Michael Chee-Kam charged with assault on Uber driver

Discussion in 'NRL' started by Timmah, Jan 3, 2019.

  1. SBD82

    SBD82 First Grade

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2015
    Messages:
    7,479
    Likes Received:
    7,691
    That's a fair point, and there's no research (to my knowledge) that's been done for this small subsection of the population.

    Anecdotally, it does seem that current players are being charged with offences such as DV and sexual assault more regularly than their retired counterparts. But the retirees have a monopoly on being charged with trafficking offences and homicide.
     
  2. Chin Music

    Chin Music Juniors

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2018
    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    46
    He’s from Innisfail, enough said.
     
  3. avocado

    avocado Juniors

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2018
    Messages:
    593
    Likes Received:
    815
    The governing bodies of each sport showing what is and isn’t acceptable.
    You’re right. There are no similarities.
    CA have balls, NRL clearly don’t.
     
  4. Valheru

    Valheru First Grade

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2011
    Messages:
    6,092
    Likes Received:
    1,791
    One is showing what is and isn't acceptable within the context of actions on the field.

    The other is charged by some on here with showing what is and isn't acceptable in society and being the ethics police which is not their job IMO.

    They are completely separate issues.
     
    Timmah likes this.
  5. T.S Quint

    T.S Quint First Grade

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2013
    Messages:
    8,736
    Likes Received:
    2,718
    It would be a moralistic stance, you are right. But what’s wrong with that?
    The NRL is a business that relies on sponsorship, media attention and viewers to survive. If there is someone within their business that threatens that survival they are within their rights to exclude them from their business.

    There are too many bad news stories coming from the world of Rugby League, and enough is enough. Some people may not believe it hurts the bottom line, but I’m not one of those people.
    People can blame the media all they want for only reporting on the bad stories, but if there’s none to report they would have to focus on the actual game for once.
     
  6. T.S Quint

    T.S Quint First Grade

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2013
    Messages:
    8,736
    Likes Received:
    2,718
    The NRL is allowed to judge what is acceptable for people who are employed by them. These are public figures and the NRL is a very public business. Should they not be able to choose who they have represent their game in the public eye?
     
  7. Timmah

    Timmah LeagueUnlimited News Editor Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Messages:
    99,043
    Likes Received:
    2,943
    Depends - they don't directly employ players, the clubs do.
     
  8. magpie_man

    magpie_man Juniors

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    Messages:
    1,679
    Likes Received:
    537
    I'd say that a significant proportion of professional athletes are wankers; it just comes with the territory.
    They've been dealt the genetic royal flush of excelling in a field that is borderline deified and it inevitably goes to their heads - it'd be hard for it not to.
    Additionally, it requires a certain level of chutzpah to back yourself when the stakes are high.
    The difference is that the smarter ones know when to reign the ego in and, you know, not rape women or bash random Uber drivers or drink-drive mere hours after being awarded the Australian captaincy; the dumb ones don't.
    Hubris combined with stupidity is the problem.
     
    Life's Good and super_coach like this.
  9. super_coach

    super_coach Bench

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Messages:
    4,466
    Likes Received:
    903
    MCK would be the last footballer I would have picked to get into a Uber driver. The guy is red hot with his religion and by all accounts a really nice kid. Sadly he probably has two drinking sessions a year. Anyway absolutely no excuse to belt anyone, but I hope there is a roads back at some stage if he is proven guilty of the charges
     
  10. T.S Quint

    T.S Quint First Grade

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2013
    Messages:
    8,736
    Likes Received:
    2,718
    They all sign a standard NRL contract, don’t they?
    They aren’t employed by the club (as a player at least) until the NRL ratifies their contract.
    The NRL has the power to decide who gets to play in their league and who doesn’t.
     
  11. no name

    no name Coach

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2007
    Messages:
    14,053
    Likes Received:
    3,608
    Pending the NRL registering the contract.
     
  12. Timmah

    Timmah LeagueUnlimited News Editor Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Messages:
    99,043
    Likes Received:
    2,943
    That's still different to directly employing them.
     
  13. T.S Quint

    T.S Quint First Grade

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2013
    Messages:
    8,736
    Likes Received:
    2,718
    True, the clubs are the ones paying the bills.
    Still, my point stands that the NRL has a right to deregister players on moral grounds if they feel it is hurting their business.
     
  14. Timmah

    Timmah LeagueUnlimited News Editor Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Messages:
    99,043
    Likes Received:
    2,943
    They have the right to, but I'm not sure they proactively exercise that right very often.
     
  15. Valheru

    Valheru First Grade

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2011
    Messages:
    6,092
    Likes Received:
    1,791
    The problem with it being a moralistic stance is it isn't up to the NRL to tell me, you or anyone else what is and isn't appropriate in society. Keep in mind I am not necessarily referring to serious crimes which any reasonable person would consider as ethically wrong. Some people may think any DUI is cause for a lengthy ban, some may not, some people may think players deserve a 2nd chance after assault or DV issues especially first offenders who are young, some may not. So it then becomes a debate of severity and we will never get agreement on that.

    The NRL (and any other business) absolutely has the right to refuse to employ people it thinks will damage their image. Ignoring the fact the NRL doesn't actually employ the players for a second, commercial considerations cause another issue here because what happens when not hiring or continue to a hire an employee/player is actually worse commercially for the NRL or club. As a random example using 2 players from my club, I can promise you that the roosters/NRL would have no problem taking a moralistic and harsh stance against say Lindsay Collins but I can promise you James Tedesco wouldn't cop the same treatment as he is too valuable so yes they can make a decision to not hire based on commercial impact but with that naturally comes inconsistency and double standards as not everyone is equal to the club/NRL so quite clearly blanket bans aren't viable.
     
    Life's Good and Timmah like this.
  16. T.S Quint

    T.S Quint First Grade

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2013
    Messages:
    8,736
    Likes Received:
    2,718
    They don’t, but they have done a few times in the past.
    They have deregistered Todd Carney, plus handed down suspensions for players like Brett Stewart.

    I think they should use their right to do this more often, taking it out of the clubs’ hands.
     
  17. Timmah

    Timmah LeagueUnlimited News Editor Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Messages:
    99,043
    Likes Received:
    2,943
    Brett Stewart incident is 11 years and 3 administrations ago so I'm not sure how relevant that even is anymore.

    As for Todd Carney, that seemed to be more about a continual string of events over several years rather than the simplistic "deregistered for pissing in his mouth" some seem to think.
     
  18. T.S Quint

    T.S Quint First Grade

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2013
    Messages:
    8,736
    Likes Received:
    2,718
    I wasn’t really mentioning those incidents to focus on what they were punished for, more so for the precedent that the NRL has punished players themselves and taken it out of the clubs’ hands.
     
  19. Timmah

    Timmah LeagueUnlimited News Editor Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Messages:
    99,043
    Likes Received:
    2,943
    That's fine - I was illustrating why the action was taken in those instances.

    As others have said, blanket rules don't work. Each case as it comes (and no I don't think they always get it right, Matt Lodge is an easy example).
     
  20. seanoff

    seanoff Juniors

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Messages:
    932
    Likes Received:
    70
    The NRL aren’t party to the contract?

    In some sports the governing body of sport are a party to the contract so they can be involved. Say in the unlikely event a club goes bust, the league takes on responsibilty for the contract and payment. Etc etc etc
     

Share This Page