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Non Footy related discussion

Messages
2,241
I can understand being in a wheelchair some of the rubbish (comments) that must get thrown your way.

I understand where you're comming from re natural remedies too.

Just to make life extra fun I also have sleep apnea......(I do it all, if you know what I'm saying)

Dear friend of mine (retired nurse) when in Sydney earlier this year (daughter very ill). I wasn't coping with pain levels etc gave me an essence called breathe easy. I couple of drops inside the mask each night after you clean it. Magic stuff. I've just ordered and recieved my 2nd bottle.

I swear by it.

Magic.

Don't feel as though I'm drowning when I put the mask on. Makes breathing so much easier.
I’ve got Breathe Easy. I use it whenever the kids get a little sniffly. Works a treat.
 

BxTom

Juniors
Messages
2,211
Who here is advocating that?

Professional advice? The trusted professional could vary wildly depending on your culture. I'm a believer that for the most part Western medicine is pretty good, but to discount the practices of cultures thousands of years older than ours it pretty f**kin' dumb. If they were wrong their cultures wouldn't be thousands of years old.
I didn't discount traditional medicine. I specifically stated the problem was an OVER reliance. There are many people that refuse professional advice, instead relying soley on some shaky advice. There have been many court cases with people being charged for allowing children to die rather than seeking proper advice. I am well aware that many modern cures have their roots in traditional medicine - aspirin, and St Johns Wort for a couple of many.
 

DinkyDi

Juniors
Messages
2,212
And that advice would be specific to you. It's not a blanket rule. Your specialist is also a specialist in his field and his tools are western medicine. Unless he is also a specialist in natural remedies and practices from other cultures then he is giving you info based on his knowledge. Nothing wrong with that, but it doesn't make other treatment options void.
If you read my original comment correctly, I actually was referring to my case.
 

DinkyDi

Juniors
Messages
2,212
^ Your original comment. I asked you how. Then you were asked to give examples, to which you stated that you can’t remember.

Therefore, your comment is deemed invalid unless you give examples which can then be verified either way. Pretty simple logic really….
It is also pretty simple logic, that I can not remember them all. Simply put, any alternative medications, I will ask before I consume.
 

soc123_au

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
16,075
Good luck with it Socky.

My old lecturer punched an able bodied guy out for parking in a disabled zone once. The lesson was cancelled while he told the story. It was the guys attitude he got the shits with more than anything.

It would get very old very quickly trying to work out whether you can get somewhere physically.

Half of the west doesn’t even have a proper footpath .

I can’t imagine your challenges.
It helps to have a good sense of humour and patience. It might sound weird, but I've actually experienced some very positive things that I wouldn't have encountered as someone able bodied, some of those things are among my fondest memories. You get the other end of the spectrum as well, but I tend to disregard most of those, some people like the guy you mentioned parking in the disabled spot are just ignorant mostly and don't understand the ramifications of their actions.

You're right on the footpaths. Henry street up near the courthouse is terrible, the "ramps" to get up the gutters after crossing the road are impossible in a chair. It's improving though, Mulgoa Rd is great as well as parts of High St. The biggest drama is most disabled toilets. Most of the outside ones require a key, which is easy enough to get, the problem is reaching the key hole and then opening the 3 tonne door from a chair. I think the dickheads that design that shit assume that if you are in a chair you must have a carer with you to take care of that crap. I find that the hardest to work around. I rang the council a few years ago about fixing the big lip on my driveway as getting up it in a chair requires hitting it at speed and throwing your weight back to lift the front wheels. I've flipped it a few times and ended up flat on my back in the middle of the road with cars driving around me. I even said I'd pay for it, just I needed permission to do it. They said they would send the engineer out to have a look. I gave it a week and called to see what was happening and was told the engineer had been out and said it was fine as it was and met the standards. I asked them to send him back out and come and talk to me and show me how to navigate it in a chair, I even offered to give him a thousand dollars if he could get up it in a chair. They wouldn't do it. lol. A few weeks ago they came and put a footpath in, but still wouldnt do the driveway. With the footpath it's fine though as the ramps on to the street at the intersections are smooth as butter.
 

DinkyDi

Juniors
Messages
2,212
Therefore, don’t make assumptions that, in this instance, you aren’t prepared to justify, verify logically, or provide evidence for. Especially when you “can’t remember them…….”
Assumptions am I? Clearly you can not read. I was talking about my experiences, and the medications, that I am on. This is the only link that I can find to support my claim. No doubt this will not be to your satisfaction.

 
Messages
2,241
Assumptions am I? Clearly you can not read. I was talking about my experiences, and the medications, that I am on. This is the only link that I can find to support my claim. No doubt this will not be to your satisfaction.

Clearly, you CANNOT comprehend…..

The article you posted clearly defines the meaning of contraindications. No doubt there. However, it does NOT define nor supports your assumption that Naturopathic Medications does more harm than good.

If you care to read the article that you’ve posted, contraindications can occur with drugs, surgery, etc. Therefore, based on your logic, do drugs and surgery do more harm than good?

You’ll have to find more reliable evidence to substantiate your claim.
 
Last edited:

DinkyDi

Juniors
Messages
2,212
Clearly, you CANNOT comprehend…..

The article you posted clearly defines the meaning of contraindications. No doubt there. However, it does NOT define nor supports your assumption that Naturopathic Medications does more harm than good.

If you care to read the article that you’ve posted, contraindications can occur with drugs, surgery, etc. Therefore, based on your logic, do drugs and surgery do more harm than good?

You’ll have to find more reliable evidence to substantiate your claim.
Actually I can COMPREHEND. Omfg, why are you turning this into an argument. I know what my doctor told me. At no stage did I claim that naturopathic medications does more harm than good. All I said was that medical advise is required before hand.
 
Messages
2,241
Actually I can COMPREHEND. Omfg, why are you turning this into an argument. I know what my doctor told me. At no stage did I claim that naturopathic medications does more harm than good. All I said was that medical advise is required before hand.
So, you never made that claim huh? So…..

In some cases, naturopathic medications, can cause more harm than good.
Source:
Post in thread 'Non Footy related discussion'
https://forums.leagueunlimited.com/threads/non-footy-related-discussion.485699/post-14995978

Evidence-based as well.

Hmmmm………..
 
Messages
10,486
It helps to have a good sense of humour and patience. It might sound weird, but I've actually experienced some very positive things that I wouldn't have encountered as someone able bodied, some of those things are among my fondest memories. You get the other end of the spectrum as well, but I tend to disregard most of those, some people like the guy you mentioned parking in the disabled spot are just ignorant mostly and don't understand the ramifications of their actions.

You're right on the footpaths. Henry street up near the courthouse is terrible, the "ramps" to get up the gutters after crossing the road are impossible in a chair. It's improving though, Mulgoa Rd is great as well as parts of High St. The biggest drama is most disabled toilets. Most of the outside ones require a key, which is easy enough to get, the problem is reaching the key hole and then opening the 3 tonne door from a chair. I think the dickheads that design that shit assume that if you are in a chair you must have a carer with you to take care of that crap. I find that the hardest to work around. I rang the council a few years ago about fixing the big lip on my driveway as getting up it in a chair requires hitting it at speed and throwing your weight back to lift the front wheels. I've flipped it a few times and ended up flat on my back in the middle of the road with cars driving around me. I even said I'd pay for it, just I needed permission to do it. They said they would send the engineer out to have a look. I gave it a week and called to see what was happening and was told the engineer had been out and said it was fine as it was and met the standards. I asked them to send him back out and come and talk to me and show me how to navigate it in a chair, I even offered to give him a thousand dollars if he could get up it in a chair. They wouldn't do it. lol. A few weeks ago they came and put a footpath in, but still wouldnt do the driveway. With the footpath it's fine though as the ramps on to the street at the intersections are smooth as butter.
Yeah, you are also right about positives.

I worked with a blind guy once and we were sharing an office. I couldn’t understand something and I forgot he was blind and asked him to have a look at it.

As I handed it to him he said “ I’d love to but…”

I tried to apologise he stopped me and laughed and told me not to worry about it as I wasn’t the first. So I read the offending passage out and he put it in tsp terms. What a champion.

That lecturer said it was a good idea to keep a disability mindset when you are wandering around shops and stuff as an exercise sometimes. It is eye opening.

We have a long way to go on this stuff. Build a footy stadium but people in chairs still can’t go the bathroom…and I presume you’re a big strong lad.
 

soc123_au

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
16,075
Yeah, you are also right about positives.

I worked with a blind guy once and we were sharing an office. I couldn’t understand something and I forgot he was blind and asked him to have a look at it.

As I handed it to him he said “ I’d love to but…”

I tried to apologise he stopped me and laughed and told me not to worry about it as I wasn’t the first. So I read the offending passage out and he put it in tsp terms. What a champion.

That lecturer said it was a good idea to keep a disability mindset when you are wandering around shops and stuff as an exercise sometimes. It is eye opening.

We have a long way to go on this stuff. Build a footy stadium but people in chairs still can’t go the bathroom…and I presume you’re a big strong lad.
I used to be, Muscular Dystrophy wastes the muscles away. Mine is a bit of a weird variant. The most common type is truly horrific, symptoms start at a few years old and by the time the victim is around 10 to 12 they are wheelchair bound. Most dont make it much past their 21st.

I didn't have noticeable symptoms until I was 21 and that only became apparent after an injury. My legs were the first to go, upper body I was still pretty good even by the time I couldn't walk anymore. Now I cant get my arms past 90 degrees and my 1yo could beat me in an arm wrestle. I was lucky that I was very fit and pretty built before it kicked in. It gave me a bit of muscle to chew through before ending up a spud. I also had the advantage of knowing what was coming once I was diagnosed, so I had a bit of time to set myself up for it, like buying the place I worked at to have financial security etc. The trunk is starting to go now which is a bit of a merkin, but shit happens.

It's good you have a bit of awareness from someone in my states perspective when you are out and about. It's not usually something one thinks about until you are confronted with it. It's the little shit you take for granted and don't think about normally that frustrates me the most. Things like wanting to go into a shop but there is a little step. Our favourite kebab joint is an example. Lucky they have menu log, but I miss just walking past somewhere and being able to go and and get what I want without all the prior planning. Spontaneity is very underrated lol.
 

Aliceinwonderland

First Grade
Messages
6,049
Yeah, you are also right about positives.

I worked with a blind guy once and we were sharing an office. I couldn’t understand something and I forgot he was blind and asked him to have a look at it.

As I handed it to him he said “ I’d love to but…”

I tried to apologise he stopped me and laughed and told me not to worry about it as I wasn’t the first. So I read the offending passage out and he put it in tsp terms. What a champion.

That lecturer said it was a good idea to keep a disability mindset when you are wandering around shops and stuff as an exercise sometimes. It is eye opening.

We have a long way to go on this stuff. Build a footy stadium but people in chairs still can’t go the bathroom…and I presume you’re a big strong lad.


I use a walking stick, she is my friend and she is pink. I named her Gracie. Because originally about 10 years when I first started using 'Gracie' I was more than a bit resentful.

I then figured out if I made 'Gracie' my friend it would help. So I named her after a Yorkshire lady who could sing pretty good.



Gracie is now my friend.

No where near the issues of Soc......but perspective and laughter sure does help.
 

soc123_au

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
16,075
I use a walking stick, she is my friend and she is pink. I named her Gracie. Because originally about 10 years when I first started using 'Gracie' I was more than a bit resentful.

I then figured out if I made 'Gracie' my friend it would help. So I named her after a Yorkshire lady who could sing pretty good.



Gracie is now my friend.

No where near the issues of Soc......but perspective and laughter sure does help.
We all play the hand we are dealt, your issues are no less significant than mine or anyone else's. I imagine your reluctance to make friends with Gracie was much the same as mine when I had to get in a chair. I fought it for ages and suffered for it, along with the grief it caused friends and family as I stopped doing shit to avoid it. Then once I snapped out of it and got on board, it was like, how good is this. lol. My ex wife still rolls her eyes at some of the things I get up to using the chair given how hard she fought me to use one to start with. She might be my ex, but she will always be a legend in my eyes for what I put her through.
 
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