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NRL faces major turmoil as clubs threaten breakaway league

Perth Red

Post Whore
Messages
65,719
I don't know if the money the Clubs want is excessive or not. But if Grant did agreed to that 12 months ago why has he gone back on that now? Was he just talking shit to keep people happy? Had no f**kin idea till later what he'd promised? What has changed that they can't keep that agreement anymore?

.
Could be a few things
A) Richardsons strategy and decision to cut NYC and bring in a proper international second tier requiring substantially more funding
B) continued plight of clubs need bailing out and still no sale of knights and Titans and no sign dragons are changing their fortunes requiring more money for NRL to have in reserve
C) The fact NRL lost over $20mill last year may have them spooked
D) sense the rlpa may want a bigger cap increase than they had envisaged
 

BunniesMan

Immortal
Messages
33,688
This problem would be solved if the salary cap was a % of the overall NRL income. This is how it works in the NBA and you have clarity from year to year
 

Perth Red

Post Whore
Messages
65,719
Problem is NRL revenue can vary a great deal. If you were going to a fixed % better to base it on tv deal revenue which is guaranteed for 5 years
 

Nice Beaver

First Grade
Messages
5,920
Souths' Richardson has been rumored as one of the names to take our game well into the 21st century.

Maybe "Super League MKII"?

God help us.

The more things change, the more they stay the same.

While league continues to kick itself in the nuts, it scratches its collective head and wonders why other sports grow and thrive and we continue on a merry-go-round of ineptness.
 
Messages
11,390
Buzz and his dumb ideas..... why would you even consider someone from Nine?


http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/sp...n/news-story/ed15d38b4648489fd25616b751f65573


WITH John Grant all but gone as ARLC boss, Sports Editor-at-large Phil Rothfield reveals the key contenders for the job.

David Gyngell

Former Channel 9 boss has a huge network of connections within the game and corporate Australia. Understands the club culture and politics better than most. However, his close relationship with Roosters chairman Nick Politis is a potential conflict of interest. Gyngell would also have to stand down from the board of Channel 9 because it’s another potential conflict of interest.

0cf1a57fb44b144faa43ffd1c8eb3bef

Former Channel 9 boss David Gyngell.
John Quayle

A popular former ARL chief executive who was forced out of the game after the Super League war. He is now one of the most respected figures in Australian sport and has remained involved in the game on the Newcastle Knights board in recent years. Has the business nous and relationships with the right powerbrokers to fix the current mess.

George Peponis

Probably the outsider in the field. A former Bulldogs legend, sports medicine
doctor and current chairman of the NSW Rugby League. Has huge support from the Sydney clubs and with justification. A smooth operator with long-time connections across the code and with few enemies. Business background not as strong as his rivals but still a great operator.

Katie Page


A former NRL director who was forced to resign to make way for the independent commission under a revamped administration when News Corp left the game in 2011. The Harvey Norman boss knows the footy fan demographic better than anyone and has all the credentials for the tough job. Sadly, her current role would probably prevent her taking on the job.
 

Hello, I'm The Doctor

First Grade
Messages
9,124
I wouldnt be so quick to dismiss Gyngell....

We all know how good he is a f*cking over his opponent, so it might be good to have him working FOR us.

Also, if there is a ARLC shakeup (i honestly dont see JGrant moving on though), id love to see Graeme Samuel step in as Chairman; i feel like he would do what he felt was needed without much sense of self-preservation.

Having said that, i think Grant will stay as long as he feels he has something to offer. He seems like he is in it for the long run...
 
Messages
14,494
Buzz and his dumb ideas..... why would you even consider someone from Nine?


http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/sp...n/news-story/ed15d38b4648489fd25616b751f65573


WITH John Grant all but gone as ARLC boss, Sports Editor-at-large Phil Rothfield reveals the key contenders for the job.

David Gyngell

Former Channel 9 boss has a huge network of connections within the game and corporate Australia. Understands the club culture and politics better than most. However, his close relationship with Roosters chairman Nick Politis is a potential conflict of interest. Gyngell would also have to stand down from the board of Channel 9 because it’s another potential conflict of interest.

0cf1a57fb44b144faa43ffd1c8eb3bef

Former Channel 9 boss David Gyngell.
John Quayle

A popular former ARL chief executive who was forced out of the game after the Super League war. He is now one of the most respected figures in Australian sport and has remained involved in the game on the Newcastle Knights board in recent years. Has the business nous and relationships with the right powerbrokers to fix the current mess.

George Peponis

Probably the outsider in the field. A former Bulldogs legend, sports medicine
doctor and current chairman of the NSW Rugby League. Has huge support from the Sydney clubs and with justification. A smooth operator with long-time connections across the code and with few enemies. Business background not as strong as his rivals but still a great operator.

Katie Page


A former NRL director who was forced to resign to make way for the independent commission under a revamped administration when News Corp left the game in 2011. The Harvey Norman boss knows the footy fan demographic better than anyone and has all the credentials for the tough job. Sadly, her current role would probably prevent her taking on the job.


Surprised he didnt suggest Bec.
 

Canard

Immortal
Messages
34,361
Demoting NYC to state level is one of the worst ideas in Australian sport history.

Suddenly state clubs and comps are burdened with a millions of dollars of operating costs, all so the NRL can produce a financial report that shows they are in the black.
 
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betcats

Referee
Messages
23,474
Anyone who hires Greenberg to run the game is probably a moron, Toddy you are gone next merkin. This merkin hired Smith as well, f**k me the clubs should of done this 12 months ago.
 

taipan

Referee
Messages
22,403
I may be missing something ,and according to my missus I usually do.
But surely the horse must go before the cart.
Get moving on the negotiations with the RLPA and the NRL on just what the salary cap will be from 2018.that is the pressing issue .We have star players now who will not sign on new contracts ,because clubs have NFI what the salary cap will be.Is it any wonder Tomtomdrumalolo and Valentine's Day are in the US testing out for the NFL.

If I'm working for a company and my contract is up for renewal in 12 months and the employer says , we have no idea want we can pay you and we have no idea when we will know what we can pay you, you start shuffling your feet nervously.

Once the salary cap is set in situ, then go into the bullring and argue whether the clubs should get 130% ,120% or 115% of the salary cap.Just bang bloody heads together ,time is running out.

The code knows the money they will be receiving in 2018,and surely by then the Tits and Knights will have been flogged to Donald Trump or Skase whatever.It's not as if they are unsaleable.The code has had bids already.

Whether rugby league has been run by rl people or by a Commission .It's always been a roll coaster ride of lack of certainty, commonsense ,understanding of the fans and players and money waste and preferential treatment to some clubs.

The only things rugby league got right this year was the RLWC in Nth America circa 2025(not an NRL decision) and of course the 50 year good guys winning the NRL premiership circa 2016.
Other than that it has been one hell of a cluster..........

And Grant has the raging charisma of an Easter Island statue,and his working relationship with the NRL clubs is now in my view untenable.
 

El Diablo

Post Whore
Messages
94,107
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/spo...e/news-story/f7b13a568fec9a33dd56f19a660016da

ARLC chairman John Grant fights to keep job after no-confidence vote
  • The Australian
  • 12:00AM November 25, 2016
  • Brent Read
Chairman John Grant is fighting to retain his position at the helm of rugby league amid a vote of no confidence in his leadership and revelations some clubs are lobbying to have former Nine Network chief executive David Gyngell join the game’s independent commission, potentially as his replacement.

The chairs of the 16 clubs held a phone hook-up yesterday afternoon where they drafted a letter outlining their lack of confidence in Grant’s leadership and calling on his fellow commissioners to support his removal. Gyngell is currently acting in an advisory role with the Rugby League Players Association and, under the existing ARLC constitution, would require the support of the current commissioners.

His addition would also require a change in the constitution given he has been a recent director of the Sydney Roosters — the commission was designed to distance the game’s decision-making from former club officials.

It is also likely he would be required to stand down from his positions on the Nine Network board and the RLPA.

It is understood the letter warns Grant that his future will be played out in public unless he agrees to stand down from his job on the commission and foreshadows the clubs forcing an extraordinary general meeting to vote on his leadership before the end of the year.

It also calls on the existing commissioners to support changes to the constitution that would give the clubs two representatives on the commission, as well as one representative of the state bodies.

The Australian understands some club officials are pushing for Gyngell — a former Sydney Roosters board member and a key player in the negotiations that led to the game signing the richest broadcasting deal in its history — to join the commission, potentially in the role of chairman.

The latest developments continue a dramatic 48 hours which began when Grant and NRL chief executive Todd Greenberg told club officials they were putting talks on hold over their proposed licencing agreements.

Club bosses reacted by targeting Grant, whose position as chairman appears untenable.

“There is no confidence in John Grant’s ability to handle any of the big challenges the sport faces,” one chairman told The Australian. “They are hardly setting the world on fire in terms of governance of the game. Yesterday was one of the worst things I have seen anyone do in business in terms of the quality and understanding of their actions.”

The unified front presented by the clubs has put them at odds with the commission, creating significant ramifications for the two sides that remain in the control of the NRL.

The commission owns the licences for Newcastle and Gold Coast, having bailed both clubs out of financial difficulties. It is understood NRL officials contacted them last night seeking clarity over their plans.

While their decision to vote in favour of the no-confidence motion puts them at odds with their owner, there is a school of thought that the commission would be reluctant to take action because of the potential public relations disaster if they stepped in.

The debate over the game’s leadership hijacked yesterday’s unveiling of the NRL draw, which was announced by Greenberg.

“It’s not a new phenomenon that the head body of a sport and its clubs will have differing views on funding and we will continue to have those discussion,” Greenberg said.

“There will be more discussions in the next week, or so I would anticipate, with the chairmen of the clubs and we will work together to find a resolution.

“The principle of what the NRL and the commission have to do is divide the distribution of its funding adequately across the games. There is always going to be some angst between the clubs about what their distribution model looks like and ours.

“We had a frank and open disussion yesterday. Sometimes those discussions are quite difficult but we will continue to have them.”

Asked what had changed over the past 12 months and led to the commission altering its stance, Greenberg said: “I think what has happened is there has been some differing principles from last year to now.

“We were up front with the clubs yesterday and we will continue to be up front with them.

“The clubs are such an important part of the game but also there are other parts of the game including grassroots.

“We’ve got some concerning trends about participation in sports. So we have to make sure that in the next cycle we have a distribution model that allows us to invest in all parts to grow the sport.

“That’s a prudent outcome for the commission to undertake.”

Greenberg also backed Grant.

“John’s a good man who works hard and always puts the game first,” Greenberg said.

“He will continue to do that as chairman — I have absolute faith in that.”

The commission justified its decision to delay talks with the clubs by saying it wanted to focus on talks with the players union, although those discussions threaten to be long and exhausting.

The salary cap is only one of the issues, albeit a significant one. There has been talk the commission wants to push for a $9 million cap in 2018, a figure that is unlikely to win the support of the Rugby League Players Association.

The RLPA is also pushing to have the game’s illicit drugs policy toned down and wants a dramatic increase in the salary cap exemptions for long-serving players.
 

flippikat

Bench
Messages
4,436
I wouldnt be so quick to dismiss Gyngell....

We all know how good he is a f*cking over his opponent, so it might be good to have him working FOR us.

Plus he surely knows the value that can be gained by expansion - which could see that back on track.

Even with him severing formal ties to Channel 9, he'd be well aware that a 2nd Brisbane team can grow the TV rights dollar & Perth offers real opportunities too.
 
Messages
13,900
The following is from the Sydney Morning Herald -

November 24 2016 - 6:59PM
NRL club bosses move motion of no confidence in ARL commission chairman John Grant
by Georgina Robinson and Adam Pengilly

The bosses of all 16 NRL clubs lodged a vote of no confidence in ARL commission chair John Grant on Thursday as a full blown mutiny threatens to topple rugby league's most powerful administrator.

The chairpersons intended to sign a letter, which was to be delivered to the ARL's independent commissioners, to act as the trigger for the club-inspired push for an extraordinary general meeting and Grant's removal.

It came a day after four club bosses stormed out of a scheduled meeting with Grant and NRL chief executive Todd Greenberg over an increasingly bitter funding dispute and break-up of the record $1.8 billion broadcast deal from 2018.

Grant appears to be on borrowed time after a turbulent five-year tenure, with even the NRL-owned Gold Coast and Newcastle lending their support to the no confidence motion which has exposed an ever-increasing gulf between League Central and the clubs.

Worrying registration levels and a perceived shortfall in grassroots funding triggered a stunning funding backflip over club grants on Wednesday by Grant and Greenberg, which had four club bosses walk out on the meeting.

Greenberg backed the embattled Grant as unrest over funding uncertainty threatens to boil over, with club bosses still privately seething the game's two biggest powerbrokers had waited until this week to flip on an in-principle agreement for club grants from 2018 onwards.

Greenberg said he had "absolute faith" in Grant's ability to steer the game through the negotiation of a new union agreement and club funding deal, despite his unpopularity in clubland.

Four club chairmen – Canterbury's Ray Dib, North Queensland's Laurence Lancini, Cronulla's Damian Keogh and Melbourne's Bart Campbell – walked out on a meeting with Grant and Greenberg after the latter failed to re-affirm their commitment to club funding at 130 per cent of the yet-to-be-determined salary cap.

Greenberg used the release of next year's draw on Thursday to hint a worrying downturn in junior participation levels and grassroots funding had been behind the about-turn, but club administrators remain furious it had taken so long for the NRL's position to be made clear.

Figures obtained from the NRL show a less than half a per cent drop in club registered numbers since last year, while overall participation is up six per cent to more than 772,000. Nevertheless, Greenberg said he had concerns about the game's future.

"We've got some concerns about where we're heading," Greenberg said. "We've got to think very carefully about our strategy and where we apply funds. Whether it's in regional areas in the bush or the city areas, we've got to be very, very careful about what we do next."

Many club bosses spoke about how their cash-strapped clubs had crafted budgets for the next couple of financial years under the memorandum of understanding signed last December, which will now need to be revisited.

A salary cap for 2018 – projected to be anywhere between $9 million and $10 million – is still being wrangled over and has plunged the player market into uncertainty.

Rugby League Players Association general manager Clint Newton was diplomatic on Thursday at the launch of the 2017 NRL draw, which has delivered rugby league players a major workplace win in the form of a 30 per cent reduction in five-day turnarounds between games.

Newton said a year-long lag in collective bargaining agreement negotiations, which has stalled the club funding talks, was not ideal but said the RLPA was committed to working with the NRL and ARL.

"We're still 100 per cent committed to trying to negotiate a CBA that provides players as genuine partners in the game," he said. "That partnership is going to include the NRL and clubs ... it's all about being transparent and inclusive. We're confident and committed to trying to get the best outcome for everyone."

Greenberg played down tensions at the launch and backed Grant, who has overseen five seasons as ARL chairman.

"John's a good man who works very hard and always puts the game first. He'll continue to do that as the chairman, I have absolute faith in that," Greenberg said.

"It's not a new phenomenon that the head body of a sport and its clubs will have differing views on funding and we'll continue to have those discussions. There'll be more discussions in the next week or so, I would anticipate, with the chairmen of the clubs, and we'll work together to find a resolution."

Greenberg said on Thursday that neither he nor Grant had reneged on the memorandum of understanding, but had told the clubs they would finalise the new collective bargaining agreement first before negotiating the new funding deal.

Greenberg also foreshadowed changing priorities for the sport as the NRL battled falling participation numbers.

"I think what's happened is there's been some differing principles from last year to now and there are things you learn along the way. We were upfront with the clubs [on Wednesday] and we'll continue to be upfront with them," Greenberg said.

Interesting figure in the above article the drop is junior registrations, taken from the NRL's own figures, is 0.5%.

At the end of the day who earns the money for rugby league, the NRL administration, or what the clubs put on the paddock? Could have fooled me but I'm pretty sure its the latter. Without them, the NRL have no product to earn any money.
 

insert.pause

First Grade
Messages
6,446
Apparently the money is no longer available for the clubs because the commission has identified digital as an area they want very significant investment.
 

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