4 Nations FINAL 2009 Papua New Guinea vs New Zealand

Discussion in 'Forum Sevens Matches' started by Pistol, Nov 22, 2009.

  1. Pistol

    Pistol Coach

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2004
    Messages:
    10,216
    Likes Received:
    0
    Forum 7s - 4 Nations - 2009
    PAPUA NEW GUINEA KUMULS V NEW ZEALAND
    [​IMG] -v-[​IMG]
    Titanic (c) --------LeagueNut (c)

    Game Thread:
    * Please note - This is a game thread only, therefore only game posts can be made here (Teams, Articles).
    * Any other posts may result in loss of points and is at the discretion of the referee
    * Only original articles, not used in previous games, will be marked by referees.​

    Naming Teams (F7s 4 Nations conditions):
    * 3v3 (+ 2 reserves for each team)
    * No 'TBA' or changing players named
    * Captains must stick with original teams named​

    FULL TIME (F7s 4 Nations Conditions): Sunday 29 November 2009 at 9pm (Syd time)

    REFEREE:
    Topic: The Big Time


    Venue: The Birds Nest, Beijing

    [​IMG]

    **The Referee Blows Game On!**
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    CLICK HERE FOR OFFICIAL WORD COUNTER
     
  2. Titanic

    Titanic First Grade

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2007
    Messages:
    5,836
    Likes Received:
    8
    [​IMG]

    From Daru to Kavieng and from Alotau to Wapenamanda,
    a nation holds its breath as its hardy team of wantoks,
    smeared with pik gris, wearing their arse tangets
    and with bolbols like kokonas, takes the field.

    [​IMG]


    Team


    tits&tans
    Willow
    Titanic

    Bench

    bgdc
    Tittoolate

    Good luck one and all

     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2009
  3. LeagueNut

    LeagueNut First Grade

    Joined:
    May 26, 2003
    Messages:
    6,693
    Likes Received:
    50
    [​IMG]

    The Kiwis burst onto the field with a fierce determination and desire to have a damn good piss-up with the opposition after the match...

    -----------------------------------
    Team:
    rayroxon
    madunit
    Jesbass

    Bench:
    LeagueNut (c)
    Dragon_psa

    Official cheerleader:
    Hallatia
    -----------------------------------

    Ringa pakia
    Uma tiraha
    Turi whatia
    Hope whai ake
    Waewae takahia kia kino

    Ka mate, ka mate
    Ka ora' Ka ora'
    Ka mate, ka mate
    Ka ora Ka ora


    Tēnei te tangata pūhuruhuru
    Nāna i tiki mai whakawhiti te rā
    Upane... Upane
    Upane Kaupane
    Whiti te rā

    Hī!
     
  4. Jesbass

    Jesbass First Grade

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2005
    Messages:
    5,797
    Likes Received:
    0
    [​IMG]

    Still recovering from a bout of concussion sustained at training, Jesbass runs onto the field for the Kiwis and immediately starts looking for flowers to press...

    ***

    The Big Time...Line (748 words between the stars)

    Life in the prehistoric world was tough. Unless you were a careers advisor, there were only three employment paths available to you: hunter, gatherer, and rugby league player.

    The game was fairly primitive back then. There was no limit to team size, and the equipment amounted to nothing more than a heavy rock to serve as the ball, and a wooden club for each player for fending purposes.

    The matches were decidedly longer than those in the modern day. To ensure even length halves for both sides, matches took place from sunrise to sunset on both days of the weekend. This also guaranteed a good crowd as the hunters and gatherers would…well…gather together to watch the spectacle on their days off.

    Teams like the Stone Age Sabre-tooths and the Neolithic Neanderthals would take to the field for hours on end in bloody and somewhat unruly competition.

    But with the advent of the wheel, and the subsequent increase in the pace of everyday life, combined with Generation B’s growing reputation for wanting everything to happen this epoch, the powers that be decided that the game needed to be shortened.

    Put simply, the critics were complaining, (because that is precisely what critics are wont to do), that rugby league was taking too long to watch. Apparently they wanted to be able to get home in time to watch their favourite cave drawings.

    With no developed means of tracking time outside of watching the sun and the stars, shortening the game would be a mammoth tusk – err, task. Those in charge of rugby league set a precedent for all league organisations that were to follow by establishing a committee. After far too much talking, someone finally decided to do something about the issue of time, and promptly invented the sundial.

    This chronological leap forward at the hands of our code brought humanity the gift of time keeping, enabling matches to be kept to a standard length of a pair of forty minute halves.

    As with any changes in rugby league, however, the fan base was divided. Opponents to what was perceived as a mere appetiser that had replaced the previous two day banquet of football, mobilised and resolved to lengthen the game by any means possible.

    Their initial methods were predictably primitive: they simply removed the marker stones from the sundials.

    As time telling technology improved throughout the ages, these generations of saboteurs became ever more brazen. Hour glasses were flipped over to extend matches. Candle clocks had their flames blown out before they could reach the halftime mark. Bells used to signal the end of each half had their clappers extracted. Mechanical clocks were wound backwards in an unintentional foreshadowing of daylight saving.

    Concurrently, rugby league scoreboard design improved after the game's officials invented literacy to make score keeping an easier task. This meant that the traditional giant abacus that would sit at one end of the ground first became a chalk board, and eventually an electronic display.

    Rugby league had brought both time and written language to the world, but rivals from within weren't the only threat. Outcasts of ancient society, mostly lepers and thieves, created their own brand of the game and named it rugby union. They were fiercely opposed to the fluidity and flair of league, refusing to adopt the time measurement system. As Roman historian and fervent unionite Rugbius Ludicrus wrote: “To restrain a rugby union match to a set length of time would only limit the tediousness and repetition of the game for which it is renowned.”

    Modern historians are in agreement that, in an attempt to wipe rugby league's influence from history, rugby fans deliberately recorded international league matches as conflicts of a far more deadly nature. Persia's tours to Greece, for example, where the visiting side was defeated by strong defensive efforts from Greek and Spartan clubs, were deceitfully named the Greco-Persian Wars. The regular matches between England and France that lasted for more than a century during the middle ages were misleadingly chronicled as The Hundred Years War.

    Rugby league survived all of this, and the historical record is slowly being restored as the union bias becomes further exposed.

    But what about those who demanded longer matches? Well, their descendants are still committed to the cause, albeit in a much more clandestine manner. Many are heavily involved in the game, and continue to attempt to lengthen matches.

    After all, you have heard of golden point, have you not?

    ***

    Sources:
    http://www.the-sundial-store.com/sundial-text/home-page-sundial-development.htm
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell_(instrument)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_timekeeping_devices
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greco-Persian_Wars
     
  5. Titanic

    Titanic First Grade

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2007
    Messages:
    5,836
    Likes Received:
    8
    [​IMG] Titanic for PNG - hops onto the field desperately trying to unravel the noodles he has unwittingly used as boot laces. (750 OWC between the dashes including title and words on the pic)
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------​


    [​IMG]

    The Big Time

    My legs wouldn’t keep still; the erratic spasms in my calves were distracting and only seemed to disappear for a second if I jumped on the spot two-footed.

    “Calm down wantok, when you hit the field you’ll be fine.”

    The calm authority of the deep, highlands voice poured a sense of security over my twitching soul, however the butterflies in my belly didn’t settle nor did my unfaithful legs as they independently prepared for “flight or fight”.

    The light was somewhat dim in the players' race leading onto Lloyd Robson Oval... like nothing I had encountered.

    Seventy-two hours earlier I had met the Kumuls' coach in the Port Moresby hotel lounge, where I was staying with my parents as I headed home from school to our highlands coffee plantation. The PNG squad was staying at the same luxurious facility as they prepared for their first ever Test against the unpredictable French*.

    I had barely spluttered out a greeting when I was invited to sit down and asked if I'd like to join the team for some training sessions over the next few days while they prepared.

    A not insignificant squad member of the Queensland Schoolboys side, where I boarded through my high school days, I was a conundrum to my coaches and mentors. At 17, I was 6’2” and over 16 stone. I wasn't blessed with great acceleration but I could compete with anyone my age over fifty meters. Yet it was my innate ability to identify gaps in both defence and attack that attracted the selectors rather than my modesty.

    “Well, what do you think? It'll do you good and give the local lads a bit of the Australian style to deal with… c'mon, is that "yes" or "no" or are you catching flies?” The whimsical grin stretched across the coach’s face belied his usually gruff manner but my mouth slammed shut as I tried to regain my usual composure.

    “Yes please sir, I would love to, just tell me when and where?” then realising where I was, “would you mind if I checked with my parents?”

    “Not a problem son, I had a chat to them before. See you on the bus at 7.30 tomorrow… I'll sort some gear out for you.”

    It was all so exciting, fitness was not the focus as it was in so many of my school sessions, moves, contact training and the coaches, cajoling, encouraging, analysing and rebuking constantly, unrelentingly as positive reinforcement flowed over the squad.

    “Lad, can I have a word with you?” It wasn't a question of course and I jogged, sweating hard, over to the defence coach, a broad shouldered, squat former hooker from Mt. Hagen.

    “How ya doing, getting enough water?” he checked my eyes and made me take a drink, then he leaned in close, “Two things, you're respecting these guys too much and they are beginning to target you… nothing personal just instinct. Secondly, John is getting too big for his boots so he's being set up for a long run under the posts. I know you can catch him but he doesn't. Run him into the corner and flatten him, okay?”

    I nodded. “John” was lock John Wagambie, legendary Kumul captain, showman and my hero… devastatingly quick through any gap but questions remained about his speed over distance.

    “Ambush” was whispered along the line as the teams packed a scrum on the right allowing the ball to travel to the left. A looping pass stuck to Wagambie's outstretched hands as he cut inside the defender marking up and was away. Both teams slowed, except the flying ball carrier and the 17 year old upstart.

    Looking at me over his shoulder, there was a big grin spread across his lean ebony features, the white of his mouth guard disappeared as he took stock of my reckless thundering charge. Accelerating anew he didn’t try to evade my headlong charge or anticipate the speed of my approach as I shepherded him towards the sideline. He’s mine.

    Impossibly, he snaked out a heavily muscled arm "smack bang" onto my exposed left temple. Down I went in an ungainly heap, barely able to recover enough of my senses to watch the soles of his boots scamper down field.

    Strong hands picked me up and as I took in the knowing grins on the other players' faces, our coach asked innocently, “Didn't I warn you about his fend? Welcome to the big time.”

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    * The Kumuls defeated France 28-8 in Port Moresby 1981.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2009
  6. madunit

    madunit Super Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2003
    Messages:
    61,144
    Likes Received:
    948
    madunit for New Zealand

    Big Time ‘What-Ifs’

    There are numerous stories of players who succeeded at the elite levels of our game which are repeated ad-nauseum, to inspire and give us hope.

    In contrast there are the stories of failures which we recall for a laugh or as a benchmark for more recent catastrophes.

    But what about the what-if stories? Some are trivial, some are odd and some are just plain unfortunate, yet they are all forgotten amongst the raucous celebrations and cheer surrounding great players and performances.

    Alf Blair and Jack Robinson - Out Of Time

    Alf Blair began his career with Souths in 1917. He took just two seasons to gain state selection. In 1920 he was selected to play for Australia. His debut would be the First Test against the Northern Union at Brisbane’s Exhibition Ground. But it seemed fate had other plans for him that woeful day.

    Blair and Balmain’s incumbent test centre, Jack Robinson were unable to make the venture to Brisbane with the rest of the team due to work commitments, so they opted to leave Sydney the day before their Test debut’s on home soil (Robinson played four tests in New Zealand in 1919). Unfortunately, Northern NSW was inundated with some of its heaviest rainfall ever and despite travelling by ship, car and train, the heavy floodwaters were too much and the two men arrived at the ground too late and were replaced by Queenslanders Harry Fewin and Neville Broadfoot.

    It was to be the last time Robinson was selected for Australia and it would take Blair another four years before he would be recalled, albeit for just one test. Fewin and Broadfoot failed to get selected again for Test duties as well. That day seemingly placing a curse on four great footballers.

    Bobby Lulham - Wrong Place, Wrong Time

    Balmain's dashing winger who blew everyone away in his debut year of 1947. He scored 28 tries and gained selection in the NSW side, playing in all four interstate matches. The next year he was selected in Australia’s 1948-49 Kangaroo squad to tour England and France. He scored a try on his test debut during the Third test against Great Britain on that tour.

    He struggled over the next few seasons, before a form reversal found him being considered for NSW and Australian honours again by the end of 1952.

    Then in 1953 he was embroiled in the most bizarre incident ever in Australian Rugby League. His mother-in-law accidentally poisoned him by adding rat poison to his cup of hot chocolate. She made two drinks and put the poison in one cup, intending to poison herself, as she felt guilty about her affair with Lulham. However, she forgot which cup was poisoned and Lulham accidentally drank the contaminated concoction. Lulham was hospitalised for a lengthy period, managing to survive. He was never strong enough to play again and announced his retirement.

    Those Magical Les Chanticleers - Double Time!

    In the 1950’s and 1960’s, France was a rugby league powerhouse. Tough, nuggety forwards, classy speedy, backs and great goal-kickers. People flocked to see them wherever they played.

    At the start of their 1960 Australian campaign, the French opted to visit Darwin, however they had a match to play in Perth against Western Australia. It was decided to send half their squad to Perth, the other half to Darwin and they would meet up in South Australia. While in Darwin they agreed to play against a hastily assembled Northern Territory team.

    So on May 14, 1960, France is on record as having beaten Northern Territory 42-14 in Darwin as well as defeating Western Australia 29-8 in Perth.

    These French sides of the 50’s and 60’s were very passionate about taking the game to the fans. In their three tours to Australia in this period they became the only Test nation to play and beat teams representing Western Australia, Northern Territory, South Australia, Victoria, Queensland and New South Wales. They also played against Monaro Division in Canberra.

    Yet still to this day they aren’t given the accolades they deserve for taking the game to these neglected areas of Australia.

    So let us rejoice some of the other big time performances. The what-ifs, the what-could-have-beens and the forgotten mavericks from abroad.

    All great players who were denied their dues.

    All lost to the Big Time.

    740 words, including title.
     
  7. tits&tans

    tits&tans Juniors

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2007
    Messages:
    800
    Likes Received:
    0
    [​IMG]
    tits&tans for the PNG Kumuls careers on to the pitch is his sanlunche, screeches to a halt in front of the millions of screaming Chinese fans, and realises he has forgotten his chopsticks and rice bowl.

    747 words (OWC) between the stars

    **************

    The Big Time

    “Space is big. You just won’t believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is.**

    Time is even bigger. In fact, it’s so big that it’s either infinitely measurable or finitely immeasurable. To decide how big time is, we need to decide whether time has a beginning and an end.

    Some argue that time existed before the beginning of space, but I believe these two beginnings coincided. If we assume that time has no beginning, then it must have existed for an infinitely long time back into the past. Therefore, it would have taken an infinitely large amount of time to reach this moment. As an infinite amount of time would have no end, then this moment could never have occurred. Therefore, time cannot be infinite, and must, in fact, have a beginning.

    Now, if we look forward to the future of time, things become tricky. If the universe is a closed system, then the current expansion speed won’t exceed the escape velocity of the system itself and the universe will begin to contract, eventually resulting in a Big Crunch. Time, by our current definition, would cease to exist and therefore be “proved” to be finite. But, if the universe is open, then it will continue expanding and time would never end.

    Whilst cosmologists battle these questions, we have measurements in place to determine, if not the absolute then at least the relative size of time. As league fans, I am sure you are even familiar with some of the following:
    Yoctosecond: time required to complete a particularly tough victory.
    Zeptosecond: variation of the time required for a Yank to understand League.
    Exasecond: time taken for a losing team to leave the field.
    Picoannum: time taken for Hopoate to invade another player.
    Time is a central concept to our modern lives, and has been since our ancestors crawled out of the primordial soup. We use time to sequence events (is it boots or shorts on first?), compare the duration of events (is the first half as long as the second?) and the intervals between them (how long should breaks be?), and to quantify the motion of objects (e.g. balls and teeth). Time brings regulation to our lives, without which we would be unable to function effectively; whether in the classroom, office, boardroom, or most importantly on the field. Without time, our game would not be what it is today.

    Our modern language reflects just how integrated time has become and how crucial time is in our favourite sport:
    Passing time – when the ball is in flight.
    Killing time – when the opposition is taking a beating.
    Time is on your side – being in control of the play.
    Time is of the essence – needing to take control of the play.
    Double time – get your ass moving down the field.
    Time out – the American weak-ass version of the period when a player needs to shake off a hit.
    Time flies when you’re having fun – as does blood.
    Timing is everything – the right angle at the precise second, determines whether or not it will fly through or sail past the uprights.
    Break time – a period of aggression designed to intimidate and hurt the opposition.
    And of course halftime and fulltime.

    Of all recent intellectual breakthroughs, perhaps the one that league players can relate to most is Einstein’s special relativity; that is the speed of light is the same for all observers, regardless of their frame of motion. Under “normal” conditions, the consequences match our common sense experiences, but under the particularly severe conditions of a league match (high speeds and pressures), the effects become quite apparent.
    Who hasn’t noticed:
    how slowly the last few minutes of a close game go?
    how one second can seem like an age when eyeing an incoming bomb?
    how those few seconds of ecstasy after scoring the match-winning try can last a lifetime?
    The answer is time dilation – clocks run more slowly at high speeds and time is effectively slowed down.

    The importance of time to our game is in no doubt; just try to imagine a match, let alone our entire sport, without the concept of time ... I rest my case.

    So, I’d like to take my hat off to time, without whom we would not be able to enjoy league in all its glory. Let’s hear a “big it up” for time. Woop, woop. Time is here to stay, big time!

    ****************
    ** With thanks to Douglas Adams' The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
     
  8. rayroxon

    rayroxon Juniors

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2007
    Messages:
    710
    Likes Received:
    0
    Rayroxon for the Kiwi's runs onto the pitch to the crowd chanting "Who ate all the pork buns? You did you did" and sheds a quiet tear....

    The Big Squeeze. (749 words)

    Rugby League presents opportunities to make the big time in the most unlikely ways. Here is one of them...

    *****​

    It was Friday on Hawk street. The locals would set up their chairs around the white washed walls of the Merrick's house and make small talk until dusk had settled. Timmy's dad would be in charge of the bbq and the families would eat and wait for the projector to turn the side of the house into the biggest rugby league screen ever. There, they would watch the game and cheer as one.

    That was the way Friday nights had been for as long as anyone could remember until, little Timmy Merrick took it upon himself to change it. It had been an unseasonably hot July day. Timmy had raced home from school to sit in front of the fan and cool off. His mum walked in not long afterwards and, laden with groceries she asked for help. Reluctantly, Timmy got up, grabbed a bag and took it to the kitchen. With his mind elsewhere he unloaded the shopping and in doing so, he spilt a bag of lemons all over the floor. Cursing his clumsiness, he put them into the fruit bowl and then remembered the words of his late grandpa "If life gives you lemons..."

    That night, Timmy Merrick set up his first lemonade stand on Hawk Street. Blessed with a keen business acumen, his grandpa's secret lemonade recipe and a philanthropist's heart, he gave the neighbourhood their first taste for free and they loved it; so much so that there was 10 minutes to go in the first half and they had drunk him dry.

    The next week, he came home early from school and doubled last weeks batch of lemonade. He set up his stand early and charged a modest fee for his beverage. The neighbours were only too happy to oblige and this time, he sold out during Fatty's pre game talk.

    The following week Timmy doubled his quantity once more. He set up his stand and was surprised to see some unfamiliar faces to Hawk Street. They were from the next street along. Apparently, there had been talk about Timmy's lemonade during the week. This word of mouth continued and soon, people from the next suburb were wandering across town to try Timmy's lemonade.

    September arrived and so did finals footy. The local team had made the finals for the first time in five seasons and one of the parents suggested that perhaps Timmy could go down to the game and set up his stall outside the Oval. Seeing as the game was on a Sunday, the neighbours all said they would come down and support him and the team as well incidentally. That day, Timmy was rushed off his feet. He had expected it to be a busy afternoon at the Oval, but given the heat and the customer numbers, he was overwhelmed. At the end of the day, Timmy had done well, but was disappointed. He thought to himself, maybe he wasn't ready for this step, maybe, he should be content making lemonade for Hawk street and its surrounds. Timmy couldn't help but think of his grandpa and knew he wouldn't quit so easy. His grandpa used to say "You're only as good as the team around you" and he was right. Right now, Timmy was a one man team. He would need to expand if he was serious about making his business bigger and competing seriously.

    Timmy came back the following week with a dedicated team of squeezers, pourers and sellers. They blitzed the Oval that afternoon and impressed management. They offered him a little stall on the western concourse for next season. Timmy couldn't believe the opportunity but knew he didn't have the funds to take it up. However, Timmy's grandpa, unbeknownst to Timmy had left him a sizeable sum in his will which his parents had taken in trust. On a whim, they took up the Oval's offer and Timmy would have a permanent stand of his own next season.

    *****​

    That was three years ago. Timmy's Lemonade is now a sleeve sponsor of the local team. Friday nights on Hawk street still take place. Timmy's dad still operates the BBQ and everyone still watches on. And, when the local team plays a Friday game and the neighbourhood catches a glimpse of the team's sleeve, someone always says "That Timmy Merrick sure has made the big time..."
     
  9. Willow

    Willow Administrator

    Joined:
    May 19, 2003
    Messages:
    77,842
    Likes Received:
    628
    Willow | PNG
    [​IMG]


    It's all about the timing

    The Big Time

    [​IMG]

    Big Ben: A bell tower at the Palace of Westminster in London.

    Big Ben is one of England's most photographed landmarks. It is the largest four faced chiming time-piece in the world, and the big fella celebrated his 150th birthday in 2009.

    In 1996, I made the point of driving into London and parking in front of Big Ben. I got there, found an illegal parking spot, turned off the engine and got out to take a snapshot. I was there for long enough to be told to move on by the local parking constabulary - they're used to it.

    But I did it. I made it to the big time.

    The Bite Time

    [​IMG]

    Harold Holt: Australian Prime Minister, presumed drowned in 1967.

    Harold was Prime Minister for only 22 months before he disappeared, claimed by the sea. Theories abound. Some say it was a lefty conspiracy and he was abducted by a Soviet submarine. Others say he became shark bait.

    It didn't take long before the jokes started and the taking of Harold has become part of the Aussie vernacular. My favourite is from rugby league's 'super coach'. When he finished his coaching career in 1987 at Cronulla, Jack Gibson once said that waiting for the Sharks to win a premiership was like "leaving the porch light on for Harold Holt".

    At the other end of the scale was dopey shock jock radio announcer Malcolm T Elliott. At a large gathering in the 1980s, former TV presenter Malcolm was employed to give the keynote address at a charity function. In attendance were a number of conservative Liberal Party officials. As is the custom, Malcolm opted to open his speech with a joke...

    "Ladies and Gentlemen, we have just received word that the underwater walking record has just been broken... Harold Holt has just surfaced in South America..."

    Deadly silence followed.

    Unfortunately, in the audience was Holt's widow, Dame Zara.

    Malcolm's career took a bit of a nose dive after that. For the record, I thought the joke was pretty funny.

    Alas, it appears that poor old Harold simply got caught in a rip and was dragged out to sea. Sadly, not the first to meet such a fate, and not the last. But Harold's brief status as PM and the mystery of it all elevated this pollie's career into the big time.

    The Byte Time

    [​IMG]

    Bill Gates: The Adonis of the computer world, the internet's sex god - or - the world's greatest geek?

    William Henry "Bill" Gates III hit the big time in 1980 when IBM approached Microsoft to write an operating system for their upcoming Personal Computer. Since then, the rich bastard has gone from strength-to-strength. The US courts took him on and to some extent managed to place a tether on the world's richest man.

    But Bill Gates is super powerful, even Wikipedia are scared of him.

    Nowadays, Billy the Kid gives to charity and has all sorts of PR operations on the boil. The bloke has so much hit the big time, that promoting his good side has a monetary budget similar in size to some the third-world countries he claims to be helping.

    The Real Big Time

    [​IMG]

    Maurice 'Hutch' Hutchinson: First grade rugby league player. Passed away 2009.

    A quick scan of the Rugby League Player's Encyclopedia will show a rich history of players that only played a handful of first grade games. Hutch was one such player. He refused to play for another club and once said that he'd rather play reserve grade for St George than play elsewhere.

    When Hutch made his first grade debut in 1974, he was fulfilling a life long dream.

    Hutch played one more game in that glossy and soluble veneer of 'big time'. But the fact is, he had already hit the big time, for real. I'm not not talking about success as some people understand it. There are countless players just like Hutch, unheralded, and many of whom cherish that moment where they ran onto the pitch with fellow first graders. It must be a life moment that stays close to the heart forever more.

    For most of us, we can but imagine... how good would it have been?

    You can have your clock towers, your billionaires, and your shark lunch PMs. I'd give up all of it for just for one run in the first grade.

    The real big time.

    | 740 words |
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2009
  10. Non Terminator

    Non Terminator Coach

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2005
    Messages:
    17,427
    Likes Received:
    2
    [​IMG]

    Full Time - I will be refereeing this match it seems, so just to let you know the marking has begun, so STAY TUNED and good luck to all.
     
  11. Willow

    Willow Administrator

    Joined:
    May 19, 2003
    Messages:
    77,842
    Likes Received:
    628
    Thank you Time Keeper.

    Good luck one and all. :thumn
     
  12. Titanic

    Titanic First Grade

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2007
    Messages:
    5,836
    Likes Received:
    8
    A wonderful final effort team. The season has been long and well contested. Thanks Willow and tits&tans again for your commitment and to bgdc and Tittoolate for their support from the bench.

    LN and the rest of you Kiwis... another tough contest that will go either one way or another unless I am mistaken and then it would be reversed... good luck.

    Over to you NT, may you not have a sleepless night over our musings.
     
  13. Jesbass

    Jesbass First Grade

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2005
    Messages:
    5,797
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well done to both teams, and good luck to the ref! :D

    What a great contest. I love this game...probably more than I should! :lol:
     
  14. Hallatia

    Hallatia Referee

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2006
    Messages:
    26,444
    Likes Received:
    0
    \\\\:D/:clap:\\\\:D/GO KIWIS!! *takes out pom-poms*
    [​IMG]

    The Kumuls came riding out this 4 nations final day
    To "The Birds Nest" in Beijing, they had made it all the way
    When all at once a mighty herd of red eyed birds they saw
    A-plowing through the ragged sky and up the cloudy draw

    Their brands were still on fire and their beaks were made of steel
    These birds were black and shiny and their hot breath you could feel
    A bolt of fear swept the feild as they thundered through the sky
    For they saw the Kiwis coming hard and heard their mournful cry

    Yippie yi Ohhhhh
    Yippie yi yaaaaay
    Kiwis that can fly?
     
  15. bartman

    bartman Immortal

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2003
    Messages:
    41,024
    Likes Received:
    93
    Good luck to both teams in this final - the last players standing after a long F7s season!
     
  16. rayroxon

    rayroxon Juniors

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2007
    Messages:
    710
    Likes Received:
    0
    It's been a blast gang, you kumul kids are alright.

    Kiwi's - loved every second of it. You are the wind beneath my windows and the cheer in my cheerios.

    Over to you NT, mark on!
     
  17. Non Terminator

    Non Terminator Coach

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2005
    Messages:
    17,427
    Likes Received:
    2
    NEW ZEALAND

    Jesbass - The Big Time...Line (OWC 748)
    Score: 89
    First of all if you don't mind me saying, watch out for putting your Word Count between the stars, almost incorrectly marked the penalty. Anywho, I enjoyed your post, which combined a good knowledge (as proven by the references) of history with some classic Rugby League humour. Some interesting reading. Now, for your interpretation of the topic, well, you put it to a play of words (which I'm pretty sure hasn't been used so far in the tournament, so points for originality there). If you were allowed more words in the limit, I would've liked to see your interpretation of history to contact what it would've been like on the field with the players. Well done.

    Madunit - Big Time "What-Ifs" (OWC 721)
    Score: 91
    A strange piece, in a good way. Once again showing that you are not the master of your destiny and things can just plainly go horribly wrong, especially in the "big time". You've also given completely different examples of interpretation of the topic. I must say that you have studied this well. A very interesting read indeed. You could've used a modern example that we could have related to (not that I can think of one at the top of my head) but you've chosen a historical look, so there is something to be learnt. Just another series of classic tales around the great sport. Well done.

    Rayroxon - The Big Squeeze (OWC 749)
    Score: 87
    Your article has taken a twist on the topic, since it's not revolving around a player, but "the big time" is easily noted here. It definitely reminded me of one of those "feel good movies", it was a good story though (the main difference between your article and a feel good movie). I must say, I would've liked to hear maybe a little more about the local team, but the word limit definitely capped the chance of that. A great light-hearted read.

    PAPUA NEW GUINEA

    Titanic - The Big Time (OWC 745)
    Score: 89
    This one really reminded me of the tale when Gould told Fittler to run at the big bloke instead of step (got smashed too). If the previous story was unheard to you, that would've been a great twist revolving around the topic of "the big time". Stories like this interest me really, it was an extremely enjoyable read.

    Tits&Tans - The Big Time (OWC 747)
    Score: 92
    An interesting take on the topic, really pushing the emphasis of time and it's control on the sport. It's something we all look at, something we love and something we hate. I would hope the concept of "break time" also revolved around a well deserved Gatorade. It is possibly one of the best takes on a topic I've seen this competition. There really isn't much else to say other than great job.

    Willow - It's All About The Timing (OWC 735)
    Score: 86
    As good as it was, other than a few bits here and there it did take a while to really dig into the league content. I know the set up required this to happen, which enabled the league message to really sink in very well. It would be amazing to see a player like that these days be so loyal to one club.

    Final Score:
    NEW ZEALAND 267 - PAPUA NEW GUINEA 267
    After a double count and a triple count, I hate to say it but this one is still undecided. I must say the pieces here were amazing, and it really took some digging in to the heart of each one. After all of the stress and hard work however, I hate to say it (again) but the show isn't over quite yet.
    Player of the match: Tits&Tans (Papua New Guinea)
     
  18. Hallatia

    Hallatia Referee

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2006
    Messages:
    26,444
    Likes Received:
    0
    hey Josh, could we get a point because I threw in a cheer?
    I would be happy with just one point for it...
     
  19. Non Terminator

    Non Terminator Coach

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2005
    Messages:
    17,427
    Likes Received:
    2
    Ok, with all seriousness, we move into extra time with this result. As it is read from the website;

    So, either a reserve or a captain is due to make one more article each, both due 9pm tomorrow. Both captains will be PM'd. Is everyone a-ok?
     
  20. Hallatia

    Hallatia Referee

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2006
    Messages:
    26,444
    Likes Received:
    0
    no, I thought I deserved at least half a point for my effort and you wouldn't have had to go through that ...:crazy:
     

Share This Page