What's new
The Front Row Forums

Register a free account today to become a member of the world's largest Rugby League discussion forum! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

The future of woman's RL

ALX25

Juniors
Messages
1,526
Some of Queensland’s best players will begin their preparations for a busy women’s rugby league season next year when they assemble for the first of a series of specialised Harvey Norman Queensland Maroons Origin camps this week.

An extended squad of 34 players will come together this Saturday, December 11, on the Gold Coast to begin working towards an action-packed 2022 calendar that includes two NRLW seasons, a QRL statewide competition season, the Ampol State of Origin match, an NRL All Stars match and the Rugby League World Cup at the end of the year.

Read more: https://www.qrl.com.au/news/2021/12...an-queensland-maroons-origin-squad-announced/
 

ALX25

Juniors
Messages
1,526
Some of Queensland’s best players will begin their preparations for a busy women’s rugby league season next year when they assemble for the first of a series of specialised Harvey Norman Queensland Maroons Origin camps this week.

An extended squad of 34 players will come together this Saturday, December 11, on the Gold Coast to begin working towards an action-packed 2022 calendar that includes two NRLW seasons, a QRL statewide competition season, the Ampol State of Origin match, an NRL All Stars match and the Rugby League World Cup at the end of the year.

Read more: https://www.qrl.com.au/news/2021/12...an-queensland-maroons-origin-squad-announced/

In pictures: Extended Harvey Norman Queensland Maroons squad camp
See: https://www.qrl.com.au/news/2021/12...-harvey-norman-queensland-maroons-squad-camp/
 

ALX25

Juniors
Messages
1,526
The North Queensland Toyota Gold Stars have announced their 2022 satellite squads ahead of March’s QRLW season kickoff.

Consisting of 70 of the brightest female talent in North Queensland, the three bases (Cairns, Townsville and Mackay) are made up of returning Gold Stars, Harvey Norman Under 19s players and development prospects.

See: https://www.cowboys.com.au/news/2021/12/13/gold-stars-2022-satellite-squads-announced/
 

10$ Ferret

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
829
The NSW Tarsha Gale competition started on the weekend. From the couple of trials I have seen and the one game I watched yesterday, its safe to say the competition has ramped up another level once again. The female game is going stong especially with the top few teams.
I was impressed with Parra on the weekend they seem to have worked hard and could possibly scare a few teams along the way. The Roosters got the win but it was not easy for them and have a few cobwebs to dust off
 

Centy Coast

Juniors
Messages
55
IF you are interested get down to see some Tarsha Gale. In past years I may not have said this but its different.
Its gone from quarters to halves, from 9 a side to 11 a side to 13 a side.
Is gone from have 1 or 2 fast players and getting them to run around everyone to structured rL.

Today I saw a Roosters side demolish a Bulldogs team. Now this is not a terrible girls RL they have some good players including one that ripped the best teams apart at the edges last year.
But the Roosters could defend, they made a couple of errors but backed it up. They scored points by playing RL not just a more physical game of oztag.

The point is not the score, the doggies will come back, but it was good RL and thats a great sign
The Roosters doing what they do best, they recruited three of the Bulldogs best players during the off season and grabbed Hopoates daughter from North Sydney.
MAY as well hand them the trophy now.
 

10$ Ferret

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
829
The Roosters doing what they do best, they recruited three of the Bulldogs best players during the off season and grabbed Hopoates daughter from North Sydney.
MAY as well hand them the trophy now.

The 3 dogs players approached the Roosters they were sick of losing and not getting any better as players.
Unfortunately for he dogs if they had stayed I think they might see things look a bit different as they are a much better side than previous couple of years.
The Roosters also have the NSW U19 coach which is always an attractive thing for players.
I do not know how Hopoate come except that there is a strong Manly connection already at the Roosters, which makes me wonder why Manly are so anti female RL.
Also there is an arrangement with Norths in terms of player movement.

They haven't played any of the top teams yet, see what happens when they play Illawarra or St George
 

10$ Ferret

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
829
Still look second rate against the mighty Bronx.
The Broncos certainly managed the game well, they dictated the speed and basically everything about the game. But that happens when you are not bound by the rules like the other clubs are. This is regarding when they can start training and how much they can train. This is simply why Brisbane have won 3 comps. They start training months before the other teams.
The Roosters showed commitment but not organisation.
 
Messages
13,713
What? The Broncos have won three titles because other teams have rules in place that they aren't allowed to train that often? First of all, why? Secondly, how is that the Broncos fault?
 

Nuke

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
4,476
The way I understand it is that all NRLW teams have a date to which they are not supposed to be training before. Maybe it's for insurance purposes, I don't know.

But because most (all?) of the Broncos NRLW players live relatively close by, they unofficially start training months earlier, thus giving them a big head-start each season.
 

10$ Ferret

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
829
There are also times of the day that training for the NRLW is officially to occur, the purpose is to allow the players to continue to work and also sort out family commitments.

These are NOT club rules but NRLW rules which the team has been opening flaunting. I guess good luck to them as if you are going to get away with it, why not do it, its certainly helped them.
 

Vee

Bench
Messages
4,360

‘Why didn’t we do this 30 years ago?’ Quayle’s regret over women’s game​

Andrew Webster

Andrew Webster

Chief Sports Writer
March 4, 2022 — 4.00am

John Quayle eased back into his lounge chair on Sunday, remote in one hand, a glass of chardonnay possibly in the other, and settled in for an afternoon of rugby league.

In another life, as boss of the NSWRL and then ARL, he would’ve scoffed at the notion of women playing the game, let alone sitting down to watch three consecutive matches in one afternoon, all of it live on Channel Nine and Fox Sports.

Yet here he was, watching Titans lock Destiny Brill snap up the ball at dummy half, charge at the line, attract four St George Illawarra defenders, wrestle her arms free before getting an offload to Shannon Moto, who dived over for the try.

“I thought of Beetson,” Quayle said, referring to the Eastern Suburbs legend Arthur Beetson, who was one of Quayle’s great mates before his death in 2011.

Quayle then revealed a deep regret: “Why didn’t we do this 30 years ago?”
He didn’t do it because the medical advice from the doctors of the day was clear: women shouldn’t tackle each other.

“It was the late 80s, early 90s,” Quayle explained. “The medical advice was we were not ready for women to play a physical contact sport like this. There were concerns that the game could be sued, all that sort of stuff. They could play Mini or Mod league, but girls had to stop playing at 12 years of age. When I flicked it on [last Sunday] to see how it was presented, at the ground and on TV, it was just incredible. But the thing that impressed me most was the skill. There was no wrestle … As a former administrator, I couldn’t help but think, ‘Why didn’t we do this 30 years ago?’”

The NRLW is underway, eliciting the usual spectrum of emotions whenever women play traditional male sports, especially the football codes. Debates about equal pay, or just more pay, dominate discussion. The outright hostility demonstrated by one side, and the lack of perspective on the other, helps nobody.

They are also moot points in many respects because the last time I looked nobody was standing in my lounge-room, pointing a shotgun at me, insisting I watch women’s rugby league. Is someone in yours? Call the police.
The opening round of the NRLW was a mixed bag: incredible skill, brutal physicality, exciting tries scored, thrilling climaxes, and often slow and sloppy play. I drifted in and out of watching, sometimes entertained, sometimes not, much like I do with some NRL matches.

But whether you or I enjoy the NRLW is irrelevant. Our perceptions doesn’t make it less valid to those who do and, especially, to those who play it. The NRL is investing in the competition because it has no choice: the gates have flown back in women’s sport with rugby league competing with the AFL, rugby union, football and cricket in the race for the hearts and minds of the kiddies and the credit card details of the mums and dads who buy tickets and merchandise.

Plenty of people, mostly men, blather about the women’s game being a waste of money but the $5 million the NRL spends annually on the elite competition is a drop in the ocean for a code that’s secured $2 billion in broadcast funding over the next five years.

Rugby Australia didn’t quite cash in on the women’s sevens team winning gold at the 2016 Rio Olympics, but the AFLW has quickly established national dominance like its male equivalent. The NRL is conscious of this and doesn’t want to be left behind, although it’s taken a prudent, cautious approach to building its competition.

There have been distinct gains since the NRLW’s first season in 2017. It is the game’s fast-growing demographic with participation at all levels growing from 10,000 players to 35,000. There are presently 1500 female coaches and 500 referees.

Meanwhile, on TV, the audience is also growing. The women’s annual State of Origin attracts nearly one million viewers. On Sunday, about 204,000 watched Parramatta’s thrilling victory over Newcastle when Maddie Studdon kicked the winning field goal – up nine per cent on 2020 (the NRLW competition was cancelled last year).

Which brings us to Abbi Church, 23, who came on late in the match for the Eels and represents the type of commitment young women are making to play the sport at an elite level. She grew up in Werombi, near Camden, supported South Sydney like her dad but longed to play the game. She played touch and OzTag until Group 6 introduced a women’s comp three years ago.

Around the same time, she became a paramedic and over the past two years has been on the frontline in Sydney’s west as COVID-19 ripped through the suburbs. She squeezed in training between exhausting 16-hour shifts.
After the Eels included her in their squad this season, Church decided to work part-time.

“I’ve had to sacrifice a few things to make it work – but I couldn’t pass up this opportunity,” she said. “I was working four 12-hour shifts a week but recently dropped to part-time – just two shifts – because with my job I can’t just finish and then run to training. I’ve had to sacrifice that but a lot of women in the game have. They come to training from work, or finish training, get a quick sleep then work a night shift.”

Church laughs when I tell her about the medical advice offered to Quayle 30 years ago. “We’re not biologically the same as men, nobody is saying that,” she said. “But the way the game’s evolved, there’s no reason why we shouldn’t be out there, running around, hitting each other.”

Nick Politis is the most passionate Roosters man that ever lived and there the chairman was in Newcastle on Sunday, showing up in the dressing room after the club’s NRLW team had suffered a heavy defeat to the Broncos.
“All the players’ eyes lit up,” said one official. “They felt like they were part of the club.”
Women have supported and followed rugby league for decades, although the behaviour of some male players in recent years has turned many away from the game.

The advancement of the women’s game can only help heal some of those wounds. Is that a bad thing?
As John Quayle suggests, perhaps rugby league should have done it sooner.
 

10$ Ferret

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
829
An interesting read.
the other interesting thing is the disparity between different districts views on women's RL.
There are still some that are not really interested which is sad.

But also lets not get caught up and think the NRLW is what its all about. That's simply one part and I think not the most important part
 

Nuke

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
4,476
Those districts that are lagging behind or showing disinterest, they'll come on board when everyone else has streaked ahead.

The various Leagues just need to put the foot down and really encourage all their clubs to push for womens teams. I can only speak from a WA point of view, but the NRLWA do this, and our womens comp is getting stronger every year. Starting last year, NITV showed nationally one game a week from the NRLWA Womens Premiership.

As a former club president, I know that you can push and push for a team (regardless of the grade or the gender), but you can't force a team if there aren't enough interested players. But, if you persist, you'll get there.
 

10$ Ferret

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
829
You are right Nuke. I have run clubs and I agree with you.
The unfortunate thing as I understand it Penrith and Manly are just not interested. Although in Penriths case there are people that want it to happen but they don't have the pull yet. Maybe the reinstatement of their TG cup side was a good sign.
The funny thing is if Manly put together a local HNWP team and a TG cup team they could go close to winning both comps
 

Nuke

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
4,476
That's what I'm talking about. If they're uninterested, then the next level up who they answer to should be telling them to pull their finger out.

They just need to look around them and see what's happening. Surely they don't to be left out?
 

TheRam

Coach
Messages
11,648

‘Why didn’t we do this 30 years ago?’ Quayle’s regret over women’s game​

Andrew Webster

Andrew Webster

Chief Sports Writer
March 4, 2022 — 4.00am

John Quayle eased back into his lounge chair on Sunday, remote in one hand, a glass of chardonnay possibly in the other, and settled in for an afternoon of rugby league.

In another life, as boss of the NSWRL and then ARL, he would’ve scoffed at the notion of women playing the game, let alone sitting down to watch three consecutive matches in one afternoon, all of it live on Channel Nine and Fox Sports.

Yet here he was, watching Titans lock Destiny Brill snap up the ball at dummy half, charge at the line, attract four St George Illawarra defenders, wrestle her arms free before getting an offload to Shannon Moto, who dived over for the try.

“I thought of Beetson,” Quayle said, referring to the Eastern Suburbs legend Arthur Beetson, who was one of Quayle’s great mates before his death in 2011.

Quayle then revealed a deep regret: “Why didn’t we do this 30 years ago?”
He didn’t do it because the medical advice from the doctors of the day was clear: women shouldn’t tackle each other.

“It was the late 80s, early 90s,” Quayle explained. “The medical advice was we were not ready for women to play a physical contact sport like this. There were concerns that the game could be sued, all that sort of stuff. They could play Mini or Mod league, but girls had to stop playing at 12 years of age. When I flicked it on [last Sunday] to see how it was presented, at the ground and on TV, it was just incredible. But the thing that impressed me most was the skill. There was no wrestle … As a former administrator, I couldn’t help but think, ‘Why didn’t we do this 30 years ago?’”

The NRLW is underway, eliciting the usual spectrum of emotions whenever women play traditional male sports, especially the football codes. Debates about equal pay, or just more pay, dominate discussion. The outright hostility demonstrated by one side, and the lack of perspective on the other, helps nobody.

They are also moot points in many respects because the last time I looked nobody was standing in my lounge-room, pointing a shotgun at me, insisting I watch women’s rugby league. Is someone in yours? Call the police.
The opening round of the NRLW was a mixed bag: incredible skill, brutal physicality, exciting tries scored, thrilling climaxes, and often slow and sloppy play. I drifted in and out of watching, sometimes entertained, sometimes not, much like I do with some NRL matches.

But whether you or I enjoy the NRLW is irrelevant. Our perceptions doesn’t make it less valid to those who do and, especially, to those who play it. The NRL is investing in the competition because it has no choice: the gates have flown back in women’s sport with rugby league competing with the AFL, rugby union, football and cricket in the race for the hearts and minds of the kiddies and the credit card details of the mums and dads who buy tickets and merchandise.

Plenty of people, mostly men, blather about the women’s game being a waste of money but the $5 million the NRL spends annually on the elite competition is a drop in the ocean for a code that’s secured $2 billion in broadcast funding over the next five years.

Rugby Australia didn’t quite cash in on the women’s sevens team winning gold at the 2016 Rio Olympics, but the AFLW has quickly established national dominance like its male equivalent. The NRL is conscious of this and doesn’t want to be left behind, although it’s taken a prudent, cautious approach to building its competition.

There have been distinct gains since the NRLW’s first season in 2017. It is the game’s fast-growing demographic with participation at all levels growing from 10,000 players to 35,000. There are presently 1500 female coaches and 500 referees.

Meanwhile, on TV, the audience is also growing. The women’s annual State of Origin attracts nearly one million viewers. On Sunday, about 204,000 watched Parramatta’s thrilling victory over Newcastle when Maddie Studdon kicked the winning field goal – up nine per cent on 2020 (the NRLW competition was cancelled last year).

Which brings us to Abbi Church, 23, who came on late in the match for the Eels and represents the type of commitment young women are making to play the sport at an elite level. She grew up in Werombi, near Camden, supported South Sydney like her dad but longed to play the game. She played touch and OzTag until Group 6 introduced a women’s comp three years ago.

Around the same time, she became a paramedic and over the past two years has been on the frontline in Sydney’s west as COVID-19 ripped through the suburbs. She squeezed in training between exhausting 16-hour shifts.
After the Eels included her in their squad this season, Church decided to work part-time.

“I’ve had to sacrifice a few things to make it work – but I couldn’t pass up this opportunity,” she said. “I was working four 12-hour shifts a week but recently dropped to part-time – just two shifts – because with my job I can’t just finish and then run to training. I’ve had to sacrifice that but a lot of women in the game have. They come to training from work, or finish training, get a quick sleep then work a night shift.”

Church laughs when I tell her about the medical advice offered to Quayle 30 years ago. “We’re not biologically the same as men, nobody is saying that,” she said. “But the way the game’s evolved, there’s no reason why we shouldn’t be out there, running around, hitting each other.”

Nick Politis is the most passionate Roosters man that ever lived and there the chairman was in Newcastle on Sunday, showing up in the dressing room after the club’s NRLW team had suffered a heavy defeat to the Broncos.
“All the players’ eyes lit up,” said one official. “They felt like they were part of the club.”
Women have supported and followed rugby league for decades, although the behaviour of some male players in recent years has turned many away from the game.

The advancement of the women’s game can only help heal some of those wounds. Is that a bad thing?
As John Quayle suggests, perhaps rugby league should have done it sooner.

As always, RL is always late to the party and misses most opportunities to get a head start. Even this go slowly, slowly tactic is a mistake. I get that they want quality over quantity, but it hasn't hurt the AFL. In fact I heard the AFL is now a much better spectacle then when it first started. So ours will be too. They better add another 4 teams next year and make it a decent comp or we are giving way to much ground to that other code again.

If we all listened to doctors or solicitors about these types of things sport would essentially not exist.
 
Last edited:
Top