2012 Round Four :: Warriors v Bluebags

Discussion in 'Forum Sevens Matches' started by joshie, Jul 21, 2012.

  1. joshie

    joshie Live Update Team

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    [​IMG] -V- [​IMG]

    Match Preview: The Warriors are hosting the once force in the Bluebags. Both clubs are in a steady decline and both need to shake up their stocks with a big performance. The Warriors have a new captain after former captain Robster ditched his team to mine in WA, while the Bluebags need to get numbers in to make a charge for the finals.

    Game Thread:
    * This is a game thread only. Only game posts can be made here - team lists, substitutions, and articles.
    * Any other posts may result in loss of points and is at the discretion of the referee.
    * Only original articles, not used in previous games, will be marked by referees.

    Naming Teams:
    * 5 -V- 5 (+ 3 reserves for home sides; + 2 for away)
    * No 'TBA' or changing players named
    * Captains must stick with original teams named

    Rules: http://f7s.leagueunlimited.com/rules.php
    Official Word Counter: http://f7s.leagueunlimited.com/wordcount.php

    Kick Off: Monday 19th July 2012 (6:00pm AEDT)
    Full Time: Sunday 29th July 2012 (Fulltime is at midnight)
    Referee: madunit
    Venue: Mt Smart Stadium
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  2. Russell Crowe's Band

    Russell Crowe's Band Referee

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    Warriors lineup

    Russell Crowe's Band
    Fin Vizz
    Robster
    Half
    Warrior Defence
     
  3. Vin Fizz

    Vin Fizz Bench

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    Vin Fizz for the Warriors on Debut. I hope I dont let the side down.
    750 words in total.

    The Oldest “WON” in the Book:
    So this horse walks into the bar and the bar tender says “ Why the long face?”
    What a classic. The joke has lost its meaning overtime having been transformed into the language of the common man and dragged out as required. It’s the oldest joke in the book surely. Or is it? One thing’s for sure, when you’re a Sharkies fan there is another, that curiously commences with the laugh followed by the punch line rather than the reverse. “Hahaha, 40 odd years and you’ve won stuff all? “. “Great… got any new material?” is the standard response followed by a few muttered words and short period of silence until someone changes the subject.
    Well I’ve made a decision. Unlike Mal, who refuses to become a student of the game I’d like too. So hell bent on that pursuit I’ve decided to think more deeply about the game and being a long time member of the BWB I found myself pondering that ubiquitous comment. 40 odd years hey.. and won stuff all? It doesn’t ring true to me. I mean won stuff all, nothing, nada, bubkiss? Is it true that the only measure of success is a top grade premiership? It’s like nothing else matters. Over a century of rugby league in this nation is boiled down to about 100 or so results? Less when you think that the early premierships were decided as first past the post. Later on the premierships could be decided in the semi final providing the minor premier won their semi final. If that didn’t occur the minor premiers had one last shot despite the loss and would progress automatically to play the winner of the next weekends final a week after, in a Grand Final. That borders on insulting to those that have played, watched, participated or officiated the game at any level over the years. There must be greater measure of success surely. So I take another gulp of my beer, smile at the horse standing at the bar and compile a short dossier of the Sharks achievements to provide a broader perspective.
    Having entered the Sydney competition in 1967 Cronulla played its first Grand Final a mere 7 years later in 1973, which is considered the most brutal of all time. In the 1978 Grand Final they forced a replay, which was once again an unusual event. In the 1997 Superleague season they participated in the only Superleague Grand Final ever. Ok, nice things to recall but in reality provided scant comfort. I thought harder.
    The Sharks have been Club Champions, which is a reflection of the club as a whole. They’ve won reserve grade, under 21 premierships, in the same year at times. We have won the minor premiership in first grade as well, and of course are the ultimate bearers of the AMCO Cup of 1979. That’s sounding more like it but again, it appears that the measure of success in the greatest game of all is the silverware you display. There must be other things. Maybe another beer, but not too many or the horse will start looking good.
    What about the players. Well the Prince of Centres Steve Rogers played in our colours. The Australian Captain Greg Pearce was a Shark. Some of the games greats played in the BWB, and not just for Australia. New Zealand and England representatives have played for the Sharks. The iron man of league and current Blues Captain, Kangaroo vice-Captain and International Player of the Year has elected to play for the Sharks along with the current Blues five eight. This club that is apparently so starved of success has contributed to city, country, state and international sides for many years. Not to mention providing an avenue for junior rugby league players in the region to progress to the elite level. Wow when you put that all together these aren’t the characteristics of a club that has won stuff all.
    When I look back at our journey so far, that old joke doesn’t carry the same venom anymore. Success means so much more to me as a sharks fan and that’s what binds us like no other club. That and the opportunity few followers have, to be there when they win their first!!
    You know ... everyone is right; we haven’t won an NRL premiership… yet. But I tell you … that’s the only thing we haven’t done!
    That sad horse mustn’t follow the sharks!
     
  4. Drew-Sta

    Drew-Sta Moderator Staff Member

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    Naming the squad, but we have injury issues and I'm not sure the whole team will take the field.

    1. Drew-Sta (c)
    2. Timmah (vc)
    3. muzby
    4. Rexxy
    5. Cliffhanger

    6. AlwaysGreen
    7. Goddo
     
  5. WarriorDefence

    WarriorDefence Juniors

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    Manlys top 10 kiwis

    With tonight's rematch of last years final between NZ and Manly I thought it was a good time to look back on the relationship between kiwi players and the Manly club.
    Before the advent of the Auckland warriors NZ had an unofficial team- the Maori Warringah sea eagles. A lot of kiwis began following the sea eagles when Darly Williams became the first kiwi player to win the then NSWRL grand final. Plenty more jumped on board in the early 90s when Graham Lowe took up the head coaching job bringing several of his country men such as the Iro brothers and later Matthew Ridge with him. However Manly already had a history of kiwi players dating back to John "jock" Butterfeild, one of new Zealand's greatest ever players and the trend continues today with mainstays Keiren Foran, Steve Matai and Joe Galavao.
    Here is a list of 10 of the best.
    10) John "jock" Butterfeild was the pioneer, prior to Gary Freeman he had played more tests than any other New Zealander. He played 10 games for Manly in 1964 and paved the way for future kiwis to test themselves in the worlds best competition.
    9) Kevin Iro followed his brother Tony to Manly to join with his Wigan and kiwi mentor Graham Lowe. The original beast chalked up 9 tries in his 24 games for the club.
    8) Mark Broadhurst the former NZ heavyweight champion was involved in one of the most famous and longest brawls in semi final history. The 81 semi against Newtown. After taunting the Newtown forward pack in the lead up to the game he was set upon by Steve Bowden at the first scrum and despite holding his own with the fists, was dropped by a sickening headbut which was followed by another soon after. Bowden was sent from the field and Broadhurst managed to finish the game despite massive facial injuries. He wore the maroon and white 44 times.
    7) Joe Galavao came to Manly after two underwhelming seasons at Paramatta who had signed him after being told to retire by South Sydney. He has currently played 60 games for the club and won the premiership with them in 2011 to add to the one he won with Penrith in 2003.
    6) Tony Iro, the veteran of 25 tests for NZ, he spent four seasons with Manly. his combination of size and speed meant he could play centre, wing or in the backrow.
    5) Craig Innes was a former all black who came to Manly via stints with Leeds in England and the Perth western reds. Described by Terry Hill as the greatest centre he ever played with. He was also probably the best kiwi player to never play for NZ. Unfortunately his time at Manly coincided with the super league war and as Manly were aligned with the ARL he was over looked for test selection. However he did play one test for the rest of the world team against Australia. This was the only time a rest of the world game was given test status. The man known as postie won a premiership with Manly in 96.
    4) Keiren Foran could quite easily end up atop of this list. At just 21 years of age he has already played 67 games including the 2012 grand final triumph. He was in the running for the 2011 Dally M but was ruled out of contention following suspension.
    3) Darrell Williams became the first New Zealander to win the NSWRL premiership in 1987. He was a versatile player who could play anywhere in the backline and is currently a member of the manly board.
    1) Matthew Ridge was lured to Manly by Graham Lowe from the all blacks where his path to the all black fullback spot seemed to be blocked by world player of the year John Gallagher. Ironically within a week of signing for Manly Gallagher would sign to play league with Leeds in England. After just nine games Ridge was selected to play for the kiwis. He would go on to captain them and retire as NZs highest ever point scorer with 168. He signed to play for the Auckland warriors during the superleague war but legal action prevented him from playing. After sitting out the first 9 rounds of the year he returned to Manly, scoring 30 points in one game against Wests and also won the premiership with them.



    Sorry bout any mistakes- I done this on my phone.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2012
  6. Drew-Sta

    Drew-Sta Moderator Staff Member

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    Drew-Sta for the Bluebags.

    ---

    For the future of the game

    My time here in Tonga has provided me with a unique insight to rugby league. It’s raw here; there’s no pretence. There’s no tangible difference between how a prop hits it up here when compared to Australia; there’s aggression, intent. Australia and Tonga are no different in this matter. And yet, there’s something more to it by these islanders.

    I’ve talked to a lot to people who are involved in the game. They tell me the game is on the cusp. Even though the Ikale Tahi, the Tongan national rugby union team, is followed like a religion here, rugby league has its place. The Tongan’s love the impact, the speed and intensity of rugby league. The power of union here is due to the success of Ikale Tahi in the 2007, which swept the team into a whirlwind for the game. It has been strong ever since.

    Success breeds success they say. The success of Ikale Tahi on the world stage elevated a country of one hundred thousand to the elite in rugby. Consequently, children in the island nation grew up wanting to ruck and maul, learn how to scrum and goal kick.

    Rugby league simply needs a lick of the same success to propel it into the front of mind in the little Pacific nation.

    This is where people need to look beyond their NRL club. Already amongst us, in the elite of the 16 team competition sit talented Tongan’s who wow us with their unique and exciting brand of footy. Michael Jennings, Manu Vatuvei, Fui Fui Moi Moi, Feleti Mateo, Jeremy Smith, Willie Tonga, Andrew Fifita – all players of exceptional talent. Israel Falou, despite his defection to the AFL, is of Tongan descent.

    And yet, each of them have represented either New Zealand or Australia at some point. Sure, they may have played for Tonga during the World Cup when they were less known and developing as players, but the problem is they’re poached.

    This is the issue.

    Australia and New Zealand allow the repatriation of players at the expense of a developing nature like Tonga. Why? Why take a player who should be guided into representing his nation and robe him in the colours of a country that is overflowing with talent?

    For the benefit of the game, Australia has to examine its place as the dominant nation in rugby league and decide whether its success is worth crippling the development of the game in places like the Pacific Islands.

    This may seem like a generic post. In fact, it will probably read something like that. But it’s actually not.

    I’ve lived in Tonga for twelve months now and I’ve seen a people that need to believe in something. They need something to throw their hope and their dreams behind; something that can give inspiration and aspiration to children, your adults and parents alike.

    The difference between the props in Tonga and the props in Australia is a matter of belief and responsibility; they believe in what they’re doing and understand the responsibility they bear. They’re not playing for money, they’re not interested in winning even; it is a matter of belief and they believe they’re responsible for inspiring the village they play for.

    People in Tonga don’t have much. Some are farmers, some are trades people, but most are poor. People who have little need something to hold onto. Rugby union has provided that for the people of Tonga. Villages, businesses and individuals contributed what little money they had to support a team they believed in, and Ikale Tahi played with the knowledge of the responsibility that held.

    The administrators for rugby league in Australia and New Zealand need to realise that Tonga, and the rest of the Pacific Islands, need heroes and teams to fall behind. They need to hold onto the success their national teams provide, and currently we’re robbing them of their heroes. We’re robbing Tonga of the chance to develop and that isn’t just hindering the development of these sports, but holding back entire nations.

    It’s time for Australia to take a bigger look at what their success is costing the rest of the rugby league world. It’s not just success they’re denying the Pacific. It’s hope.

    Word count - 721 or thereabouts.
     
  7. Rexxy

    Rexxy VideoAdmin

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    Rexxy Bags

    “Look at all these rumors-running me everyday- I just need some time-some time to get away”

    They are the bane of managemen but the currency of fans. Rugby League runs on rumours like the Airbus runs on Avfuel. Are rumours detrimental to the game, or a bit of harmless fun? As someone who has dealt in the willfully art of trading news and gossip, I am starting to come around to the belief rumours are the language of the mischievous and the stock in trade of the insecure.

    Listening to a lesser sports show, the hosts ask people to ring up with their rumours. Never asking the source of their story they let people make up fanciful things. “Craig Bellamy to coach the Roosters”, “Soward is on the nose with the training staff”. “Brett Finch to return to Sydney”. Now like the butterfly that flaps it wings, and the fallout extending to an earthquake in China, each rumour it destabilises the club. How does Bellamy negotiate in good faith with his current club if he has been linked to elsewhere? How does Soward prepare each week?

    Now years ago, players changing clubs was a discussion limited to pub tables. Today we have the internet, gossip columnists even instant message services like twitter. A good rumour can travel the world five times, before the truth can get out of bed and put its pants on. On League Unlimited there are hundreds if not thousands of pages dedicated to speculation. And nine times out of ten the rumours prove false.That is a lot of hot air expelled at an amazing rate.

    Often the info comes from “insiders”. People who have a contact at the club. But just because someone says “so and so is leaving” it doesnt mean they are in a position to really know the truth. There is many a slip between cup and lip”. Circumstances change, bigger offers come in, a board can over rule the Coach.

    In the recent Cooper Cronk negotiations, a fan was told by the CEO that Cronk coming was definitely coming to the club. That fan went public on the forums. When Cronk the shifty eyed Gronk stayed at Melbourne like he was always going to - that fan had considerable egg on face. But maybe, just maybe, when the CEO said Cronk was coming it was true.

    Rumours sell papers and make people watch TV. See how Danny Weidler works. He deals in innuendo, gossip, half truths and speculation. His piece on Nine news is always timed to get people watching after the ad break, when inevitably the juicy morsel promise turns into a flaccid jode of disappointment.

    Viewers care because it reinforces their beliefs. It confirms that a club doesn't know what it is doing, or that management are inept or that the club is under (or over, take your pick) the salary cap.

    But that’s a long bow to draw if you just heard the words, “Soward and Price don’t get on”.

    I guess gossip makes people feel better by allowing them to put their own spin on things. The subconscious is a great servant but terrible master. If we tell ourselves something enough times it turns out to be believed.

    Rumour obviously sells well enough and the market is there, and it seems that reality is whatever you perceive it to be. And while that can be harmless enough in a “victimless crime model” what about those who take advantage in order to profit from these human failings? danny Weidler.

    The final example is the famous Dragons T Shirt debacle of 2009, when a newspaper said they had seen Dragon Premiership Tshirts made before the game was played. This was used as “evidence” the Dragons were too cocky and overly confident. They needed to be taken down a peg.

    There was no tshirts, the source turned out to be Brian Waldron.

    Although King Rat was chased out of the club , his methods were well learnt by the other rats still on that corrupt ship. Cooper Cronk going to the Dragons in 2013 is a case in point.

    Did you hear the one about susan?-some say she's much too loose- that
    came straight from a guy who claims he's tastin' her juice.

    Hear the one about Dousty? He’s one man about towny. Some say he’s in it for the love, but others say its Crownies.

    With apologies to the Timex Social Club
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2012
  8. Cliffhanger

    Cliffhanger Coach

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    Shoulder On​


    Few issues in Rugby League are causing more controversy at present than the shoulder charge and whether or not is should be outlawed. It has polarised league fans as well as past and current players. Personally, I am undecided on the matter; on one hand I recognise the importance of player safety, but on the other hand, shoulder charges are a big part of the spectacle, we all love witnessing those bone crunching big hits; well, when they are not above the shoulders. These hits when executed properly can be game changing and carry no ramifications; however the potential for damage when the point of contact is high can be horrific. One thing is clear; this is no black and white issue.
    Rugby League is a physical sport, pain has long been acknowledged as part of the game; we watch each match expecting a physical contest, and we celebrate the bone rattling tackles and glorify the hard hitters of our game. That said, there has always been a line, that is why spear tackles are outlawed, why grapple tackles and high shots are penalised, there is a limit to how rough the game should be, and a line that when crossed turns the game from being entertaining to disturbing. Nobody enjoyed watching Greg Inglis’ should charge on Dean Young, and while injuries are a risk in any sport, no player should ever have to fear for their lives on a football field. We draw a line for a reason.

    I think in many of us is a fear that if we outlaw the shoulder charge it will set a precedent. First the shoulder charge, what next? Tackles with more than two defenders? The game needs to stay true to itself, but nostalgia aside, this should come down to whether the shoulder charge inherently dangerous and the potential for them to go wrong. Nobody wants Rugby League to become touch football, but we also do not want to see any of our Rugby League players become paralysed or pick up debilitating long term injuries. Unlike spear tackles, shoulder charges can be perfectly safe if the point of contact is a part of the body which can absorb the force such as the chest, it is when these hits slip a little high that there they became seriously dangerous, how likely they are to go wrong needs to come into this discussion.

    I have little doubt that in 20-years’ time I will whine about how “the game is not quite what it used to be” or how “the modern day game resembles a match of touch football more than the Rugby League spectacle of yesteryear.” Like most Roosters’ fans some of my favourite Rugby League memories are of some of the legal hits Adrian Morley landed on opponents during his time in the NRL. We all have some good shoulder charges in the highlight reels locked up in our own memories, but this decision should never be about what we want to see, nor what the players believe is the right way to go, the NRL has done the right thing by having a group of medical professionals investigate the issue. In this era we are blessed with such advances in technology, these advances have allowed us to measure the forces of such hit as well as better understand the problems they cause, too many NRL fans tend to fear that any change to rules is a regression towards a watered down version of what the game was. However, removing an aspect of the game which can lead to serious head trauma from the game is not regression; it is an example of how science helps our game evolve.

    I am a big fan of physics and biomechanics and how science enlightens us, I will be eagerly awaiting the findings of the medical committee on this matter. In the meantime, I think I might be spending some more time on that fence, hoping that there is some middle ground.
     
  9. Russell Crowe's Band

    Russell Crowe's Band Referee

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    Charging in for the Warriors.

    750 words between the ****


    *******

    Daring to Dream

    This season is like no other I have experienced living in the house of a diehard Rabbitohs supporter. Not only is there a consistent expectation of winning matches, but my father believes that his club, South Sydney can win the premiership.

    To me this is still a foreign concept that still seems too hard to grasp.

    For most of my early child hood Souths were perennially awful. So much for "Pride of the League"
    Seriously, they would routinely be beaten by 50-60. One year Cronulla won 42 nil over Souths and Andrew Ettingshausen scored 5 try’s.

    It was not such a big deal. The Sharks were good so my dad was happy for me and we would go and watch the Raiders teams of the early 90's.

    Then in 1999 something weird happened. Souths did not completely suck.
    They defeated Canterbury on a Sunday afternoon in round one and backed up the next week against Canberra.
    All up Souths won 10 games in 1999 led by Craig Wing and Darrell “Tricky” Trindall. Souths had a young exciting team.
    In fact, had they not completely bombed out with 7 straight losses to end the year, they could have made the finals. They had great victories that year over St George, Newcastle and the Bulldogs that made you think that Souths could be building, finally.

    Then they were gone, gunned down by News Limited in the "rationalisation" that saw Wests merge with Balmain, St George acquired Illawarra and Manly merge with Norths.

    However they fought on. They marched in the streets and went to the high court. By some moment of “vibe and serenity” they beat News Limited in court. The NRL re admitted Souths to the competition and they would be back in 2002.

    2002-06 were basically the same rubbish of the old days.
    They won the odd game. The 2002 season had a good start (highlighted with a win in Canberra in round 2) The same men who led them into strife, fought the law and won had control of the club again and were leading them into financial oblivion.
    My father became a member in 2002 and has been ever since. He would go and see thrashings. Souths were back but they were the same old Souths.

    What came next was probably the biggest moment in the clubs history. WA businessman Peter Holmes A Court and Oscar winning actor Russell Crowe made a bid to privatise the team. They needed over 75 percent of the members vote to take over. The vote just got over the line. To my father this was as big as any finals win. The team would be saved and a new era of professionalism would be brought to the club.

    The next year they finally made the semis. 2007 saw The Rabbitohs win 12 and lose 12 games. A 50 percent record that would see them finish 7th and lose to Manly in week one of the finals series. That was it. Souths in the finals. It was a lot of hype for one match at Brookvale Oval.



    So now here we are at round 21 in the 2012 competition. The Rabbitohs are second. Yes. Second

    30 points. 13 wins. A winning record. Think about that. 1989 was the last time. No Iphone, Internet, did they have colour TV in 1989? Michael Jackson was still kind of black.

    This Souths team can win the title. They have coach of the year candidate who has learned his craft under mastermind Craig Bellamy. Souths have dynamic forwards in Burgess and Taylor. Match winning representative forwards is something I have not seen Souths ever have. A Superstar in Greg Inglis and finally a legitimate spine. Inglis, Sutton, Reynolds and Luke have been fantastic all season. Finally John Sutton is fulfilling his potential. It’s great to see.

    Even when those players are out Peats and Merritt are more than capable replacements.

    They play an exciting brand of footy. Glorious patches of play mesmerise the faithful. Last week, Inglis streaked away from the dragons to score, my father leapt to his feat with jubilation rarely seen. Souths were dominant, legitimate and finally contenders.

    I’m not sure they will win the competition. But at second place and 5 wins in a row they are hard to resist. The Bulldogs and Storm will have something to say about it, but finally, South Sydney fans like my father. Fans of the formerly “hapless” Rabbitohs are daring to dream.

    *****


    Thanks to Warrior Defense and Vin Fizz. well done on doing something. i like the cut of your respective jibs.
     
  10. Timmah

    Timmah LeagueUnlimited News Editor Staff Member

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    Timmah for the Bluebags


    The truth about Origin
    As a New South Welshman, it’s been a sad and sorry seven years watching the once-mighty Blues crash to consecutive defeats under the strength and power of a much-vaunted Queensland side.

    In interacting with Maroons fans over various forms of online and social media, it’s become plain to me that there is plenty of chest-beating and bitter, angry jibes pointed at those South of the border. And instead of getting calmer and enjoying each successive victory, the so-called “banter” goes from bad to worse.

    To find out why this is, we really need to go back over three decades to the birth of Origin. For 70-plus years, Queensland was an aside to a brilliant New South Wales powerhouse, who won countless “Interstate” clashes. With few rules surrounding eligibility all the running was with the Blues, and the big money in Sydney always attracted the starry eyed young players, who never looked back. After such an extended period of hardship and disappointment, the concept of State of Origin became reality in 1980, and Queensland began their quest for redemption. Tired of being “little brother”, they won the first few matches which then became three-game series. It was deeply personal and winning meant more than anything – whether you wore the jersey or merely cheered from the stands.

    With the passion in the Sunshine State clearly evident following the birth of Origin, south of the border, it wasn’t so much the case. For the first few years at least, it appeared New South Wales had enjoyed victory for so long it didn’t seem to matter quite as much that they lost early on. Once the late 1980’s and early 1990’s rolled around, NSW again enjoyed a period of dominance but it was still in many ways taken for granted.

    Flash forward to 2012, after the loss of seven straight series. Despite the run of outs, interest in Sydney and around the state is at an all-time high. The last two matches at ANZ Stadium have sold out and don’t show any signs of not doing so in future years, and the viewing figures (in Sydney in particular) are breaking records year-on-year. Contrast this with Queensland’s attitude in 2006, on the eve of a potential fourth straight series loss themselves, where some within the ranks were suggesting Origin was a “myth” or “the concept was dying”.

    Perhaps the saddest part for the Blues going into the next series in 2013 is that we face the prospect of losing Ricky Stuart as coach, after his signing at the Parramatta Eels. While the results aren’t on the money just yet, Stuart had brought the team back from the brink, restored confidence, and had them just a solitary point from series victory. It was the relative consistency of selection, forming a core of players in key positions that saw Queensland rise to power in the way they have, and Stuart seemed to have not only grasped that, but implemented the same strategy in 2012. The potential loss of “Sticky Ricky” could set that process back a year, or possibly more, as the side readjusts to a new method.

    As for the fans – the most important thing is to not lose faith. Even if a new coach has to be found, there was enough shown during the last two series to suggest the Blues aren’t far from matching their competitors in all departments. The squad has a superb blend of youth, skill and experience which will provide a stable base for a number of years to come. This again contrasts with Queensland, where much of their spine and core players are ageing. In the last few seasons, Petero Civoniceva and Darren Lockyer are among a few names to have moved on.

    Whether it’s fans or players, there is no doubting Queensland’s ongoing passion now, particularly given their current run. However, the truth is that Origin victory matters more to New South Wales now that it did to Queensland in the 1980’s. Queensland have finally found their footing against a once-great foe and it’s time for the boys in Blue to seek redemption and break the stride of the Maroons. They have to fight hard. We can’t let it become eight.

    I’ll leave our enemies in the Cane Toad state with one final thought:

    New South Wales – the state where Origin never dies.
     
  11. joshie

    joshie Live Update Team

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    Game, set, match.
     
  12. madunit

    madunit Super Moderator Staff Member

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    WARRIORS - 255

    Vin Fizz - The Oldest "WON" In The Book - 86
    A look back at the life of the Sharks, the writer reveals that there's more to the game than a solitary win at the end of the year. Well written.

    WarriorDefence - Manlys Top 10 Kiwis - 82
    A look at some of the best New Zealanders to ever play for Manly. Pity there was only 9 players. Solid effort nonetheless.

    Russell Crowe's Band - Daring To Dream - 87
    A good piece revisiting Souths miserable record since their minor premiership in 1989 and poses the possibility of a Souths premiership in 2012.

    BLUEBAGS - 355

    Drew-Sta - For The Future Of The Game - 92
    Magnificent piece that is passionately and logically written. Never have truer words ever been spoken!

    Rexxy - Untitled - 89
    A magnificent look at the effect and prevelance of rumours in the rugby league landscape today. Great topic.

    Cliffhanger - Shoulder On - 87
    Argument for both sides of the shoulder charge debate with some very good points made.

    Timmah - The truth About Origin - 87
    A summation as to why QLD were considered more passionate in Origin for so long and how now its New South Wales who are more passionate.

    Bluebags win 355-255

    POTM - Drew-Sta (Bluebags)
     
  13. Willow

    Willow Administrator

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    Well played both sides.

    Great captain's knock Drew-sta. :clap:
     
  14. WarriorDefence

    WarriorDefence Juniors

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    Haha there is only 9- I missed number two- it was gonna be matai
     
  15. Drew-Sta

    Drew-Sta Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks guys!

    Well done Baggers, onwards and upwards!
     
  16. Russell Crowe's Band

    Russell Crowe's Band Referee

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    well done bluebags.
     
  17. Monk

    Monk Referee

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    Congrats Bluebags on the win.

    RCB - Fantastic job keeping the Warriors afloat, seriously. What you're having to go through isn't fun, im sure. But you're doing one hell of a job and I admire you for that.
     
  18. Russell Crowe's Band

    Russell Crowe's Band Referee

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    Well I gotta play hard for my big free agent contract next season monk.

    :)
     
  19. Drew-Sta

    Drew-Sta Moderator Staff Member

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    I feel your pain RCB, and admire your ongoing efforts :)

    If you want a home next year, the Baggers would be proud to throw you a jumper.
     
  20. Monk

    Monk Referee

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    Bunnies will offer you all the Burger Rings you want. We have contacts...
     

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