For those who can also read

Discussion in 'The Music & Movies Forum' started by Stewbum, Sep 9, 2016.

  1. King hit

    King hit First Grade

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    Milat inside Australia’s biggest manhunt - Clive Small

    Deep inside the investigation behind the backpacker murders and conviction of Ivan Milat as told by the commissioner who lead the investigation. The backpacker murders has been a topic that has interested me so it was informing to hear more of the investigation and about Ivan and the family history from the person in charge.

    Did answer some of my questions whilst putting the end to others about if other members of the family were involved. Also confirmed my suspicion that there were more victims (they strongly believed he murdered a young man in the mid 80’s).

    Milat is why I would never go hitchhiking or recommend it, you don’t who this stranger is or what they are capable of. I cringed when I saw these young hitchhikers on the pacific highway at Chindereh last month.
     

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  2. King hit

    King hit First Grade

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    Just finished Shane Webcke’s autobiography. It was a pretty dull read which was disappointing.
     
  3. Parra

    Parra Referee

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    Sometimes you can judge a book by it's cover.
     
  4. Perth Tiger

    Perth Tiger Juniors

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    Another one for any history fans.

    The Storm before the Storm by Mike Duncan (of The History of Rome podcast fame).

    It tells the story of the beginning of the end of the Roman Republic. Focusing on the Gracchi brothers, Marius and Sulla and touches on all the major changes to the political system that lead to the later fall of the republic with the more famous Caesar, Pompey the Great and Augustus.

    It is written in a very similar style to his podcasts which is an easily readable narrative form.

    What I love about this era of history is it is so easy to draw parallels with modern politics, whether Aus or overseas politics. Not also correct parallels but it is fun nonetheless.

    A lot of the narrative focuses on the break of political norms such as the forming of political parties (although not in the modern sense), the opposition to any policy proposed by the opposite side (even if they had supported the policy previously when proposed by their side) and the 'need to win' trumping any other political goal.
     
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  5. Rhino_NQ

    Rhino_NQ Immortal

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    Few chapters into Robin Williams biography. Bloke was one of a kind
     
  6. Parra

    Parra Referee

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    Fascinating piece of history. I've read some formal texts the size of a besa block. So many names and places it can become a blur. Would be good to read something a bit more accessible on the same topic. Easy readable narrative sounds good to me.
     
  7. Perth Tiger

    Perth Tiger Juniors

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    Yeah, this book kinda of just touches the surface of most of the issues so I found it definitely helps to already have some knowledge of the period.
     
  8. Parra

    Parra Referee

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    Love kindle. One click and you've got it. It's now in my queue.
     
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  9. Silent Knight

    Silent Knight First Grade

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    Some of the books I have in my bookcase:
    • Lord of the Rings (JRR Tolkien) - in my opinion the greatest book I've ever read. The sheer epicness of it leaves me astounded and I can't read it anymore (for now) because I need to get the book re-binded - I've read it that much.
    • A range of Wilbur Smith books - only his old books with my favourites being When the Lion Feeds, The Sunbird and A Time To Die. His latest books though (written by others) are complete trash, they don't have any depth and the violence is ridiculously over the top to compensate for wafer-thin plots. I made the mistake of buying some of his newer books (at a discounted rate) but after 1 read I just traded them in at Archives Books in Brisbane. Not a fan anymore.
    • Conn Iggulden's Julius Caesar and Ghengis Khan's books. Great for a bit of escapism, not what you would call historically accurate in any way though.
    • Thomas Keneally's Schindler's List and Heather Morris's The Tattooist of Auschwitz. I've always shown an interest in the Holocaust because I seek to understand how rational people can descend into evil and perpetrate the very worst of humanity. I've been to Anne Frank's house, Mauthausen concentration camp and the Holocaust museum in Washington DC. Those places moved me deeply, and so did these books. Both are very powerful reads and are one of the reasons why I will never support politicians who seek to demonise a minority group all for the sake of power (you can probably guess who this is).
    • Stephen King books - not much to say, the guy is a master. My absolute favourite is Salem's Lot as I consider it an even better vampire novel than Dracula (which I have and I felt it was a bit of a grind to get through, sacrilege yes I know). Other much beloved books include The Stand, Pet Semetary, It, Cell and The Shining.
    I'm currently reading Billy Slater's autobiography which is interesting in terms of what his early life was like (the long hours in Gai Waterhouse's stables, how he got down to Brisbane Norths, the times when he wasn't in the rep teams) but I find he is a bit defensive in terms of the salary cap cheating and you feel as though he hasn't really accepted the penalties that were handed down to the club. It's still a more interesting read than Andrew John's autobiography though, as he spent half the book apologizing for being caught out with recreational drugs, which got a bit tiresome after a while. Yes Joey I know you're sorry.

    My favourite league autobiography of all time though would be Chief Harragon's One Perfect Day, which is just raw emotion covering such things like him driving his teammates down to Sydney to sign contracts with the ARL, when News Limited was ready to pounce on Newcastle, the passion he felt when he spoke with his teammates on the eve of the 1997 grand final and his farewell game, just pure raw emotion. The guy is a Newcastle legend.
     

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