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The Game Future NRL Stadiums part II

Perth Red

Immortal
Messages
48,688
Does the roof of a stadium add much to the cost?
You see all those legendary college football stadiums in the states that don't bother with the roof and I wonder if it is because of cost savings.
Because American sports fans are tougher and more fanatical than here lol. Most of them roofless stadiums are in states where it’s fricking freezing during the football season. They Just breed them tougher than us in warm weather lol.
 

baselinepanther

Juniors
Messages
2,146
Because American sports fans are tougher and more fanatical than here lol. Most of them roofless stadiums are in states where it’s fricking freezing during the football season. They Just breed them tougher than us in warm weather lol.
It helps that theres 15 times the loops then us , but also ..most Australians live in temperate climates while these fans in Boston , Chicago & Detroit etc are used to those extreme conditions. They live in them.
If the temp dropped to -10 in Miami, or LA or Phoenix suddenly the crowds at games in those cities would most definitely be adversely affected.

Canberrans are the toughest fans we have here in Australia because we are used to our weather & a coolish night in Sydney that would deter fans there from attending a sporting event would not put Canberrans off.
 

TheRam

Coach
Messages
11,377
I think it was initially. I’m a big cricket follower and I think I read that it was a game made up to keep the players fit during the winter months.

So blame cricket

I do. That's why I don't watch cricket either.
 

TheRam

Coach
Messages
11,377
Yeah I agree the young players are a bit of a turn off. There is nobody with the class of a Federer or Nadal, although they are a hard yardstick.

I am not a fan of American football but I appreciate that they are supreme athletes. If you wanted to get brilliant athletes playing RL you could do a lot worse than picking up college athletes who didn’t quite make NFL squads.

This. I have pointed this out before. I can't believe we don't. It is a no brainer to me.

There are that many superior athletes in the US that just don't get a chance for whatever reason that surely a well studied talent scout that focuses their attention on the US could pick up at least 2 or 3 high quality project players each season. I would be no different then picking up a project player from the Pacific Islands. The up side for RL in Australia and the US long term would be fantastic and incredible.
 

Colk

Juniors
Messages
1,487
This. I have pointed this out before. I can't believe we don't. It is a no brainer to me.

There are that many superior athletes in the US that just don't get a chance for whatever reason that surely a well studied talent scout that focuses their attention on the US could pick up at least 2 or 3 high quality project players each season. I would be no different then picking up a project player from the Pacific Islands. The up side for RL in Australia and the US long term would be fantastic and incredible.

Exactly. It’s a win-win situation. You could help drive some interest in the game (not huge but at least some for small TV rights) and it potentially increases the amount of talent in the competition.

If you wanted to encourage it you can adapt the salary cap to give club free development spots for athletes in non traditional RL areas and a few Pacific Islander spots.

It is a potential double edged sword though. People could rightly argue that we should be concentrating more on local development (which we need to improve on as well) but I think we can and need to do both, in order to grow the talent pool by as much as possible and allow further expansion and growth in the game
 

ReddFelon

Juniors
Messages
1,484
Ah yes, of Course. It’s also a rip off of the Irish game too, isn’t it?
A common myth, but Aussie Rules actually predates Gaelic.

It was created by an Australian who went to Rugby School in the UK, when he came back to Victoria, he found that the only available cricket grounds were too dry to have scrums and rucks, so he and his friends reduced the tackling component. Also at the time, Rugby didn't give points for tries, just a free shot at goal, so they took out the tries in favour of being all about goal scoring.

Originally you could only score off drop goals, but they took that out in the 20th century.

It's an odd game, but ironically shares the same ancestry as League and Union.
 

TheRam

Coach
Messages
11,377
Exactly. It’s a win-win situation. You could help drive some interest in the game (not huge but at least some for small TV rights) and it potentially increases the amount of talent in the competition.

If you wanted to encourage it you can adapt the salary cap to give club free development spots for athletes in non traditional RL areas and a few Pacific Islander spots.

It is a potential double edged sword though. People could rightly argue that we should be concentrating more on local development (which we need to improve on as well) but I think we can and need to do both, in order to grow the talent pool by as much as possible and allow further expansion and growth in the game

Spot on mate. Great minds think alike.

Losers will always find reasons as to why something can't be done.

Queue the losers.
 

AdelaideSharky

Juniors
Messages
613
A common myth, but Aussie Rules actually predates Gaelic.

It was created by an Australian who went to Rugby School in the UK, when he came back to Victoria, he found that the only available cricket grounds were too dry to have scrums and rucks, so he and his friends reduced the tackling component. Also at the time, Rugby didn't give points for tries, just a free shot at goal, so they took out the tries in favour of being all about goal scoring.

Originally you could only score off drop goals, but they took that out in the 20th century.

It's an odd game, but ironically shares the same ancestry as League and Union.
There's also a school of thought that Aussie Rules was influenced by an indigenous game played in western Victoria called Marn Grook.

The view seems to be they claim Tom Wills was influenced by Rugby School as if he came out and claimed the game was the indigenous game it would've killed the game off then and there.
 

TheRam

Coach
Messages
11,377
A common myth, but Aussie Rules actually predates Gaelic.

It was created by an Australian who went to Rugby School in the UK, when he came back to Victoria, he found that the only available cricket grounds were too dry to have scrums and rucks, so he and his friends reduced the tackling component. Also at the time, Rugby didn't give points for tries, just a free shot at goal, so they took out the tries in favour of being all about goal scoring.

Originally you could only score off drop goals, but they took that out in the 20th century.

It's an odd game, but ironically shares the same ancestry as League and Union.

Odd? It's the MacDonald's of Australian sport. Massive and professionally presented well and with a lot of hype, may even taste nice to the dumbed down pallet or child that likes anything that sparkles has sugar, salt and fat and hasn't had a chance to know better. But stealthily it's full of poison and rots you from the inside to the point that once hooked you are a cuck that accepts anything that it blows your way.

League is the filet mignon of all sport. But unfortunately it is being server out of the back of a slaughter house with a rat infested greasy diner up front that has a fat hairy, shirtless, sweaty chef in a filthy apron handing you the plate as he sneezes in your face while picking at his arse.
 

ReddFelon

Juniors
Messages
1,484
There's also a school of thought that Aussie Rules was influenced by an indigenous game played in western Victoria called Marn Grook.

The view seems to be they claim Tom Wills was influenced by Rugby School as if he came out and claimed the game was the indigenous game it would've killed the game off then and there.
Yeah, the marn grook story was invented by AFL marketing in the 90s/2000s to try and increase its profile as an "Authentic Australian game", all the historical investigations have pretty much found at best, some indigenous groups kicked around stuffed animal skins.
 

Colk

Juniors
Messages
1,487
Odd? It's the MacDonald's of Australian sport. Massive and professionally presented well and with a lot of hype, may even taste nice to the dumbed down pallet or child that likes anything that sparkles has sugar, salt and fat and hasn't had a chance to know better. But stealthily it's full of poison and rots you from the inside to the point that once hooked you are a cuck that accepts anything that it blows your way.

League is the filet mignon of all sport. But unfortunately it is being server out of the back of a slaughter house with a rat infested greasy diner up front that has a fat hairy, shirtless, sweaty chef in a filthy apron handing you the plate as he sneezes in your face while picking at his arse.

That’s one of the funniest posts I’ve read but so apt. The biggest problem with Rugby League is how administrators and supporters view their game.

There is also evidence right here on the forum by people who say we can’t put a side here or there because they are rusted on AFL states. Other than it being a logical fallacy (well how or why would you expect people to follow a sport when they have no team to support) do you think AFL (which is a god awful game) would be in the position they are today if they had the same mindset as RL?

No, you put a side in, invest in it properly and be patient - you know successful businesses do the same thing around the world. People will follow or consume something if the product is good.
 

The Great Dane

First Grade
Messages
5,592
A common myth, but Aussie Rules actually predates Gaelic.

It was created by an Australian who went to Rugby School in the UK, when he came back to Victoria, he found that the only available cricket grounds were too dry to have scrums and rucks, so he and his friends reduced the tackling component. Also at the time, Rugby didn't give points for tries, just a free shot at goal, so they took out the tries in favour of being all about goal scoring.

Originally you could only score off drop goals, but they took that out in the 20th century.

It's an odd game, but ironically shares the same ancestry as League and Union.
Apparently the initial Aussie Rules rules are suspiciously similar to some Shrovetide football rules from the midlands.

Could be a coincidence, could be that Tom Wills saw a game while he was at Rugby and was inspired by it, we'll probably never know for sure.
 

T-Boon

Coach
Messages
13,724
This. I have pointed this out before. I can't believe we don't. It is a no brainer to me.

There are that many superior athletes in the US that just don't get a chance for whatever reason that surely a well studied talent scout that focuses their attention on the US could pick up at least 2 or 3 high quality project players each season. I would be no different then picking up a project player from the Pacific Islands. The up side for RL in Australia and the US long term would be fantastic and incredible.

I think just PAC12 (players who don't make the NFL) could provide dozens of NRL players. Whoever the second string RB at USC is should have a 3 x $100k contract waiting for him just to learn the game.
Have a 8 team comp in california.
 

T-Boon

Coach
Messages
13,724
That’s one of the funniest posts I’ve read but so apt. The biggest problem with Rugby League is how administrators and supporters view their game.

There is also evidence right here on the forum by people who say we can’t put a side here or there because they are rusted on AFL states. Other than it being a logical fallacy (well how or why would you expect people to follow a sport when they have no team to support) do you think AFL (which is a god awful game) would be in the position they are today if they had the same mindset as RL?

No, you put a side in, invest in it properly and be patient - you know successful businesses do the same thing around the world. People will follow or consume something if the product is good.
I think RLs expansion strategy should be to attack and take over Rugby more so than AFL in afl locations because rugby is more vulnerable and also it would make the game more international. We should attack rugby in Sydney and Brisbane by getting a great University comp and GPS comp going - funded by the NRL. Also attack Rugby in NZ.
NZ already has good rectangular arenas so that is an advantage.
 

ohitsyou

Juniors
Messages
17
Excited to get out and watch the boys from the new stadium for sure.
Haven’t been to a home game since 2018.. sorta miss the home game vibe and being around majority easts fans again!

the SCG was too much of a ask to pay money and watch footy from IMO
 

Colk

Juniors
Messages
1,487
I think RLs expansion strategy should be to attack and take over Rugby more so than AFL in afl locations because rugby is more vulnerable and also it would make the game more international. We should attack rugby in Sydney and Brisbane by getting a great University comp and GPS comp going - funded by the NRL. Also attack Rugby in NZ.
NZ already has good rectangular arenas so that is an advantage.

I would do both - why limit yourself? I’m in favour of a second NZ side as well as adding a Perth side and even an Adelaide side. Essentially you put a side in wherever it makes commercial sense to do so

In order for RL to ever become a sport that has any sort of presence above and beyond what they have now, they need to start thinking outside of just their own traditional areas and realise having a presence in something is better than not even trying. That means realising that no, you are probably not going to take over rugby in NZ or AFL in Vic/WA/SA. But that doesn’t mean you are precluded from putting a side and giving people an option (a lot of people just like watching a lot of sports)
 
Messages
5,851
I think RLs expansion strategy should be to attack and take over Rugby more so than AFL in afl locations because rugby is more vulnerable and also it would make the game more international. We should attack rugby in Sydney and Brisbane by getting a great University comp and GPS comp going - funded by the NRL. Also attack Rugby in NZ.
NZ already has good rectangular arenas so that is an advantage.
We cannot attack rugby in Europe as they're more cashed up, but we can do it in the Pacific as we're richer than the NZRU. What I would love to see is a concerted effort to make rugby league the biggest mainstream sport across the entire South Pacific. Run an annual Six Nations Cup each year between Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, PNG, Samoa and Tonga, with games played across these regions so that people from over there can see it in the flesh. Run clinics at local schools to identify talented athletes and sign them to developmental contracts. When 10 or 20 locals sign up to the NRL and become household names in Australia it will make the younger generation in the Pacific want to play our game.

Why sign up to play RU in Europe and never get to be a genuine contender at the RWC, when they can play RL closer to home and represent their country every year in the largest RL tournament, with a good chance of winning?

Our future is in the Pacific. Polynesians have the perfect endomoprhic mesomorph somatotype. Melanesians from Fiji also have a somatotype that's perfect for RL. Papuans are Melanesian but appear to be built differently.

England's f**ked as the RFL has no money while ol' ruggers RFU is cashed up.
 

Dogs Of War

Coach
Messages
11,259
This. I have pointed this out before. I can't believe we don't. It is a no brainer to me.

There are that many superior athletes in the US that just don't get a chance for whatever reason that surely a well studied talent scout that focuses their attention on the US could pick up at least 2 or 3 high quality project players each season. I would be no different then picking up a project player from the Pacific Islands. The up side for RL in Australia and the US long term would be fantastic and incredible.

Honestly you need to get the training programs and NRL funding those positions for US players to learn over in America, via a boot camp that allows USA teams to select the cream of the crop of those who are interested. Build the local comp so the pathways are there. Then you can do that working holiday for the best 17 USA players each year to be paid by the NRL directly and aligned with a NRL club. Even if they never hit any further heights than reserve grade, they then go back and take that knowledge with them. Occasionally you will find a keeper. If a NRL team decides to keep a player longer than a year, then the NRL clubs does that off their own bat.
 

TheRam

Coach
Messages
11,377
Honestly you need to get the training programs and NRL funding those positions for US players to learn over in America, via a boot camp that allows USA teams to select the cream of the crop of those who are interested. Build the local comp so the pathways are there. Then you can do that working holiday for the best 17 USA players each year to be paid by the NRL directly and aligned with a NRL club. Even if they never hit any further heights than reserve grade, they then go back and take that knowledge with them. Occasionally you will find a keeper. If a NRL team decides to keep a player longer than a year, then the NRL clubs does that off their own bat.

Whatever it takes mate. It's an effort and expense well worth having. It's the US and if we can get some sort of traction there, it makes everything bigger and better. Why on earth wouldn't you do it? Oh yeah that's right, we need to deal with the small mindedness and selfishness of the people that run the ARLC and its stakeholders first.

In other words it will never happen.
 

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