What's new
The Front Row Forums

Register a free account today to become a member of the world's largest Rugby League discussion forum! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Grassroots ( junior league) keeping Nrl accountable!

Stallion

First Grade
Messages
7,467
Today I watched a Backyard league clinic at a Catholic school. In the 30 minutes some kick and catch drills , a kick tennis game and a run and bump drill transpired. At no stage was the fundamental skill of the play the ball and basic running and passing displayed. The skills actually taught/used could have been transferable to other codes. The core rugby league centric skills were not displayed . I mentioned this to the BACKYARD league employee and he agreed that the rugby league centric skills should be featured. Atm it seems this is not happening? It seems it's a real struggle to get genuine progress and traction of playing rugby league in a number of scenarios. Looks like actual development programs are an issue as well.
 

Perth Red

Post Whore
Messages
66,655
Not sure kids playing the ball will be that much fun to them or entice them into the game! These sessions are to have fun with a rugby league ball in your hand, not teach them the skill of the game.
 

Perth Red

Post Whore
Messages
66,655
The Mandurah Storm Rugby League Club and South Mandurah Cricket Club unveiled their fresh new Ocean Road Sports Facility digs at a ribbon cutting ceremony on Monday afternoon.

Both local clubs were in attendance as City of Mandurah Mayor Rhys Williams and National Rugby League (NRL) WA operations manager Tony Crowe officially opened the new complex.

Located in Dawesville adjacent to Ocean Road Primary School, the ground will house the rugby league club during the winter while holding cricket matches throughout the summer months.

The high-quality home boasts floodlights for night games and training sessions, along with a kiosk and clubroom facilities which will allow the clubs to hold significant events.

The Storm kicked off their time at the complex with a bang when they held the NRL WA junior preliminary finals at the ground over the weekend, with more than 2000 people flocking to the Dawesville ground from the metropolitan area.

Club president Jade Lund said the new space gave the Storm the opportunity to expand its identity within the community.

“Having this new ground is going to make such a big difference to our club – it already has,” she said.

“We’ve done it tough for so long but now we really have a space that we can own and we couldn’t be more thankful to NRL WA and the City of Mandurah for making it possible.

“It was absolutely incredible to be able to host the preliminary finals over the weekend and we’ll look to be doing even more of that in the future now.”

The facility was made possible thanks in part to a $200,000 grant from the NRL Footy Facilities Fund, the first of its kind in Western Australia.

Mr Crowe said it would provide valuable support to the Mandurah community.

“For us it’s not just about promoting rugby league, but promoting sport in general,” he said.

“If this means more kids are outside getting active and leading healthy lifestyles then that’s something the NRL wants to be a part of.”

https://www.mandurahmail.com.au/sto...-a-home-at-new-dawesville-facilities/#slide=3
 

taipan

Referee
Messages
22,429
Good to see the money from the NRL Facilities Fund being used in non heartland states.
Is it on the land next door to the primary school on Ocean Road?
 

Perth Red

Post Whore
Messages
66,655
Good to see the money from the NRL Facilities Fund being used in non heartland states.
Is it on the land next door to the primary school on Ocean Road?

Yes a little bit of co-contribution can often leverage a lot of funds. This would have been out of the $10mill pot the nrl set aside for supporting grassroots projects. The full project cost $1.5mill. Mandurah storm are one of our newest clubs and to have a quality home like this so early is a big bonus for the club.

Yeh it’s on ocean road at the primary school field area
 

Pedge1971

First Grade
Messages
5,898
Walgett Knockout this weekend in jeopardy. Twitter comes to the rescue.

This is the outcome after George posted it was at threatthis morning. Why the f**k Buzz got added I have no clue but Beatie seems to have stepped in

Great tournament and something grassroots kids in the bush aim towards every year.

CRL and NRL have nfi...


Check out @gorgeousgrose’s Tweet:
 

taipan

Referee
Messages
22,429
Yes a little bit of co-contribution can often leverage a lot of funds. This would have been out of the $10mill pot the nrl set aside for supporting grassroots projects. The full project cost $1.5mill. Mandurah storm are one of our newest clubs and to have a quality home like this so early is a big bonus for the club.

Yeh it’s on ocean road at the primary school field area


Now established my bro -in-law when he moved to Perth ,is living in Dawesville,a burb of Mandura.
Small bleeding world.A Dragon's fan who went to the double header with his son.
 

no name

Coach
Messages
19,360
Walgett Knockout this weekend in jeopardy. Twitter comes to the rescue.

This is the outcome after George posted it was at threatthis morning. Why the f**k Buzz got added I have no clue but Beatie seems to have stepped in

Great tournament and something grassroots kids in the bush aim towards every year.

CRL and NRL have nfi...


Check out @gorgeousgrose’s Tweet:
Why the absolutely hopeless CRL is still a thing has me f**ked!
 

Perth Red

Post Whore
Messages
66,655
Rugby League participation grew more than 3.5% in 2018 with 36,900 people playing rugby league for the first time.

Registered female participation remained the strongest growth area for the game with a 29% increase on 2017 figures. The number of women playing rugby league has now more than doubled since 2015.

Other key highlights include:
• More than 100,000 participants in NSW for first time
• Growth of 5.5% in NSWRL figures for the first time in five years
• 5.4% growth for CRL
• Growth in Queensland of 1.82%
• 16.7% growth in Western Australia
• Record participation levels in Victoria

5CAA3380-F101-4D3B-BC07-791A38F6109E.jpeg

https://www.nrl.com/news/2018/09/20/rugby-league-participation-up-in-2018/
 

Perth Red

Post Whore
Messages
66,655
Not sure if same in other States but in WA kids have to wear a scrum cap. Clubs are offering these at $40. Might not sound much but for a struggling parent that might be the difference between their kid playing RL or not. With $500mill a year would it be so outrageous for the NRL to cover this cost?
 

Shark62

Juniors
Messages
2,497
Not sure if same in other States but in WA kids have to wear a scrum cap. Clubs are offering these at $40. Might not sound much but for a struggling parent that might be the difference between their kid playing RL or not. With $500mill a year would it be so outrageous for the NRL to cover this cost?
What are club numbers like in wa this year? Victoria’s are definitely up.
 

Perth Red

Post Whore
Messages
66,655
What are club numbers like in wa this year? Victoria’s are definitely up.

Not sure, last year we had a 16% growth which was fantastic after a stagnant year before. We have a new Jnr club down in Gt Southern this year so will see more kids playing in that regional area.
 

Perth Red

Post Whore
Messages
66,655
Bit hard to know exactly what's going on with the very fudgey "participation" way of recording who is playing RL. Wish the NRL and State bodies would be more accountable and publish actual registered players numbers again as opposed to now where they've abandoned any quantitive reporting! This article starts with participation numbers then considers if the games increased push to get blokes gambling on it is impacting player numbers.


The biggest challenge facing rugby league, according to its club chief executives and everyone knowledgeable about the game, is player numbers.
Yet this is not translating into enough young and teenaged boys playing the game to assure its future. (Female participation is still rising, off a lower base.) From 2015 to 2021, participation in male tackle rugby league in Australia declined by 12,000, or eight per cent. In Parramatta, Penrith and south-western Sydney, it fell by as much as 26 per cent.
At the current rate, rugby league’s destiny is looking more like America’s NFL, a sport watched by many but played by an ever-diminishing gladiatorial fraction, with a future that resembles The Hunger Games.

The trend is not peculiar to rugby league. Most sports see a drop-off in their male playing ranks from about the age of 13. Other attractions and commitments compete for time; playing the game gets more serious from that age; Mum and Dad are no longer so influential. With a contact sport like league, there is the added factor of increased awareness of the dangers of concussion, as well as other career-ending injuries. But mostly, as boys become men, they find other things to do.
Codes respond by bolstering numbers through getting more girls and women onto the field and spreading spin-off versions such as LeagueTag. But rugby league also has another, slightly weird relationship with its young male “participants”, a mixed message if ever there was one.

Peter V’landys, the chairman of the Australian Rugby League Commission who enjoys Bob Hawke-like approval ratings for his management through the COVID-19 pandemic, says the ARLC has spent “tens of millions of dollars” on strategies to stabilise the fall in player numbers. This money flows down through the state organisations and the NRL clubs into local areas. The ARLC is the provider of those funds and the setter of that strategy.
Yet it’s a bizarre strategy that sources that money from an industry that is closely tied up with the social changes that have seen such a precipitous fall in participation. Rugby league is robbing Peter to pay Paul, only Peter and Paul are both busy losing all their money at the pub and on their betting accounts and won’t be registering with their teams to play this year. By creating more young male gamblers, rugby league is helping to accelerate the fall in its own player numbers.

V’landys, who runs Racing NSW when not at work running rugby league, is not just a supporter of gambling. He is an evangelical. Gambling is not, in his view, a necessary evil that accompanies sport but a welcome and enjoyable part of it.

Increased gambling revenue helped the ARLC make a $43 million surplus last year. Put another way, the league-watching population’s expenditure shifted from buying boots and mouthguards and registering for clubs to losing on bets. League’s response? Find new populations to tax.

OVID-19 was a boon for gambling. Australian spending on wagering has trebled since 2020, according to an analytical study by Accenture and Illion. A survey by the Australian government found that the big rise was among males aged 18 to 34, whose individual spend rose by more than 50 per cent and who were at most risk of gambling-related harm.
So the very same demographic that rugby league is losing from its playing ranks it is successfully turning into sports bettors.
In racing, which recirculates money between gamblers and participants, it hardly matters. Newly converted gamblers were never going to turn into jockeys. But in rugby league, those young men are making an active choice each weekend. Pub or play? Do I spend my money on registration fees and gear and fitness and getting out? Oh no, I don’t have any spare cash any more, it disappeared somewhere.

It doesn’t have to be that way – there’s nothing stopping anyone from playing amateur rugby league and betting on it as well – but if you have anything to do with young men, you might want to consider the actual reality. Their gambling losses are circulating into the sport that they are choosing, in record numbers, to stop playing.
The South Sydney Rabbitohs and Canterbury Bulldogs deserve an ovation for refusing to take gambling money any more as jersey sponsorship.
They have seen a truth that the governors of the game are still blind to: the prominence of gambling, the styling of rugby league as a conveyance for getting more and more young people to gamble, the reconception of rugby league as if it is racing, is an active turn-off for many parents and an unsavoury attachment to a sport that should have at least something to do with health and fitness. Those two clubs, the Rabbitohs and Bulldogs, are seeing their fans as people, not just a source of potential income.

There are numbers and there are numbers. A dollar of betting income is just a number. A person who has dropped out of playing the game is “a number” in a census, sure, but he’s also a young man who has made a decision. The higher-ups, in their obsession with one type of number, have overlooked how much harm they are doing to their own cause.

 
Last edited:
Messages
15,623
Geez his agenda is clear.
Go read the Lawson report on AfL dodgy numbers then come back .
You won't because anything negative about AFL is ignored while you have pot shots at RL .
 

Perth Red

Post Whore
Messages
66,655
Lol you two are so afl obsessed, and yes they fudge the whole ‘participation’ bs numbers as well. Who gives a sht how many kids do a playground session with a development officer once in their life. the nrl should be producing state by state registered players numbers so we can see the true state of the game.
 
Messages
3,224
Lol you two are so afl obsessed, and yes they fudge the whole ‘participation’ bs numbers as well. Who gives a sht how many kids do a playground session with a development officer once in their life. the nrl should be producing state by state registered players numbers so we can see the true state of the game.
grab a dictionary , look up the word
hypocrite ...
 

Latest posts

Top