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Random Tigers articles from the media

Tigerm

First Grade
Messages
5,767
Worth a read


Have the Wests Tigers finally landed on the players that can end their NRL finals drought?​


It's the most wonderful time of the year because the sun is shining, the Christmas leftovers are still good enough to stick on a sandwich and Wests Tigers fans are starting to hope again.

Signing John Bateman caps a heavy recruitment drive for 2023, with Api Koroisau, Isaiah Papali'i and David Klemmer all heading to Concord in what could bring about the kind of change that usually only comes when a southerly drops the temperature on a scorching summer afternoon.


The Tigers have been here before, of course.

Footy optimism is as much a December tradition as cleaning up an unsuspecting younger relative at backyard cricket and forgetting what day of the week it is during the time between Christmas Day and New Year's Day.

It's never worked out the way they wanted, but there's every chance things are a little different this time around.

This latest revival isn't built on hope, it's built on cold, hard cash and using that cash to buy the best of what's around.

There are very few problems in rugby league that can't be solved by throwing some money around and, after 11 straight seasons without finals football, the Tigers have got nothing to lose and everything to gain by dropping some fat stacks on the table.

In their 22 years of existence, the joint venture's success, such as it's been, has been built on either building from within or buying low on players who, for whatever reason, can be snagged below their market value.

Both approaches work well in theory, but it's not a surprise to see the club go a different way. You can hardly go a month without seeing an exhaustive list of players the Tigers once had, either as juniors or in the early days of their career, who have gone on to greatness with other clubs.

And turning value signings into stars is a process that works extremely well until it doesn't and, when it doesn't, you can get stuck in a perpetual cycle of starting again, over and over again.

So why not open up the wallet? The transfer market is like anything else: if you can't get out of it, get into it.

The Tigers have had big recruitment drives before, but never anything like this.

Back when Ivan Cleary was coach — which feels like a century ago given what's happened since — Ben Matulino, Russell Packer and Josh Reynolds all came on big money with bodies that were already breaking down.

Moses Mbye was capable of so many things, but they never found the spot at which he could be the most capable.

Adam Blair came from the Storm in what was supposed to be the transfer that pushed them to a second premiership, but ended up beginning a series of broken dreams that were crushed like cans on the Leichhardt Oval hill.

However, this is not that.

Klemmer, Bateman, Koroisau and Papali'i are all established talents, blue-chip stocks, with runs on the board and reputations that precede them, the way lightning precedes thunder.

Koroisau marks the first time the club has signed an incumbent New South Wales Origin player since Terry Hill joined the Tigers for their inaugural season, all the way back in 2000.

He is the sort of dummy half who makes the players around him better: It's no coincidence that Nathan Cleary's rise began when Koroisau joined the Panthers, nor should it be a surprise that, even as Penrith crushed the rugby league world beneath their feet, Koroisau continued to improve.

His game is built on smarts more than athleticism, so it makes sense that his style would age well as he gained a greater understanding of his own skills.

The three-time premiership winner is the club's most-important recruit, but the others are just as impressive.

Despite falling out of representative favour for reasons that remain unclear, Klemmer's production for the Knights remained exceptional even as the club struggled — his 155-metres-per-game last year was the fifth-most of any forward in the league.

Papali'i's journey to the club might have been rocky, with regular talk the New Zealander was considering backflipping and staying with Parramatta, but he's in black, white and gold now and, given he was seventh in the entire league for metres gained last season — as well as fourth for post-contact metres — it's fair to say the Tigers have landed one of the best backrowers in the world.

Bateman was in that category during his time with Canberra in 2019-20 and still has that football in him — maybe just in patches, but that could be enough.

The Englishman is mean enough to out-fight a razorback and provides the kind of attacking scope that can make the most of the metres that are sure to be on offer.

Even if Bateman isn't the same force he was in his Raiders days, it won't be crippling. There is a strength-in-numbers situation going on here.

If one of the four doesn't live up to the billing that would be a disappointment, but the duties of leading the club back to the promised land is spread across the quartet.

Nobody is being asked to put the whole of the club's vast territory on their own back. It's a heavy weight, but they can share the load.

It's no good having a silver spoon on a paper plate but, despite finishing last in 2022, there's still other things to like about the Tigers roster.

Daine Laurie and Adam Doueihi were two bright spots in last year's wooden-spoon campaign and Stefano Utoikamanu, who lost much of last year to injury, was formerly one of the most-promising young props in the league.

Luke Brooks will once again bear the weight of expectations that have crippled his career and act as the target for a decade's worth of frustrations.

It would probably be for the best for both player and club if Brooks began his 11th year in first grade with a fresh start somewhere else, but the Tigers will dance with the one that brought them at least one more time and it's been many years since Brooks was surrounded with this type of talent.

Add all that up and there's something here. Maybe not enough for Tigers fans to book their finals tickets now, but it's better than nothing.

How much of that something will turn out to be substantial remains to be seen but, in terms of their roster, the Tigers have done just about all they can do.

They've tried the rest, so why not buy some of the best and see where it takes them?

With a wooden spoon in hand, after years stuck in the cold, what have they possibly got to lose?
Good read, a few nightmare shivers from some of the signings mentioned😅

But IMO, the club has got it spot on, so far. You can only sign the best available and we just about have I reckon.

I just hope it doesn’t end in tears with Brooks failing again, he now has no more excuses surely?

We have one more signing to come, will be interesting who he is and where he will be playing?

The first 5 rounds should tell us a bit about how the team is gelling: No reason we can’t be 5&0, but 3+ Wins, would be a fantastic way to start the year, IMO👏

R1-Titans
R2-Knights
R3-Dogs
R4-Storm
R5-Broncs
 
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Ned Kelly

Juniors
Messages
1,086
Good read, a few nightmare shivers from some of the signings mentioned😅

But IMO, the club has got it spot on, so far. You can only sign the best available and we just about have I reckon.

I just hope it doesn’t end in tears with Brooks failing again, he now has no more excuses surely?

We have one more signing to come, will be interesting who he is and where he will be playing?

The first 5 rounds should tell us a bit about how the team is gelling: No reason we can’t be 5&0, but 3+ Wins, would be a fantastic way to start the year, IMO👏

R1-Titans
R2-Knights
R3-Dogs
R4-Storm
R5-Broncs
I would love it if one of those wins was against the Bulldogs. If we finish the season higher than them on the table I would be laughing until the following season.
 

Ned Kelly

Juniors
Messages
1,086
This is apparently two days old but I only saw it today.


I thought we only had one spot left but this article says we have two.

Interesting slant to say this could help us lure Moses but I'm not to keen on paying him $600,000 at this stage of his career. Maybe Parra are willing to chip in.
 

Shredder

Juniors
Messages
1,478
Reading this, I get the impression the last spot may be an upgrade to a Dev player or a trial and trainer.
 

Ned Kelly

Juniors
Messages
1,086
This is a prediction from Fox sports.

I like it.


Tim Sheens to guide Tigers back to finals

Tim Sheens is back baby - and so is Benji Marshall - and so are the Wests Tigers.

The Tigers haven’t played since 2011 back when - you guessed it - Sheens was coaching Marshall was the star playmaker.

We’re tipping Sheens and Marshall to get Luke Brooks back to his best and the halfback will end his streak as the most experienced player in the NRL without featuring in finals.
 

Ned Kelly

Juniors
Messages
1,086
Some other predictions from the above article that I also want to come true.

Parramatta to miss the top eight

The Eels have lost six players from their 2022 strongest 17 and will struggle to make finals, let alone return to the grand final.

Reed Mahoney ( Bulldogs), Isaiah Papalii (Tigers), Marata Niukore ( Warriors), Oregon Kaufusi ( Sharks), Tom Opacic (Hul) and Ray Stone (Dolphins) have all departed.

They haven’t exactly replaced them with like-for-like players, with Josh Hodgson (Raiders), J’maine Hopgood (Panthers), Jirah Momoisea (Knights), Jack Murchie (Warriors), Daejarn Asi (Warriors) joining.


Bulldogs to miss the top eight

The best administrator in the game, the best young coach in the game and some of the highest-profile recruits in the game.

Unfortunately for Phil Gould, Cameron Ciraldo and Viliame Kikau, expectation brings pressure and we’re tipping it all becomes too much in 2023.

There’s plenty of hype but it’s tough enough for veteran coaches to make finals let alone rookie and we’re expecting Dogs to finish about 10th.
 

Tigerm

First Grade
Messages
5,767
Some other predictions from the above article that I also want to come true.

Parramatta to miss the top eight

The Eels have lost six players from their 2022 strongest 17 and will struggle to make finals, let alone return to the grand final.

Reed Mahoney ( Bulldogs), Isaiah Papalii (Tigers), Marata Niukore ( Warriors), Oregon Kaufusi ( Sharks), Tom Opacic (Hul) and Ray Stone (Dolphins) have all departed.

They haven’t exactly replaced them with like-for-like players, with Josh Hodgson (Raiders), J’maine Hopgood (Panthers), Jirah Momoisea (Knights), Jack Murchie (Warriors), Daejarn Asi (Warriors) joining.


Bulldogs to miss the top eight

The best administrator in the game, the best young coach in the game and some of the highest-profile recruits in the game.

Unfortunately for Phil Gould, Cameron Ciraldo and Viliame Kikau, expectation brings pressure and we’re tipping it all becomes too much in 2023.

There’s plenty of hype but it’s tough enough for veteran coaches to make finals let alone rookie and we’re expecting Dogs to finish about 10th.
9th will look good for us then🙁
 

Ron's_Mate

Bench
Messages
3,904
‘The best I’ve ever seen’: Inside Sheens and Marshall’s Tigers revolution

By Michael Chammas
January 13, 2023

The interview was only 10 minutes old when Tim Sheens casually dropped a line that is certain to excite long-suffering Wests Tigers fans.

“The kids here are outstanding,” the newly minted head coach of the Tigers told the Herald. “They are better than I’ve seen at this club.”

It’s a huge call from a man who brought through Benji Marshall and Robbie Farah, before overseeing the development of James Tedesco and Mitchell Moses in the final days of his first stint at the club. But there are high hopes for a host of Tiger cubs headed by Justin Matamua, Fonua Pole, Kitione Kautoga, Sione Vaihu, Solomon Saukuru, Tuki Simpkins, Kit Laulilii, Luke Laulilii, Tallyn De Silva, Lachlan Galvin and Michael Tannous.

The Tigers are unashamedly turning back the clock. They’ve somehow picked up a new, hi-tech centre of excellence and plonked it back in the mid-2000s.

Down the corridor, Marshall and Farah are calling the shots. And the very same philosophy that guided the Tigers to premiership glory in 2005 is being applied to a crop of players largely oblivious to what success looks like.

One thing Sheens-coached players will tell you is the coach demands every person plays two positions. It’s why hooker Jake Simpkin has been training at halfback over the summer, and fullback Daine Laurie in the halves.

New recruit David Klemmer says he feels like a kid again, learning to play a brand of football many modern-day players are forced to forget in the top grade.

“Why shouldn’t it be that way, mate?” Sheens fires back.

“We use a football to score tries. To me, if it’s not about skilling them up and playing some football, why the hell are they here? Our philosophy is that we want to put points on the board. Robbie, Benji and I are the same in that regard.

“If you score, you get the ball back. And if you’ve got the ball, technically, unless you throw an intercept or drop the ball stupidly, they can’t score. The rule book says score more points than the opposition … and I like following the rule book.”

For the past decade at the Wests Tigers, it has been a seemingly never-ending cycle of hope, quickly replaced by disappointment.

There was the promise of the era of the Big Four – Tedesco, Moses, Luke Brooks and Aaron Woods. Then Ivan Cleary’s bus rolled out of town as fast as it drove in, with the young coach lured back to the Panthers. Cleary was replaced by Michael Maguire’s strangling style of football, which seemed to choke his own team.

Api Koroisau, John Bateman, Isaiah Papali’i and Klemmer – along with Sheens, Marshall and Farah – are the new faces of the club’s fourth stab at a rebuild.

“I made the point when I was head of rugby league, before I was even coaching, that in three years this club would turn the corner big time,” Sheens said.

“And not just wait three years to do it, it’ll be turning that corner all the way. We have a five-year plan. It’s not a major change in coaches, it’s just a transfer.

“Benji already has a say in who is coming to the club. There’ll be no, ‘Oh, I want to get rid of this player because it’s not my team’ from Benji.”

The subtle crack at his predecessor speaks for the frustration felt by many at the Wests Tigers, who grew tired of Maguire privately blaming the roster for his underwhelming four years at the helm.

It recently got back to Sheens that Maguire had told people the veteran coach was coming home to take his job, a notion Sheens strongly refuted.

“You know differently, and I know differently,” Sheens said. “And if I was coming for his job, I’d have a five-year contract and I haven’t. It’s not the case. I’m a bit disappointed in that.

“It didn’t work out for Madge, but in saying that I didn’t particularly want the job straight up, as you very well know who I chased [Cameron Ciraldo], and got criticised for offering him [a five-year contract]. It’s funny how he’s now at the Bulldogs for five years, but anyway.”

While the Tigers went all-in for Ciraldo, the disappointment was quickly allayed by the excitement surrounding the Sheens-Marshall package deal.

The reality of the situation is Sheens handed Marshall, only 12 months retired, an NRL head coaching job from 2025 without having watched him coach a day in his life.

It’s a gamble in anyone’s books. But Sheens is convinced that his protégé has all the traits required to make it as a coach.

“He’ll kill it,” Sheens said. “He’ll make it, easy. There’s just no doubt. “In two years’ time he’ll be ready to go easy. In fact, I reckon in 12 months’ time I’ll have to watch my back.”

When Marshall sat down with Sheens to audition for the job that was only ever going to be Ciraldo’s until he exited the one-horse race, the meeting was just a few minutes old when Sheens realised that his former star five-eighth was ready.

Marshall, having made a successful transition from player to media commentator in his roles for Triple M and Fox League, no longer had a purpose.

“First thing Benji said was, even though he was earning good money and he was working with you guys in the media, he wasn’t getting any satisfaction out of it,” Sheens said.

“The satisfaction he gets now if you sit around and see him talk to players and converse with them, and skill them, and work with them. You should see it, they just gather around him. They listen to everything he says. And he’s got the background to say, ‘Well, I’ve done it’. He’s getting a lot out of that and Robbie is the same.”

“I always said they were too smart for their own good. You could never bluff them. You had to be smart for those two kids to give you respect because they don’t suffer fools those boys.

“I’m an interim coach, basically. And I’m happy about that. I have my say still. I’ve still got the big stick, but at the end of the day if they want to run with something and I’m happy with it, I let them run with it because that’s teaching them what they need to do.”

One of the major tasks of 2023 will be for Marshall and Farah to unlock halfback Luke Brooks. The much-maligned halfback, who struggled to fit into Maguire’s game plan, is heading into the final season of his lucrative deal.

“The first thing you do is set up a game plan where he is involved, Offensively playing on his best side of the field that he plays on – the left side, with him at halfback,” Sheens said.

“People are on him and on him and on him. Media … he seems to be a whipping boy. He’s withstood that really well. Benji and I are working really hard with all the spine, not just him, all the spine, to finally get a combination because the club hasn’t really settled on a combination for some time.”

“You can’t expect him to win every game for you. Everyone seems to think it’s the only thing a good halfback can do. Admittedly, there’s a lot of pressure on the pivots, but it’s not just the seven.

“To say the No.7 is the one that runs the game is not always true. A No.9 and a No.6 a No.1 is even more important. If you have a good team you’re playing with 14 men. That’s having your fullback turn up everywhere. If you haven’t, you’re playing with 12 men.”

Playing with 13 men, let alone 14, has often been a battle for the Wests Tigers.

“I promise you if we lose games, we won’t get beat,” Sheens says.

“People say, ‘Oh, what does that mean’? It means we will be having a go right until the end of the game.”

 

westerntiger

Juniors
Messages
723
“If we lose games, we won’t get beat”

Awesome. Maybe Sheensy can politely ask the other team not to go too hard on us before the game
 
Messages
11,438
‘The best I’ve ever seen’: Inside Sheens and Marshall’s Tigers revolution

By Michael Chammas
January 13, 2023

The interview was only 10 minutes old when Tim Sheens casually dropped a line that is certain to excite long-suffering Wests Tigers fans.

“The kids here are outstanding,” the newly minted head coach of the Tigers told the Herald. “They are better than I’ve seen at this club.”

It’s a huge call from a man who brought through Benji Marshall and Robbie Farah, before overseeing the development of James Tedesco and Mitchell Moses in the final days of his first stint at the club. But there are high hopes for a host of Tiger cubs headed by Justin Matamua, Fonua Pole, Kitione Kautoga, Sione Vaihu, Solomon Saukuru, Tuki Simpkins, Kit Laulilii, Luke Laulilii, Tallyn De Silva, Lachlan Galvin and Michael Tannous.

The Tigers are unashamedly turning back the clock. They’ve somehow picked up a new, hi-tech centre of excellence and plonked it back in the mid-2000s.

Down the corridor, Marshall and Farah are calling the shots. And the very same philosophy that guided the Tigers to premiership glory in 2005 is being applied to a crop of players largely oblivious to what success looks like.

One thing Sheens-coached players will tell you is the coach demands every person plays two positions. It’s why hooker Jake Simpkin has been training at halfback over the summer, and fullback Daine Laurie in the halves.

New recruit David Klemmer says he feels like a kid again, learning to play a brand of football many modern-day players are forced to forget in the top grade.

“Why shouldn’t it be that way, mate?” Sheens fires back.

“We use a football to score tries. To me, if it’s not about skilling them up and playing some football, why the hell are they here? Our philosophy is that we want to put points on the board. Robbie, Benji and I are the same in that regard.

“If you score, you get the ball back. And if you’ve got the ball, technically, unless you throw an intercept or drop the ball stupidly, they can’t score. The rule book says score more points than the opposition … and I like following the rule book.”

For the past decade at the Wests Tigers, it has been a seemingly never-ending cycle of hope, quickly replaced by disappointment.

There was the promise of the era of the Big Four – Tedesco, Moses, Luke Brooks and Aaron Woods. Then Ivan Cleary’s bus rolled out of town as fast as it drove in, with the young coach lured back to the Panthers. Cleary was replaced by Michael Maguire’s strangling style of football, which seemed to choke his own team.

Api Koroisau, John Bateman, Isaiah Papali’i and Klemmer – along with Sheens, Marshall and Farah – are the new faces of the club’s fourth stab at a rebuild.

“I made the point when I was head of rugby league, before I was even coaching, that in three years this club would turn the corner big time,” Sheens said.

“And not just wait three years to do it, it’ll be turning that corner all the way. We have a five-year plan. It’s not a major change in coaches, it’s just a transfer.

“Benji already has a say in who is coming to the club. There’ll be no, ‘Oh, I want to get rid of this player because it’s not my team’ from Benji.”

The subtle crack at his predecessor speaks for the frustration felt by many at the Wests Tigers, who grew tired of Maguire privately blaming the roster for his underwhelming four years at the helm.

It recently got back to Sheens that Maguire had told people the veteran coach was coming home to take his job, a notion Sheens strongly refuted.

“You know differently, and I know differently,” Sheens said. “And if I was coming for his job, I’d have a five-year contract and I haven’t. It’s not the case. I’m a bit disappointed in that.

“It didn’t work out for Madge, but in saying that I didn’t particularly want the job straight up, as you very well know who I chased [Cameron Ciraldo], and got criticised for offering him [a five-year contract]. It’s funny how he’s now at the Bulldogs for five years, but anyway.”

While the Tigers went all-in for Ciraldo, the disappointment was quickly allayed by the excitement surrounding the Sheens-Marshall package deal.

The reality of the situation is Sheens handed Marshall, only 12 months retired, an NRL head coaching job from 2025 without having watched him coach a day in his life.

It’s a gamble in anyone’s books. But Sheens is convinced that his protégé has all the traits required to make it as a coach.

“He’ll kill it,” Sheens said. “He’ll make it, easy. There’s just no doubt. “In two years’ time he’ll be ready to go easy. In fact, I reckon in 12 months’ time I’ll have to watch my back.”

When Marshall sat down with Sheens to audition for the job that was only ever going to be Ciraldo’s until he exited the one-horse race, the meeting was just a few minutes old when Sheens realised that his former star five-eighth was ready.

Marshall, having made a successful transition from player to media commentator in his roles for Triple M and Fox League, no longer had a purpose.

“First thing Benji said was, even though he was earning good money and he was working with you guys in the media, he wasn’t getting any satisfaction out of it,” Sheens said.

“The satisfaction he gets now if you sit around and see him talk to players and converse with them, and skill them, and work with them. You should see it, they just gather around him. They listen to everything he says. And he’s got the background to say, ‘Well, I’ve done it’. He’s getting a lot out of that and Robbie is the same.”

“I always said they were too smart for their own good. You could never bluff them. You had to be smart for those two kids to give you respect because they don’t suffer fools those boys.

“I’m an interim coach, basically. And I’m happy about that. I have my say still. I’ve still got the big stick, but at the end of the day if they want to run with something and I’m happy with it, I let them run with it because that’s teaching them what they need to do.”

One of the major tasks of 2023 will be for Marshall and Farah to unlock halfback Luke Brooks. The much-maligned halfback, who struggled to fit into Maguire’s game plan, is heading into the final season of his lucrative deal.

“The first thing you do is set up a game plan where he is involved, Offensively playing on his best side of the field that he plays on – the left side, with him at halfback,” Sheens said.

“People are on him and on him and on him. Media … he seems to be a whipping boy. He’s withstood that really well. Benji and I are working really hard with all the spine, not just him, all the spine, to finally get a combination because the club hasn’t really settled on a combination for some time.”

“You can’t expect him to win every game for you. Everyone seems to think it’s the only thing a good halfback can do. Admittedly, there’s a lot of pressure on the pivots, but it’s not just the seven.

“To say the No.7 is the one that runs the game is not always true. A No.9 and a No.6 a No.1 is even more important. If you have a good team you’re playing with 14 men. That’s having your fullback turn up everywhere. If you haven’t, you’re playing with 12 men.”

Playing with 13 men, let alone 14, has often been a battle for the Wests Tigers.

“I promise you if we lose games, we won’t get beat,” Sheens says.

“People say, ‘Oh, what does that mean’? It means we will be having a go right until the end of the game.”

Thanks for posting.

The spin in full swing and none of it especially compelling.

The guts of success is having good players and that’s something Madge never had, so I think Tim should show a bit more decency and respect where it’s due.

And failed to land Ciraldo and made us look like blathering idiots, sacked Madge early and we came dead last. Benji was complete crap at media.

The spin cycle continues, the love of Benji and all that, zzzz.

Less talk and more action I think Tim. Spare us the carry on until you’ve actually achieved something and done something good other than land Bateman.

And get Madge’s name out of your f**king mouth. No one tried harder.
 

Fordy20

Juniors
Messages
1,909
Well said TSP.

This journo is an idiot. The philosophy of 2005 was to give control of the team to a dominant halfback to do as he saw fit. Instead, the club packed Hastings bags and we're going back to playing left and right halves this season.
 

Ned Kelly

Juniors
Messages
1,086
According to foxsports.com.au

TIGERS BOLSTER FORWARD PACK

Tim Sheens has signed yet another forward as his overhaul of the Tigers top 30 continues after taking the reigns ahead of the 2023 season.

The master coach has already signed the likes of Apisai Koroisau, Isaiah Papali’i, David Klemmer and John Bateman — and has now set his sights on a Manly young gun.

James Roumanos, 23, has reportedly signed with the merger club according to WWOS and will ply his trade for the Western Suburbs magpies in the NSW Cup.

Roumanos made his NRL debut last season and has only featured in first grade once.

The middle forward was a member of the Bulldogs 2021 NRL squad before making the move to Manly ahead of the 2022 season.

Roumanos has previously represented Australia as a schoolboy and was an impressive performer for Lebanon at the World Cup late last year.


I know nothing about him. Any opinions?
 
Messages
11,438

Teammate sheds light on impact of brutal Luke Brooks criticism​


I wonder if they seriously think he doesn’t deserve most of it?
No one has said he isn’t a bad guy, he’s just a reasonably ordinary No 7 in rugby league.

No mention of him asking us for a release 3 times last year. Tim was sick of seeing him knock on his glass office door, just used to wave him away.

$900k a year for rookie performances.

Actually got worser. That takes effort.

We almost lost half the side when he won the best player in the club that year. Maybe they should have upped and left actually!

Brooks is ….useless.

We got rid of Hastings instead of him. Worst decision since signing BJ.
 
Messages
11,438
Brooks and the saga of his incompetence is the nrl equivalent of Prince Harry.

The more Tim supports Brooks, the worse Brooks looks.

It’s pathetic.

Tim’s gone all wokey on us. And knowing an ex-players of the Tim era, at times, Tim was one of the angriest coaches ever to drop a clipboard. He was a shocker. He stood over and bullied countless players in the guise of “ professionalism”

Tim is too stupid and ignorant to pick up on the fact that by trying to save Brooks in this way, he is digging Brooksys grave deeper.

He must think he’s back in the 195Os.

The days of us filth accepting any representation made to us without question are long long gone. Red flag to a bull.

I get the impression that Tim’s been under a rock for a long time.

He even said the game hasn’t changed, well I think he’s in for a massive shock.

Accordingly I think our end of season position doomsday clock has to be set forward (towards the spoon) another notch to 12th.
 
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Wizardman

First Grade
Messages
7,305
I think Brooks will have a better 2023 for one reason and one reason only. The improvement of our pack will give him more chances to convert opportunities into points. He will still deliver a fair amount of f**k ups as he is just not very good. He needs to go if we can get a better half moving forward. The side badly needs a game manager.
 
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