10,400
I'd still back Pou. He was in the Army. Actually I'd back him with one hand tied behind his back
star wars fighting GIF by Internet Cat Video Festival
 

84 Baby

Referee
Messages
28,801
I just don't think you guys have thought this through.

What does player option mean in the NBA and how can it be used by teams and players during the free agency?​


NBA free agency is just around the corner, which means that player options are being picked up and declined across the league. Milwaukee Bucks champion Bryn Forbes is the latest player to decline his option and therefore will be seeking a new home when the window opens for negotiations to begin on Monday

In this article, we will examine why player options can be beneficial to both teams and players and what exactly they are in the context of free agency.

With player power growing ever stronger in the NBA, 'player options' are one of the most obvious examples of star's empowerment to decide their own future.

With this option, a player can decide whether to stay another year with their team or become an unrestricted free agent. For example, if a player has a contract that runs for three years but has an option in the fourth, exercising it would extend the contract through the fourth year while declining it would automatically put them into free agency, open to join another team.

The player option is non-negotiable and therefore cannot be revoked if it is already exercised. They also do not depend on how the player performs during a season or how many appearances they make and cannot have a lower salary.

There are a lot of benefits to players opting out of their deal. Most importantly, it gives them financial flexibility, allowing them to weigh up all impending offers. It also forces the hand of their former team to resign them if they have proved they are worth of a bigger pay-day.

However, it can come at a risk. Sticking or twisting is a challenging scenario for any player. Take Bryn Forbes and Bobby Portis for example. Forbes has, on Tuesday, opted out of his contract and will test free agency, while Portis could test free agency too if he wants a pay rise. In doing so, both could be risking the fact that the Bucks may choose not to re-sign them. Being in a winning franchise can be more important to players than a slightly larger pay cheque with no hopes of competing for a ring.

This is where teams' power comes into the equation. Bigger markets know that players will want to exercise their option if there is a chance of a title. It allows them to avoid paying larger salaries to players they know should be earning more. Alternatively, organizations can use their powers of persuasion if they believe a player is ready to decline his option by stating how big a contract they could offer.

In the 2021 NBA free agency market, the biggest names that could decline their player option are Chris Paul, Kawhi Leonard, Montrezi Harrell, Serge Ibaka and Josh Richardson. It remains to be seen how many of them will enter free agency, and how many re-sign

Mate… I think you played right into the apples/oranges debate…
The NBA salary cap is one of the tightest and transparent EBA documents there is. Honestly it’s the benchmark for all sports IMO and would be up there in terms of all employment EBAs worldwide. The NRL contract environment is nothing like the NBA.

Player options can be useful and I agree with Pou they have been our risk approach of trying to get competitive edge. But they haven’t fully worked (if we won 2022, no one would really give much of a shit now) and now we’re paying for it, which leads to the real problem, lack of contingency or mitigation. The more risk you take, the more prepared you need to be for it to fail, but just like the team on the field, we’ve got no plan B.
 

oldmancraigy

Coach
Messages
11,669
I just don't think you guys have thought this through.

What does player option mean in the NBA and how can it be used by teams and players during the free agency?​


NBA free agency is just around the corner, which means that player options are being picked up and declined across the league. Milwaukee Bucks champion Bryn Forbes is the latest player to decline his option and therefore will be seeking a new home when the window opens for negotiations to begin on Monday

In this article, we will examine why player options can be beneficial to both teams and players and what exactly they are in the context of free agency.

With player power growing ever stronger in the NBA, 'player options' are one of the most obvious examples of star's empowerment to decide their own future.

With this option, a player can decide whether to stay another year with their team or become an unrestricted free agent. For example, if a player has a contract that runs for three years but has an option in the fourth, exercising it would extend the contract through the fourth year while declining it would automatically put them into free agency, open to join another team.

The player option is non-negotiable and therefore cannot be revoked if it is already exercised. They also do not depend on how the player performs during a season or how many appearances they make and cannot have a lower salary.

There are a lot of benefits to players opting out of their deal. Most importantly, it gives them financial flexibility, allowing them to weigh up all impending offers. It also forces the hand of their former team to resign them if they have proved they are worth of a bigger pay-day.

However, it can come at a risk. Sticking or twisting is a challenging scenario for any player. Take Bryn Forbes and Bobby Portis for example. Forbes has, on Tuesday, opted out of his contract and will test free agency, while Portis could test free agency too if he wants a pay rise. In doing so, both could be risking the fact that the Bucks may choose not to re-sign them. Being in a winning franchise can be more important to players than a slightly larger pay cheque with no hopes of competing for a ring.

This is where teams' power comes into the equation. Bigger markets know that players will want to exercise their option if there is a chance of a title. It allows them to avoid paying larger salaries to players they know should be earning more. Alternatively, organizations can use their powers of persuasion if they believe a player is ready to decline his option by stating how big a contract they could offer.

In the 2021 NBA free agency market, the biggest names that could decline their player option are Chris Paul, Kawhi Leonard, Montrezi Harrell, Serge Ibaka and Josh Richardson. It remains to be seen how many of them will enter free agency, and how many re-sign


To be fair, that is a soft-cap scenario, and some of the more revered GMs avoid POs like the plague, unless it is for a max player. In that case they aren't getting a cheaper deal, they are simply giving the player more power to leave if they don't like where the club is heading.

NBA POs are very favourable to the players in almost every case

Also I think that article is dated and refers to the previous CBA. It has changed slightly since then (although the general PO stuff remains the same-ish)
 

Poupou Escobar

Post Whore
Messages
87,607
Even a new coach will need time and patience to restore the club
Like the patience required after 2018? And that was without sacking the coach. Deadset this is the first time in six years we've lost more than half our games and merkins are running around like the sky is falling.
 

Poupou Escobar

Post Whore
Messages
87,607
And yet the sum total of any reasonable interpretation of your posts leads to this exact post.

As for Pou, you don't even need interpretation, this is literally what the dickhead says ad nauseam - except he also says that this all we have the right to expect!
Don't misinterpret me mate. This dickhead says we shouldn't expect to never miss the top eight, even in consecutive years. The average number of wins in a 24 game season is 12. The average for the Storm over the past 17 seasons (an arbitrary number chosen for the number of clubs currently in the comp) is 17 per year. How many wins should we expect per year, on average? What are we entitled to?
 

Poupou Escobar

Post Whore
Messages
87,607
Mate… I think you played right into the apples/oranges debate…
The NBA salary cap is one of the tightest and transparent EBA documents there is. Honestly it’s the benchmark for all sports IMO and would be up there in terms of all employment EBAs worldwide. The NRL contract environment is nothing like the NBA.

Player options can be useful and I agree with Pou they have been our risk approach of trying to get competitive edge. But they haven’t fully worked (if we won 2022, no one would really give much of a shit now) and now we’re paying for it, which leads to the real problem, lack of contingency or mitigation. The more risk you take, the more prepared you need to be for it to fail, but just like the team on the field, we’ve got no plan B.
I think the plan B is doing like any team and waiting out your low points. There isn't a quick solution to any problem.
 

hindy111

Post Whore
Messages
60,986
I don't mind missing the top 8. Aslong as it's the end of cycle and can see a rebuild ready and developing.
My worry is I don't know if we've even hit rock bottom yet and still have 5 guys contracted for 2yrs who look passed it.
Hey who knows. 3 or 4 juniors may pop up and change our fortunes. Blayze,MA,Guymer and who knows. It's not impossible for this to happen.
 

Gronk

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
75,459
Mate… I think you played right into the apples/oranges debate…
The NBA salary cap is one of the tightest and transparent EBA documents there is. Honestly it’s the benchmark for all sports IMO and would be up there in terms of all employment EBAs worldwide. The NRL contract environment is nothing like the NBA.

Player options can be useful and I agree with Pou they have been our risk approach of trying to get competitive edge. But they haven’t fully worked (if we won 2022, no one would really give much of a shit now) and now we’re paying for it, which leads to the real problem, lack of contingency or mitigation. The more risk you take, the more prepared you need to be for it to fail, but just like the team on the field, we’ve got no plan B.
How are we paying for it exactly ?

We have POs to Blaize (expired), Brown, Moses, Matto* and Penisni.

I hope they all want to stay. If they don't then they will make it clear well prior to November the year before their exercise window opens/closes the year after, as their manager will be out there looking for deals. There are no secrets in the NRL.

If these players did not have options, then we would still be making offers trying to keep them before November.

The only risk that a club runs is that a player turns to shit and you don't want him. That's why you don't offer a PO to Lumelume and do offer an option to Blaize.

* Sorry haters. He played well on Saturday.
 
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